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25-08-2011, 13:32   #1
GeneralLeeBike
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Mountbatten's Death

Hi guys.I know this sounds a bit weird but does anyone remember or know where roughly where Mountbattens boat was blown up?i know it was in Mullaghmore,but does anyone know anything more about the location?
And if anyone has any pictures of Mullaghmore back then I'd love to see them.just because i spend most of my summer up there.

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25-08-2011, 15:20   #2
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CMod EDIT:

If anyone has anything USEFUL or RELEVANT to help out the OP, please post.

Dades

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25-08-2011, 17:22   #3
 
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Not useful but I'd like to see the thread renamed Mountbatten's Murder.
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25-08-2011, 18:04   #4
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Originally Posted by GeneralLeeBike View Post
Hi guys.I know this sounds a bit weird but does anyone remember or know where roughly where Mountbattens boat was blown up?i know it was in Mullaghmore,but does anyone know anything more about the location?

Thanks
Mullaghmore is in a tiny village in Co. Sligo. There is no pub in it but there is a bar in the hotel. Don't know if Mountabtten ever drank in it though.
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26-08-2011, 00:49   #5
 
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To my knowledge Mountbatten's boat ( Shadow V ) was 200 - 300 metres from the entrance to the harbour when it was blown up.

I'm told that after the criminal proceedings the wreckage was destroyed at the request of the British Government ( cannot verify this though ).

Last edited by Delancey; 26-08-2011 at 23:55. Reason: spelling - doh !
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26-08-2011, 22:13   #6
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Where his boat was exactly seems a peculiar interest. His death seems to have been against the communities spirit in the Mullaghmore area. Most accounts I have seen suggest that the family kept to themselves in the area and were liked by anyone who dealt with them. Here is a small piece from Sligo heritage:
Quote:
Little snippets of casual gossip circulated. The Irish Boy Scouts who often camped in the woods on Classiebawn castle grounds flew the Tricolour over their camp:

“Did ye hear Mountbatten and the wife were driving out the road in their car? Lady Mountbatten saw the tricolour and was complaining that it shouldn’t be flown on their property?”

“Go on!”

“Aye, the chauffeur heard her, but Mountbatten said to her, ‘why shouldn’t they fly it, it might be our property, but it’s their country’”

http://www.sligoheritage.com/archmbatten.htm
There was a program on this week about the killing and his Garda bodyguard and local boatkeepers were interviewed at length. They were favourable towards him. The Garda description of how he could not believe his eyes as the boat blew up as it went out was very interesting. There were also interviews with the father of a local teenager who was also killed. The boys father is involved in cross border peace initiatives recently. His description of how when his sons body was on the shore that he kept trying to resucitate him even though he new he was dead was quite moving.

Quote:
John Maxwell, Paul Maxwell’s father, said he has tried to meet Thomas McMahon, the only man convicted of bombing the boat, since he was released from prison in August 1998 as part of the Good Friday Agreement. He was jailed for life in November 1979.

“I like to think that there’s no such thing as a completely evil person and that there’s good in everybody,” he said. “If I could see enough in Thomas McMahon if I did meet him it would, in some strange way, make it a bit easier for me. But he doesn’t want to meet me so that will probably never arise.”

Speaking to The Sunday Times, Maxwell said his “door is still open” to McMahon. “I have tried to meet him on two occasions through intermediaries but you never know — it’s still a possibility,” he said.

Maxwell said that when his son originally took the summer job on Mountbatten’s boat he had some concerns about his safety. “But Paul was so keen I thought if someone wanted to take Mountbatten they could do it without taking small kids or anybody else with him. I thought the risk didn’t seem all that serious.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle6797845.ece
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26-08-2011, 22:33   #7
 
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I worked with a lady, 20 or so years ago, that did a bit of interior decor work for the Mountbattens. She loved them and was devastated when they were killed.

When the man convicted had the same name as her, she couldn't handle the shame and moved to England, where I met her later.

Such a pointless killing.
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27-08-2011, 08:39   #8
 
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I have always thought Mountbatten's killing was senseless and even his title was makey upey and wasn't he really Prince Louis of Battenberg relocated German princeling and uncle to the Duke of Edinburgh.It is not like the British monarchy has any real power.

I saw the pictures of the teenagers killed with him in the media at the time and they made an impression on me. They were kids and I was a kid when it happened.

He had been a senior British officer as First Sea Lord and Viceroy of India and he was an old man when he was killed. He had a substantive role in the partition of India.

