Thread Closed  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
25-02-2003, 12:27   #1
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 13
The Business of Cinema in Dublin

I'm from out of town, but am interested in getting a greater understanding of how the cinema industry works here in Dublin. Others have told me that there used to be many more cinemas in Dublin, including the Carlton, the Ambassador, the Cameo, etc. These were apparently closed down. I understand that there are several new mega-plexes in the suburbs.

Compared to Canada, the attendance in the remaining theatres is extraordinary. The only times films sell-out in Canada is for highly-anticipated showings on opening weekends.

Why, then, aren't there more cinemas downtown? Has all the traffic moved out to Liffey Valley and the like? It seems to me that a new movie theatre in the centre of the city would be a license to print money. Thanks. DB.

http://www.darrenbarefoot.com
TheFoot is offline  
Advertisement
25-02-2003, 13:52   #2
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 160
I think there is already enough cinemas in town, with the UGC, Savoy. If the demand was there I'm sure somebody would have built one already.

In the suburbs you have the UCI in Tallaght, Coolock and Blanchardstown. The Ster Century in Clondalkin/Lucan. Theres cinemas in Dun Laoghaire and Bray and many more around so people don't have to go into town to see a movie
Hugs-E is offline  
25-02-2003, 13:57   #3
Bard
Registered User
 
Bard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 11,982
Send a message via Yahoo to Bard Send a message via Skype™ to Bard
Well yeah the Carlton has closed down and the Ambassador is now more a concert venue than a cinema, but Dublin still has... *deep breath*...

The Classic, Bray
The IMC, Dún Laoighaire
The IFC, Temple Bar
The Ormonde, Stillorgan
The Omniplex, Santry
The Savoy, O'Connell Street
The Screen, D'Olier St.
The Stella, Rathmines
The Ster Century (12 screens, including the biggest one in Europe), Liffey Valley complex, Lucan
UCI Cinemas in Blanchardstown, Coolock and Tallaght
UGC (used to be Virgin Cinema) at the Parnell Centre, Parnell Street

and some other small ones...

... is that not enough?
Bard is offline  
25-02-2003, 14:37   #4
shotamoose
Registered User
 
shotamoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,402
I think the point he was making is why aren't there more in 'downtown' Dublin? Which is a valid one, imho. Would I be right in saying there's no mainstream cinema (ie excluding the IFC) south of the river before you get to Harold's Cross?
shotamoose is offline  
25-02-2003, 14:40   #5
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 160
The Screen in D'olier Street / Townsend Street
Hugs-E is offline  
Advertisement
25-02-2003, 14:52   #6
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 13
Downtown cinemas

Take a look at downtown first-run cinemas:

The Screen, D'Olier St.
UGC
The Savoy, O'Connell Street

That's 19 screens to satisfy a large population that, on average, watches a lot of movies. Furthermore, as I indicated in another thread, the UGC and the Savoy show the same films. So, in reality, there are about 8-10 first-run films on in the centre of the city. These films regularly sell out. Furthermore, my experience in other countries indicates that you don't need regular sell-outs to make a cinema profitable.

With a new cinema you could offer the consumer more choice, better screens, a cleaner theatre and a shorter drive. DB.
TheFoot is offline  
25-02-2003, 14:57   #7
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,147
Don't forget that this is not just a case of people not opening up new cinemas due to start-up costs etc. There were lots of other cinemas in town when I was younger. They already had the equipment (i.e. projectors, screens, etc.) yet they still closed down. It's not as straight forward as sold-out movies = demand for more cinemas, otherwise all those cinemas would still be open. Bare in mind that it wasn't just the small cinemas that closed, the Adelphi and Carlton were rivals to the Savoy in their day, yet they still eventually closed down.
Johnmb is offline  
25-02-2003, 15:08   #8
Mr E
Administrator
 
Mr E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 49,319
I'm really interested to know how cinemas actually work.
  • I assume movies are rented by cinemas (not bought). How much it cost? Who do you rent from? Would I be right in saying that the rental cost of a movie is proportionate to the capacity of the screen its shown in?
  • What percentage of actual box office takings are cinemas entitled to (if any?). I've heard that cinemas make the bulk of their money from popcorn etc. Is this true?
Just curious.... I'd love to open a cinema of my own one day....

