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28-04-2019, 18:24   #1
YIMBY
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Objecting to planning permission that doesn't maximise height/capacity

Would it be feasible to setup a YIMBY group in Dublin that lodges an objection to any development which doesn't maximise the height and/or potential of a site.

I'm sick of people complaining about the housing crisis, homeless, and the cost of renting and buying in Dublin, while simultaneously complaining about any density.

Dublin is a modern capital city. The only way we can do public transport properly and house our people is with higher density.

It's a travesty that we have public representatives and journalists fighting development in the city when people are crying out for more homes.

I don't expect the objections to have any immediate effect, but I want to start a conversation and highlight the issue. I want to change how objections are viewed. I want to object when a site isn't used to it's fullest extent.
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28-04-2019, 18:24   #2
YIMBY
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I wasn't sure which was the most relevant forum so apologies if this is in the wrong place.
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28-04-2019, 20:33   #3
Caranica
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All the Councils have development plans with minimum residential density limits. An application that doesn't meet those will be rejected straight off. You'd be better off making submissions to public consultations when new development plans are prepared if you want to maximise residential density.
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28-04-2019, 20:35   #4
Eric Cartman
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All the Councils have development plans with minimum residential density limits. An application that doesn't meet those will be rejected straight off. You'd be better off making submissions to public consultations when new development plans are prepared if you want to maximise residential density.
is that why all the new build estates are so packed together and you cant find a new house with an actual garden anymore ?
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28-04-2019, 20:42   #5
Caranica
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is that why all the new build estates are so packed together and you cant find a new house with an actual garden anymore ?
Different rules tend to apply for green field and "brown" urban infill sites. But it does vary hugely from Council to Council.
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28-04-2019, 21:09   #6
kceire
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is that why all the new build estates are so packed together and you cant find a new house with an actual garden anymore ?
Kind of.
People are screaming for more housing.
Councils have to increase the density on sites.
It’s why the norm is now skinny house fronts but taller 3 storey developments.

There are also minimum private open space requirements that developers are only meeting the minimum nowadays instead of going above and beyond.
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28-04-2019, 21:12   #7
Eric Cartman
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Kind of.
People are screaming for more housing.
Councils have to increase the density on sites.
It’s why the norm is now skinny house fronts but taller 3 storey developments.

There are also minimum private open space requirements that developers are only meeting the minimum nowadays instead of going above and beyond.
all awful looking and out of proportion in my book, was wondering why so many people were doing such an awful design.
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28-04-2019, 22:53   #8
godtabh
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Kind of.
People are screaming for more housing.
Councils have to increase the density on sites.
It’s why the norm is now skinny house fronts but taller 3 storey developments.

There are also minimum private open space requirements that developers are only meeting the minimum nowadays instead of going above and beyond.
Why would they go above an beyond? They are selling as is. A developer will build what will sell
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28-04-2019, 23:00   #9
jd
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Originally Posted by Caranica View Post
All the Councils have development plans with minimum residential density limits. An application that doesn't meet those will be rejected straight off. You'd be better off making submissions to public consultations when new development plans are prepared if you want to maximise residential density.
I know of a development in Wexford where someone brought an appeal to ABP. There were loads of grounds of appeal, all thrown out, except the one on density. The people making the appeal said that it was too dense for the area. However ABP said that even though it was in line with the development guidelines by Wexford Co Co, it was not in line with government guidelines. So the developer will be back with plans for more units on the site. Backfired on the people who made the appeal.
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29-04-2019, 12:23   #10
Ray Palmer
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So the idea would be to set up a group that live in the area of a build or a just a group that tries to override the locals?
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29-04-2019, 16:26   #11
Old diesel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caranica View Post
All the Councils have development plans with minimum residential density limits. An application that doesn't meet those will be rejected straight off. You'd be better off making submissions to public consultations when new development plans are prepared if you want to maximise residential density.
I know of a development in Wexford where someone brought an appeal to ABP. There were loads of grounds of appeal, all thrown out, except the one on density. The people making the appeal said that it was too dense for the area. However ABP said that even though it was in line with the development guidelines by Wexford Co Co, it was not in line with government guidelines. So the developer will be back with plans for more units on the site. Backfired on the people who made the appeal.
So ABP are actually rejecting for INSUFFICIENT density?????
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30-04-2019, 09:37   #12
astrofool
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is that why all the new build estates are so packed together and you cant find a new house with an actual garden anymore ?
You see a lot of mixed developments now, with apartments and houses being built together, if they could go higher with the apartment blocks, then the need for skinny houses and tiny gardens is diminished, our restriction on heights is forcing low rise high density housing.
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