In 1974 you also had the murder of Senator Billy Fox , former TD for Monaghan and a protestant by the Provisional IRA. That was highly significant as he was a member of the Oireachtas. The kidnapping of Tiede Herrema a Dutch Businessman was also significant.



http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/d...00/2539461.stm

In 1981 Ben Dunne junior was kidnapped by the IRA and in 1984 another supermarket executive Don Tidey kidnapped and 2 young members of the security forces killed in a shootout when the kidnappers hideout was found.

http://www.independent.ie/national-n...out-48866.html

It was hard to distinguish those from Jennifer Guinesses kidnapping by a criminal gang led by a career criminal.

http://www.sbpost.ie/newsfeatures/dr...ice-49553.html

Armed bank robberies etc by the Provisionals in the South were also commonplace.Art robberies too, Ireland was not safe.

http://www.rte.ie/news/2001/0626/paintings2.html

So in that way, Mountbatten knew there was a risk to him and would have been stupid not to. I have often wondered what his connection was to Sligo and how come he has a holiday home there.

Last edited by CDfm; 27-08-2011 at 08:52.
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27-08-2011, 12:03   #9
 
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Here is a pic of the boat



Tne surviving twin of Mountbattens twin grandsons has written a book on it From a Clear Blue Sky
Quote:

Earl Mountbatten's grandson finally tells his story of survival and loss

Timothy Knatchbull, who was 14 when an IRA bomb exploded in the boat on which he was travelling with his grandfather Earl Mountbatten, is to tell his story for the first time.



Tim Walker. Edited by Richard Eden

10:00PM BST 01 May 2009


Knatchbull was seriously injured in the 1979 atrocity in Mullaghmore, Co Sligo, in which his twin brother, Nicholas, was killed along with Lord Mountbatten, Baroness Brabourne and Paul Maxwell, a 15-year-old boy who was working as a crew member.

He has now written a memoir, From a Clear Blue Sky, which will be published on Aug 27, the 30th anniversary of the attack.

"Tim's motivation for writing it was a personal journey of healing and reconciliation, and also of finding out what happened," says Caroline Gascoigne, the publishing director of Hutchinson, which has bought the rights to the book for an undisclosed sum.

"Part of the book is an anatomy of an assassination and it's almost like a detective story as he assembles who was doing what and where. It's also a story about twinhood, and about losing someone whom you have barely spent a day apart from in your life."

She adds: "It's a gripping read from a factual and a psychological point of view, and it's a redemptive book, not a grim one

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...-and-loss.html
Here is a more detailed summary of events in a book review and as it was on a boat locations will never be that precise.


Quote:
'On the morning of Monday, August 27, 1979, Paul Maxwell asked me the time. He laughed when I told him it was eleven thirty-nine and forty seconds.'

Thus begins Timothy Knatchbull’s painstakingly researched, personal and often moving account of an event which made headlines around the world.

Less than ten minutes later, at 11.46, Shadow V, the pleasure boat carrying Earl Mountbatten, twins Timothy and Nicolas Knatchbull, their parents John and Patricia Brabourne, their grandmother the Dowager Lady Brabourne and Paul Maxwell, the boat boy from Enniskillen, was blown to smithereens just off Mullaghmore Head by a bomb planted by the IRA.

Timothy’s grandfather, Earl Mountbatten died instantly, as did Timothy’s identical twin brother Nicolas (aged 14) and Paul Maxwell (aged 15). The Dowager Lady Brabourne died of her injuries the following day.

At the same time, Francis McGirl, driver of a red Ford Escort had been flagged down at a checkpoint in Granard, County Offaly. He and his passenger, Thomas McMahon, were held in the local police station. When questioned by Garda James Lohan, McGirl became nervous and gave the false name Patrick Rehill.

Knatchbull has pieced together, in meticulous detail, the Shadow V rescue operation in Mullaghmore. Brian Best and Richard Wallace, doctors from Northern Ireland, oversaw the operation and organised transportation for the survivors and the dead back to Mullaghmore harbour and on to Sligo General hospital.

Lord Mountbatten’s body was taken to shore on Edward Dawson’s fourteen-foot rubber Zodiac. Charlie Pearce’s dinghy relayed Timothy Knatchbull’s seriously injured parents and grandmother. Knatchbull himself was aboard Dick and Elizabeth Wood-Martin’s boat which, with its engine spluttering, made slow progress back to harbour.

Paul Maxwell’s body arrived on Gus Mulligan’s boat, where it was discovered by Paul’s distraught father, John Maxwell. Patricia Brabourne’s dog Twiga also perished and was recovered. But at this point in the book there is no mention of what became of Knatchbull’s twin brother Nicolas, still missing.

At Sligo general hospital Dr Tony Heenan led a small team of doctors and nurses, handling the emergency efficiently and sympathetically. When they were well enough, Timothy and Patricia Brabourne were told that Nicolas had died. Patricia later described it as 'the worst moment of my life'. She decided she did not have the strength even to think about it and that she would deal with it once she had a bit more life in her.

