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12-03-2019, 16:35   #16
L1011
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Originally Posted by Nobodysrobots View Post
How much does it cost though?
Is it a council leasehold (the first council houses sold off were retained as leasehold) or a private owner?

Council leaseholds generally have fixed ground rents of effectively shiny buttons - my brother's house was 25c/year. DCC had not collected it in decades for obvious reasons! To buy it out was something like 10 years ground rent + DCCs solicitors fees + land registry fees, less than a grand I think all sold. Council leaseholds have to be dealt with this way; they are not covered by the other scheme

Private owners - there is strict regulation on this, you can force a sale via arbitration if required. I believe 20x annual rent is the usual arbitration settlement amount but its hard enough to find recent info on this and its been a long time since I knew anyone that did it. It does not accelerate the shorter the time left on the lease like it does in the UK.


As goes the poster saying it has to be very old - they were banned in 1978; and weren't uncommon until then on new builds. My own house is 1972 built and was bought out in 1998; looking at landdirect I'm one of the very few freeholders in the estate!
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12-03-2019, 17:18   #17
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You should read this.

https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-...eland-1.669994

And take the advice of your solicitor.

Most likely there is nothing wrong with this title.
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12-03-2019, 19:01   #18
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My solicitor emailed me back and said the leasehold is with the builder of the initial development when it was build in the early 1970’s.

Never explained anymore........ not sure if this is good or bad. I will chase him up about it more tomorrow by phone. He started again in the email nothing to worry about. That might be fair enough but I’d like to know if the option is there to buy the freehold of the house and how we go about it, which he still hasn’t answered!
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12-03-2019, 19:02   #19
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How much does it cost though?
I will be honest can't remember exactly but it was under 200 euro
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12-03-2019, 19:08   #20
 
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Originally Posted by cormac_byrne View Post
There is a scheme that gives you the right to purchase the leasehold at a fair price, your solicitor should know about it.

https://www.citizensinformation.ie/e...ound_rent.html

https://www.prai.ie/guidelines-for-g...rchase-scheme/

This is the best only link I could find on the price,
it means that the leaseholder can't hold you to ransom for a ridiculous figure

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/...ules-1.1294537

If more than 15 years remain on the lease, or the tenancy is yearly, the cost of buying out the ground rent cannot exceed an amount which, if invested in the most recent long-term Government Stock, would produce an annual gross interest equal to the amount of the rent under the lease or tenancy.

...

However, if the lease has run its full term, the cost is based on the value of the property - typically one-eighth of the value of the house.
I read that Irish times article before you wrote that. I’m confused by government stock? Dies she mean a bond?

Couldn’t be that much anyway.
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12-03-2019, 19:08   #21
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Judging by the experiences of people here, I’m guessing it won’t be too costly to sort out hopefully.
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12-03-2019, 19:37   #22
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Judging by the experiences of people here, I’m guessing it won’t be too costly to sort out hopefully.
Yeah but there'll be a cost for the solicitors fees for the sign over...
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12-03-2019, 19:40   #23
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Yeah but there'll be a cost for the solicitors fees for the sign over...
I purchased my freehold directly so don't always have to go through a solicitor.
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12-03-2019, 19:42   #24
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Does it make a difference if the leasehold is through county council or private such as builder? Was it straightforward enough to do it yourself?

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I purchased my freehold directly so don't always have to go through a solicitor.
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12-03-2019, 20:19   #25
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Does it make a difference if the leasehold is through county council or private such as builder? Was it straightforward enough to do it yourself?
Completely different systems, two different legal concepts for it. Council is likely to be cheaper. You approach the holding council or its successor (Dublin County Council is the only one with multiple legal successors, dissolved town/borough/city councils revert to the city; as does the Tipperary merger)
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12-03-2019, 20:26   #26
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It’s leased to 3 different companies as per solicitor email and then to a persons address in Dublin.

It states from what I can make out on it thag no washing allowed out unless it’s on a patio, no fencing in the back garden. This was dated in 1971 so not sure if this still applies. House next door had a huge wooden fence?

Solicitor seems to be very causal about it. Am I just being over picky about it all?

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Completely different systems, two different legal concepts for it. Council is likely to be cheaper. You approach the holding council or its successor (Dublin County Council is the only one with multiple legal successors, dissolved town/borough/city councils revert to the city; as does the Tipperary merger)
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12-03-2019, 20:29   #27
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Completely different systems, two different legal concepts for it. Council is likely to be cheaper. You approach the holding council or its successor (Dublin County Council is the only one with multiple legal successors, dissolved town/borough/city councils revert to the city; as does the Tipperary merger)
Mine was very straightforward it was with council.
Sounds like yours might be more complex, make your solicitor work for their money!
How many years are left on your leasehold?
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12-03-2019, 20:33   #28
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Yeah it appears to be very complex.

Solicitor doesn’t want to know from dealing woth him today, he said “of my mothers house was the same” nothing to worry about!

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Mine was very straightforward it was with council.
Sounds like yours might be more complex, make your solicitor work for their money!
How many years are left on your leasehold?
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12-03-2019, 20:51   #29
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If you go onto landdirect.ie and look at a map of the housing estate you will likely find very few freehold houses in the estate. The sky is not falling in. You have a statutory right to buy it which will cost 20 times the ground rent plus fees. You can do it in years to come if you want. If you are otherwise happy with the house it should not be a deal breaker.
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12-03-2019, 20:54   #30
L1011
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Originally Posted by bri007 View Post
It’s leased to 3 different companies as per solicitor email and then to a persons address in Dublin.

It states from what I can make out on it thag no washing allowed out unless it’s on a patio, no fencing in the back garden. This was dated in 1971 so not sure if this still applies. House next door had a huge wooden fence?

Solicitor seems to be very causal about it. Am I just being over picky about it all?
Realistically those covenants aren't going to be enforced at this stage, even if the ground rent is being collected. Sounds like a copy/paste (or re-type, being 1971) of an American "homeowners association" type rulebook - I'd take a stab in the dark at this being a development of larger/nicer for the time houses in South Dublin or North Cork City?

Even if the ground rent is being collected, this is only likely to be an issue when you sell in the future - and then only if its in quite some time. Banks are unlikely to have any issues with >99 years remaining and even frequently >70 is fine.
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