- Dave.
Mr E is offline  
25-02-2003, 15:18   #9
hussey
Registered User
 
hussey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 6,133
Send a message via MSN to hussey
well I not 100% sure

but as far as I know the cinema must pay the film company
for every customer

hence the more customers teh more money a film makes

and yes a cinema will make a healthy profit margin on food

but dont forget they have alot of over heads

... they might not be a rich as you think
last year or the year before they scrapped the idea of 10 screen cineama in swords (near the pavilion) as it was just not viable
hussey is offline  
Advertisement
25-02-2003, 15:19   #10
Victor
Registered User
 
Victor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 73,347
Part of the problem was the oligopoly where the Savoy, Carlton, Screen (O'Connell Bridge and D'Olier St.) were all owned by the same company (not sure about the Lighthouse and Ambassador). Once UCI started eating into their marketshare, they consolidated. Of course when the boom came they were left in an awkward position with the disused sites needing big investment which could just as easily go into other uses.

These days the main problem is that the cinemas are competing with other uses, mainly retail and commercial, for sites. Redevelopment at the ILAC and the Carlton site may bring new cinemas.

Other cinemas were at The Lighthouse and ???? (Abbey Street) Penney's (Royal?) and Ulster Bank on O'Connell Street, Stephen's Green (Green), Cabra (now a bingo hall), Crumlin (now a bingo hall?), Fairview (now a tile shop), Whitehall (now a bingo hall), Buckingham Street (became a bingo hall, now an office block), Pearse Street (TCD have bought it), Glenageary. I suspect the Ice Rinks that had been in Dolphin's Barn and Phibsboro were originally cinemas. I suspect there had been cinemas in Finglas and Fairview. Logic would indicate one in Ringsend and Ballyfermot.

Cork underwent a similar rationalisation in the 1980s and then growth through the 1990s.

Quote:
The Classic, Bray
The Classic is in Harolds Cross, The Royal is in Bray.

Last edited by Victor; 25-02-2003 at 15:27.
Victor is offline  
25-02-2003, 15:19   #11
pickarooney
Moderator
 
pickarooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 31,358
I reckon the advent of video in the 80s not only killed the radio star, but made a lot of the city-centre cinemas unprofitable, but the novelty eventually wore off and there was a huge increase in attendances throughout the 90s, to the extent that anyone opening a new cinema went for it on a large scale and so set up in the suburbs, where land is somewhat cheaper and more available, and where, I suppose, the majority of people now live in Dublin? This doesn't explain the Virgin/UGC's apparent success though. Actually, I don't know if Virgin was that successful as they sold up shop rather quickly.
pickarooney is online now  
25-02-2003, 15:34   #12
Victor
Registered User
 
Victor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 73,347
Quote:
Originally posted by pickarooney
This doesn't explain the Virgin/UGC's apparent success though. Actually, I don't know if Virgin was that successful as they sold up shop rather quickly.
Virgin took it's time, as it was off the beaten track and the layout isn't ideal. It's real success came when it introduced season tickets. I suspect the number of times people use these tickets is relatively firm and allows them to better manage staff (but they could still do with more people selling tickets). Sales of snacks is one of the few variable costs they have. In their own way, rent, staff and tickets costs are fixed.


Virgin sold all it's cinemas to UGC, not just it's Irish one.
Victor is offline  
25-02-2003, 16:05   #13
shotamoose
Registered User
 
shotamoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,402
Quote:
Originally posted by Hugs-E
The Screen in D'olier Street / Townsend Street
D'oh, of course. And I go there quite a bit too. Sheesh.
shotamoose is offline  
25-02-2003, 16:42   #14
davej
Knuthy!
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 1,165
Maybe it's just me but I've noticed an increase in the number of people going to the UGC in Parnell St. in recent months. This area of the city has changed a lot in terms of demographics even over the past year.

I have to say that generally I'm happy with the number of cinemas and choice of movies we get in Dublin.

The one area that's lacking IMO is a proper retrospective Cinema. I know the IFC shows a handful every month but I believe there would be a market out there for more old films to be shown. Over the past 2 or 3 months tons of new quality films have been released but often we go through a slow patch and this is where a Cinema showing older classics could make a killing.
Something along the lines of the Prince Charles Cinema in London.
Perhaps the cost/hassle in securing old films makes this unviable?

Wasn't there talk of a Cinema club using the facilities in Denzille lane ?
Has anyone got any information about this?

http://www.13denzille.com/facts.htm

davej
davej is offline  
25-02-2003, 17:07   #15
ballooba
Registered User
 
ballooba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 6,235
Roll on EasyCinemas ala EasyJet. Or maybe our own flavour from Mr O'Leary?
ballooba is offline  
Thread Closed

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search