A family friend, Sylvia Crathorne, who came to Classiebawn to support the wounded while family members attended the funeral of Lord Mountbatten, Lady Brabourne and Nicholas Knatchbull in England wrote to her sister:

'I can’t tell you how devastating, how moving, how heartrending this nightmare is. It’s impossible really to describe what a bomb victim looks like – not so as to let the other person feel the full sickening horror.'

Dr Heenan went beyond the call of duty to comfort Norton Knatchbull, the Brabourne’s eldest son who had arrived from England to be with his brothers and sisters. He grabbed a bottle of whiskey and took Norton into one of the drawing rooms at Classiebawn castle, emerging later to warn that 'there should be no more stiff upper lips here'.

As well as detailed accounts of the trial of McMahon and McGirl, the author analyses the inadequate security surrounding Mountbatten and his family. He assesses the IRA’s motives in targeting Mountbatten and describes the complex nature of support for the Republican movement among the population of Ireland in 1979, quoting both Gerry Adams and John Hume.

http://www.culturenorthernireland.or...clear-blue-sky


So for a factual account from one of the victims that would be what to read, though, I imagine the Queen will pop up every so often.

Last edited by CDfm; 27-08-2011 at 12:22.
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27-08-2011, 14:37   #10
 
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Since you mentioned Mountbatten's cousin the Queen, does anyone know if his death had anything to do with his cousin giving the commanding officer of the para's on Bloody Sunday Derry an OBE
Those awards are chosen by politicians. and more than likely the Cabinet of Jim Callaghan who was suceeded by Margaret Thatcher in May of 1979.

Hardly a reason to kill two 14 year old boys who were as much of a target.

As the Maxwell boys father said

Quote:
Maxwell said that when his son originally took the summer job on Mountbatten’s boat he had some concerns about his safety. “But Paul was so keen I thought if someone wanted to take Mountbatten they could do it without taking small kids or anybody else with him. I thought the risk didn’t seem all that serious.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle6797845.ece
Thats Dad talk and as a Dad it resounds with me


Though I can see how it might have caused Warrenpoint

Quote:
and the Provos killing 19 Para's in Warrenpoint also that day ?
And Warrenpoint isn't in the OP.
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27-08-2011, 14:47   #11
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Those awards are chosen by politicians. and more than likely the Cabinet of Jim Callaghan who was suceeded by Margaret Thatcher in May of 1979.

Hardly a reason to kill two 14 year old boys who were as much of a target.

As the Maxwell boys father said



Thats Dad talk and as a Dad it resounds with me


Though I can see how it might have caused Warrenpoint



And Warrenpoint isn't in the OP.
Agreed, the murder of the two young boys was unacceptable, no excuses of "collatoral damage" etc are good enough. It was triggered by a line of sight device, a remote control for a toy plane by a guy from Monaghan called Tommy McMahon.
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27-08-2011, 14:52   #12
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Forgive my obvious statement but the OP asked for the location of the boat when it blew up, not opinions and random other events of the last 30 odd years!

It was just outside the mouth of the harbour OP, from what the documentaries say.
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27-08-2011, 15:07   #13
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Forgive my obvious statement but the OP asked for the location of the boat when it blew up, not opinions and random other events of the last 30 odd years!

It was just outside the mouth of the harbour OP, from what the documentaries say.

The OP query is in relation to the death of Mountbatten. This forum is for the discussion of history, not just clarifying exact details. Discussion of the event in historical terms as has taken place in the forum is entirely valid. If you wish to engage in this discussion then you are welcome to do so. If you think the discussion should be restricted to one point only then this will not be the case.

Moderator.
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27-08-2011, 15:34   #14
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He had been a senior British officer as First Sea Lord and Viceroy of India and he was an old man when he was killed. He had a substantive role in the partition of India.
I don't want to turn this thread into a debate about the partition of India, but many in India took schadenfreude* at his death as they blamed him as one of the leading figures in the British engineering of the partition of the country and the subsequent deaths of at least a million people and vastly more refugees.

* enjoying someone’s misfortune
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27-08-2011, 15:36   #15
 
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Originally Posted by HellsAngel View Post
Agreed, the murder of the two young boys was unacceptable, no excuses of "collatoral damage" etc are good enough. It was triggered by a line of sight device, a remote control for a toy plane by a guy from Monaghan called Tommy McMahon.
+1

It was a bit more than 1 guy.

http://www.independent.ie/opinion/an...st-475940.html


And I did know veterans of the War of Independence who were not impressed and it did have an impact on the political scene -though that is almost current affairs.

It should not overshadow the boys deaths.



EDIT - An Indian thread might make good reading

Last edited by CDfm; 27-08-2011 at 15:39.
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