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06-06-2018, 00:06   #1
mufc1993
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Coding

Hi

I am looking to become proficient at code with a view to teaching it in the near future. I am a complete beginner in it at the moment.

I'm wondering where would be the best place to start? If someone had a rough idea of a scheme of work for coding that would be great. Have heard Scratch is the best to start with anyways before getting on to the more difficult stuff.
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06-06-2018, 06:51   #2
frankston
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Hi

I am looking to become proficient at code with a view to teaching it in the near future. I am a complete beginner in it at the moment.

I'm wondering where would be the best place to start? If someone had a rough idea of a scheme of work for coding that would be great. Have heard Scratch is the best to start with anyways before getting on to the more difficult stuff.
What sort of teaching ? Coder dojo or third level?
As this will dictate what you mean by proficiency .

Do you plan to do this full-time or part-time?

Have you already got a degree? What's your current level of education?

If you have no programming experience your first language will be the hardest after that new languages become a lot easier and faster to learn.

From a complete beginner scenerio I would expect a good student to have a good level of object oriented programming knowledge/capability in Java in about 18 months of full-time study

Of course different people will have different views of what good / proficient means

Regards
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06-06-2018, 09:56   #3
mufc1993
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What sort of teaching ? Coder dojo or third level?
As this will dictate what you mean by proficiency .

Do you plan to do this full-time or part-time?

Have you already got a degree? What's your current level of education?

If you have no programming experience your first language will be the hardest after that new languages become a lot easier and faster to learn.

From a complete beginner scenerio I would expect a good student to have a good level of object oriented programming knowledge/capability in Java in about 18 months of full-time study

Of course different people will have different views of what good / proficient means

Regards
Sorry forgot to mention its for second level.

Have a degree and master of education at the moment.

Would be hoping to teach myself over the summer really.
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06-06-2018, 11:50   #4
amp123
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Code Academy may be a good place to start as well. Do you know which language(s) they are planning to have on the curriculum?
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06-06-2018, 13:56   #5
frankston
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Sorry forgot to mention its for second level.

Have a degree and master of education at the moment.

Would be hoping to teach myself over the summer really.
If it's for the new leaving cert CS curriculum I would go with Python, in my view scratch is more primary level. Python is also very popular and has lots of related online courses. Its used a lot in the UK at secondary level which means you can access teaching resources and related concepts at an appropriate for junior/leaving cert.
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06-06-2018, 14:04   #6
Tom Dunne
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If it's for the Leaving Cert Computer Science, then it's most likely Python you need.

+1 for Code Academy.
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06-06-2018, 14:08   #7
mufc1993
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Thanks folks.

And if I was focusing more on a junior cycle short course on coding what would be most appropriate would you think?

Last edited by mufc1993; 06-06-2018 at 14:09. Reason: Typo
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06-06-2018, 14:12   #8
Tom Dunne
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Thanks folks.

And if I was focusing more on a junior cycle short course on coding what would be most appropriate would you think?
Scratch is always the first port of call for younger students. While us purists might balk at the idea of drag-and-drop programming, it is easy to learn and visually appealing things can be generated with relatively little effort. Exactly what the kids want!
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06-06-2018, 19:47   #9
byhookorbycrook
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I'd imagine secondary students wouldn't be impressed with Scratch as it's done at primary level in so many places now.
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06-06-2018, 19:56   #10
 
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I'd imagine secondary students wouldn't be impressed with Scratch as it's done at primary level in so many places now.
I'd echo that, I ran a scratch course this year and a few weren't far behind me. In saying that the level of ability was very mixed. Maybe start out with the concepts in scratch (loops, motion, costume etc) and then jump in to python. It would depend on how far you want to take it (or how far the school will be taking it!).In another part of the country it might be a completely different profile.
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07-06-2018, 12:03   #11
RealJohn
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I'd imagine secondary students wouldn't be impressed with Scratch as it's done at primary level in so many places now.
Can’t speak for everyone, obviously, but my students enjoy Scratch, even those who’ve seen it before.
Maybe not one for a whole course but I think most students will engage with it for a while.
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07-06-2018, 12:16   #12
denartha
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Can’t speak for everyone, obviously, but my students enjoy Scratch, even those who’ve seen it before.
Maybe not one for a whole course but I think most students will engage with it for a while.
What age are your students though?
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07-06-2018, 12:24   #13
Arlessienne
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We ran Scratch modules with 1st, 2nd and TY last year. No students had done it before. Some liked it, some hated it.
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07-06-2018, 12:37   #14
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Scratch is great for younger kids because it uses the basic programming constructs and they can get something visually up and running in no time.

But if you're going to be teaching programming then learning a 'real' language would be better.

Python would be a good choice. Also consider JavaScript (although JavaScript is an easy language to be very bad at for a beginner). Otherwise consider c# or Java; both of these have great tooling and online resources.

CodeAcademy is a good free learning resources, but also look at PluralSight or Udemy. Good course content by a good tutor is half the battle.
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07-06-2018, 13:09   #15
denartha
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Can i suggest when posters say "younger kids" they add context as to what age group they mean. In my experience 6-10 year olds love scratch. Many people 12+ roll their eyes at it because "its lame".

Python is the way to go in my opinion. I do security monitoring at a bank and use python daily. Python has real world uses, scratch does not.
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