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20-03-2020, 08:29   #1
KildareP
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Covid-19: Netflix to reduce streaming quality in Europe for 30 days

What think ye of this?
https://www.rte.ie/news/2020/0319/1124244-netflix-eu/

Essentially Netflix have stated they will cut bitrates by ~25% in Europe, I assume by not letting EU customers hit the top tier of the adaptive streaming bitrate ladder for each of the different profiles they have for SD, HD, 4K and HDR, for the next 30 days.

On the one hand, I imagine that Netflix streaming traffic is through the roof at the moment given everyone working at home so traffic is likely to be significantly up both in volume and the length of the day.

On the other hand, because of the way Netflix aims to get content to the end user, by offering a free content cache server placed inside each country's peering exchange (INEX for Ireland) and also inside the bigger ISP's datacentres (Eir and BT, which includes Sky and possibly still 3 Ireland customers, being two ISP's I know of that have one). The vast majority of Netflix content is thus not actually served from "the internet" at all. Any contention will be at the ISP level as opposed to "the internet" level.


Netflix bitrates weren't industry leading to begin with, although they seem by far the biggest streaming player at least this side of the Atlantic waters so likely to be able to achieve greatest impact in reducing anything they can, so I'm wondering how this will further impact picture quality and whether it will actually make a difference at all?
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20-03-2020, 08:35   #2
silver2020
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It's not a netflix issue.

All streaming services have been asked to reduce the bandwidth used where possible.

Netflix are complying with this request and should be congratulated for doing so and hopefully all other services that cause high usage follow suit.


The "superfast Highway" will become like the M50 on a wet December morning if some form of downgrading of usage is not implemented.
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20-03-2020, 08:41   #3
KildareP
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It's not a netflix issue.

All streaming services have been asked to reduce the bandwidth used where possible.

Netflix are complying with this request and should be congratulated for doing so and hopefully all other services that cause high usage follow suit.


The "superfast Highway" will become like the M50 on a wet December morning if some form of downgrading of usage is not implemented.
It's not a Netflix issue, that is true, but they were the first to respond, despite being best positioned to already minimise internet traffic globally as it is, for the reasons I outlined above. Netflix - rightly or wrongly - push the majority of the contention into the individual ISP network and off the wider internet.

Google, Amazon and Sky - amongst others - have not yet made any comment.
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20-03-2020, 08:53   #4
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Well, I suppose it couldn't hurt. Netflix are, ironically, hosted in Amazon Cloud (AWS). While, ideally, their output shouldn't affect other people, I suppose it's a case of preventative action. I would imagine that they will all do it.
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20-03-2020, 09:00   #5
lawred2
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Originally Posted by KildareP View Post
It's not a Netflix issue, that is true, but they were the first to respond, despite being best positioned to already minimise internet traffic globally as it is, for the reasons I outlined above. Netflix - rightly or wrongly - push the majority of the contention into the individual ISP network and off the wider internet.

Google, Amazon and Sky - amongst others - have not yet made any comment.
Rightly... They don't push any contention anyway. That content would have to be streamed through the ISP regardless.
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23-03-2020, 06:22   #6
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Ive noticed a lot of professional meeting platforms like Zoom are struggling at peak times, mainly afternoons and evenings when the USA comes online.
Skype still seems fairly solid all the time.
Youtube at times doesn't connect, mainly afternoons and evenings.
I cant imagine the extra network/Internet traffic now from all these world wide people working and socialising from home.
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25-03-2020, 15:50   #7
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Time to adjust down from the 4k plan in the meantime I guess
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25-03-2020, 16:29   #8
KildareP
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Ive noticed a lot of professional meeting platforms like Zoom are struggling at peak times, mainly afternoons and evenings when the USA comes online.
Skype still seems fairly solid all the time.
Youtube at times doesn't connect, mainly afternoons and evenings.
I cant imagine the extra network/Internet traffic now from all these world wide people working and socialising from home.
Zoom seems fairly OK throughout the day for what we're using it for in work which, in fairness, is pretty heavy.

Office365, on the other hand, has effectively sat down around 1PM for the last three days. We rely heavily on OneNote, OneDrive, Teams and Stream and the delays on syncing amongst users is making them very difficult to use in the afternoon.

