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09-05-2017, 16:59   #1
m_stan
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Where to fly a drone in Ireland

New to the drone hobby - yes I've jumped on your bandwagon. Just purchased a DJI Mavic Pro, registered it and have read the regulations from the IAAA.

Can someone clarify for me whether it's legal to fly in a public park or not? eg: St Anne's Park, the Phoenix Park, St Stephens Green for example?

If my read of the regulations is correct, it's technically only legal to fly on private land. Is that a good way to think about it?

Any advice on where I can fly within the rules would be much appreciated.

Thanks!
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14-05-2017, 10:47   #2
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You cannot fly anywhere in Phoenix Park, because it's prohibited airspace due to the Aras etc. In the other two parks you mentioned, and indeed anywhere within 15 miles (I think, though it could be 20) of Dublin Airport, you cannot fly above 50 ft - this is called controlled airspace.

You then have the usual limitations of not flying within 30 metres of any person or building and not flying within 120 metres of a congregation of people.

In terms of where it's legal to fly...it's legal to fly anywhere as long as the above is adhered to. If you're taking off from or landing on private land, you need permission from the land owner, but it's perfectly legal to do so on public property as long as you're far enough away from everything as above.

Poster here for common rules: https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...71&oe=59B91CD5
You can use this map to determine if you're in controlled (yellow) or prohibited (red) airspace: https://www.flyryte.com/airspace/

Last edited by MajesticDonkey; 14-05-2017 at 12:16.
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14-05-2017, 17:00   #3
 
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Download an app called airmap handy to use before you even turn on your drone it will check the area your in.

Last edited by deco nate; 14-05-2017 at 17:11.
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15-05-2017, 15:22   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MajesticDonkey View Post
Poster here for common rules: https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...71&oe=59B91CD5

You can use this map to determine if you're in controlled (yellow) or prohibited (red) airspace: https://www.flyryte.com/airspace/
This is very confusing. First link states never flight closer then 5km from any aerodrome, right, ok, but the second link shows Bray (far longer then 5km from Dublin airport), for example, as Class C airspace, which limits you to 15m alt (again according to the website). What is this site anyway? And where does it take the map data from? I could not confirm on IAA site that this area is restricted to 15m to flight drones. Is there an official IAA map to confirm it?

By the way, Flyryte site now offering online course, is it worth taking it? With so many restrictions and rules one can be so easily and genuinely confused.
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15-05-2017, 15:36   #5
MajesticDonkey
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This is very confusing. First link states never flight closer then 5km from any aerodrome, right, ok, but the second link shows Bray (far longer then 5km from Dublin airport), for example, as Class C airspace, which limits you to 15m alt (again according to the website). What is this site anyway? And where does it take the map data from? I could not confirm on IAA site that this area is restricted to 15m to flight drones. Is there an official IAA map to confirm it?

By the way, Flyryte site now offering online course, is it worth taking it? With so many restrictions and rules one can be so easily and genuinely confused.
Nobody can fly within 5 km of any airport. If you're licensed, you can fly with express permission from the IAA. Outside that, usually to 15 miles (this is Class C), anyone can fly without permission, but only up to 15 m (or 50 ft). Outside that again, you can fly pretty much un-restricted - max of 120 m altitude, and 300 m distance from controller to drone.

Unfortunately the IAA don't offer an official online map of Irish airspace - you're forced to buy a hard copy from OSI, which is expensive and just behind the times IMHO. So that FlyRyte online map is an unofficial map, pretty much just as a guide. What's there is accurate though, and while I don't have experience with FlyRyte personally, they have a great reputation in the drone industry here, so if you're interested in learning everything I would recommend the course on reputation alone.
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15-05-2017, 16:38   #6
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Outside that, usually to 15 miles (this is Class C), anyone can fly without permission, but only up to 15 m
I can't find this restriction anywhere on IAA website. Where did you see it?
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15-05-2017, 16:52   #7
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I can't find this restriction anywhere on IAA website. Where did you see it?
U.04
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19-05-2017, 20:25   #8
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The maps in the doc above seem to suggest that only parts of the Phoenix park are a no fly zone. Is it possible to fly outside the marked no fly zone or is the entire park off limits? Thanks!
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19-05-2017, 21:56   #9
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Yeah, looks like the prohibited airspace centres on the Aras with a radius of about 1.8 km, so outside of that it's just a case of staying below 50 ft.
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20-05-2017, 23:20   #10
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Yeah, looks like the prohibited airspace centres on the Aras with a radius of about 1.8 km, so outside of that it's just a case of staying below 50 ft.
Does the Leinster Model Flying Club fly to the west of St. Marys' Hospital? They fly in the Fifteen Acres area, I gather: http://www.leinstermodelflyingclub.ie/about-us.html
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21-05-2017, 08:50   #11
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Does the Leinster Model Flying Club fly to the west of St. Marys' Hospital? They fly in the Fifteen Acres area, I gather: http://www.leinstermodelflyingclub.ie/about-us.html
I've no idea, but based on the map on their website, it's actually inside prohibited airspace, so they likely have an agreement with the IAA to fly there on a regular basis.
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23-05-2017, 20:07   #12
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The mavic may be outside the scope of the IAA regulations if the 1kg threshold is still in place, although might still be if it has metal parts etc.

Last edited by Bruthal; 23-05-2017 at 20:11.
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23-05-2017, 21:19   #13
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The mavic may be outside the scope of the IAA regulations if the 1kg threshold is still in place, although might still be if it has metal parts etc.
That's likely the change pretty quickly, and the laws are there good reason, so people should be looking to follow them unless they have one of these



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03-01-2020, 09:44   #14
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A bit late to the party, but does anyone how to deal with the limitation proposed by OPW on national monuments? Is the the case of "no taking off or landing within our properties", or are they considered restricted airspace?
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09-01-2020, 08:50   #15
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A bit late to the party, but does anyone how to deal with the limitation proposed by OPW on national monuments? Is the the case of "no taking off or landing within our properties", or are they considered restricted airspace?
as far as I know, national monuments are not classified as restricted airspace (unless in regular restricted areas ) and most of them are on private owned land so in theory no extra restrictions apply but... usually there are visitors around so flying over is prohibited. Also, when taking off from outside of the monuments site while on private property, you should get (farmers?) permission to do so.
On the IAA website ( https://www.iaa.ie/general-aviation/drones ) you can find a link to the Heritage.ie website which says 'PLEASE NOTE: THE USE OF DRONES IS NOT PERMITTED AT NATIONAL MONUMENT SITES' and pointing you back to the IAA where is no other heritage sites related info so I'd say that taking off and landing on the site is prohibited, safe flying over is ok

Last edited by stuff.hunter; 09-01-2020 at 08:55.
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