Skype is still P2P I think, so you connect directly to the person on the other hand rather than relying on a cloud provider in the middle.

Funnily enough, Netflix still seems to be streaming full 4K HDR at the usual 15Mbps for me last night but HD shows are down to around 2Mbps compared to the usual 5Mbps or so.

AppleTV+ has gone full on SD with <2Mbps across the board.
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25-03-2020, 18:49   #9
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Zoom seems fairly OK throughout the day for what we're using it for in work which, in fairness, is pretty heavy.

Office365, on the other hand, has effectively sat down around 1PM for the last three days. We rely heavily on OneNote, OneDrive, Teams and Stream and the delays on syncing amongst users is making them very difficult to use in the afternoon.

Skype is still P2P I think, so you connect directly to the person on the other hand rather than relying on a cloud provider in the middle.

Funnily enough, Netflix still seems to be streaming full 4K HDR at the usual 15Mbps for me last night but HD shows are down to around 2Mbps compared to the usual 5Mbps or so.

AppleTV+ has gone full on SD with <2Mbps across the board.



Teams has been acting the maggot since last week, especially instant message feature.
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25-03-2020, 20:06   #10
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Well, I suppose it couldn't hurt. Netflix are, ironically, hosted in Amazon Cloud (AWS). While, ideally, their output shouldn't affect other people, I suppose it's a case of preventative action. I would imagine that they will all do it.
The limitation is not with AWS, its all last mile.
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26-03-2020, 18:00   #11
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Funnily enough, Netflix still seems to be streaming full 4K HDR at the usual 15Mbps for me last night
....and it’s gone.
7.62 mbps for 4K HDR at the moment.
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26-03-2020, 18:42   #12
Marlow
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The limitation is not with AWS, its all last mile.
Not quite. Some of the content servers also have been struggling, where last mile was fine.

Especially intercontinental.

Netflix also had capacity issues at some nodes and Google have just added 100 Gbit/s to their existing I believe 40 Gbit/s at INEX.

/M
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26-03-2020, 20:05   #13
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Every major content provider have CDNs in the major metros, in Ireland that would most likely just be Dublin. Either on the ISPs network or right beside, at the edge of their own network.
I didn't hear of any ISP calling for the likes of Netflix to reduce possible customer bandwidth usage (unless I missed it), it was coming mostly from politicians who know bugger all. I thought all ISPs went 'sure its grand, we plan for this'
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26-03-2020, 20:10   #14
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My guess is that their afraid their own servers and own bandwidth will be overloaded due to the amount of people at home now and their setup won't be able to handle it.

I think there just protecting themselves really. Also probably huge costs on increasing their bandwith just for this epidemic so may as well just decrease the quality.
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26-03-2020, 22:05   #15
Marlow
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Originally Posted by KeRbDoG View Post
Every major content provider have CDNs in the major metros, in Ireland that would most likely just be Dublin. Either on the ISPs network or right beside, at the edge of their own network.
I didn't hear of any ISP calling for the likes of Netflix to reduce possible customer bandwidth usage (unless I missed it), it was coming mostly from politicians who know bugger all. I thought all ISPs went 'sure its grand, we plan for this'
Netflix had issues with buffering due to capacity issues on their own servers in Ireland, which actually wasn't access related. But that only started about 2-3 days before they anyhow were asked to decrease bandwidth, so they fixed the problem that way .. for now.

This sort of c*** usually only hits the fan, when it's consistent for more than a week across the board. People will first try to troubleshoot their own setup, seeing that for example Youtube or another service still is working flawless. Then contact either Netflix or their provider. And only as the problem persists, it becomes commonly known.

Google turned around .. and while they also decreased quality on video streams (Youtube, Google Video), they knew, they were on the limits here in Ireland before COVIT-19 hit. So their upgrade came timed just about right.

They have 20 Gbit/s each on LAN#1 and LAN#2 of INEX. An extra 100 Gbit/s on LAN#1 went live today or yesterday. And LAN#2 is also awaiting another 100 Gbit/s coming online. There's a reason for that. And it's not access congestion.

/M

Last edited by Marlow; 26-03-2020 at 22:09.
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