Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
10-01-2021, 19:33   #1
Nqp15hhu
Registered User
 
Nqp15hhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 873
A Career in Meteorology

I have a passion in Meteorology and have had this interest since childhood. This expanded out to my own weather station at about 16 and then a Davis Vantage Pro 2 this summer.

I went on to study Meteorology in England and have attained a Bachelors degree in the subject, in July of 2019.

Since graduating I have had an uphill battle to get a job, searching high and low. In the U.K., there is only about 2 jobs a month, if that. I applied to the Met Office a few times and was always rejected at the Assessment Centre.. what was demotivating was that they take on people without a Meteorology degree so it sort of made my degree look pointless.

I also applied to the Royal Navy (this was the closest I got) and was called 18 times only to give up after realising what I was in for. DTN was the other company I applied to.

So what is becoming clear to me is the lack of jobs in the sector. I search and search for jobs and come across very little. I did manage to gain a temp retail job but this is not where I want to be.

The problem is that these jobs are very competitive and I am competing against some highly qualified individuals. For ex, one job I was rejected had laid off airline pilots with 30 years of service.

I unfortunately did not do my degree with a placement. All of the Met Office placements are for Undergraduates, I have contacted companies looking for work experience and have got nowhere.

I explored alternative avenues such as Internships with UNEP or EUMET but got nowhere there either.

I am looking to get into the industry but have very little ground to gain in terms of advancing my goals or differentiating my portfolio.

It has become quite depressing to continually be looking for jobs and make no headway... I am sitting idle waiting for an opportunity or for the winds to change. Nothing is happening whilst I watch my peers move up in life.

I regret studying this degree.

Last edited by Nqp15hhu; 10-01-2021 at 19:42.
Nqp15hhu is offline  
Advertisement
10-01-2021, 20:22   #2
Gaoth Laidir
Registered User
 
Gaoth Laidir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 6,088
Which degree course was it? I assume it's recognised by the Met Office (a degree is a degree is a degree).

In 1988, while I was in 2nd year in school, I was shown around Met Éireann in Glasnevin by John Doyle, who was one of the RTÉ meteorologists at the time (along with Dr. Aidan Nulty and Gerald Fleming). It was a great experience, seeing Dr. Nulty there at his desk, and it was something I said I wanted to do for a living. However, John told me then that the opportunities in meteorology were getting less and less, normally relying on a retirement for a position to crop up. Advances in automation meant that at some stage in the future (i.e. today) there would be less and less people directly employed. It's for that reason that I didn't pursue it professionaly.

Met Éireann are going through a process of modernising the airport observational station network, with all but Dublin Airport becoming fully automated very soon. That's a whole host of observer jobs gone down the drain.

However, I find it interesting that every week there seems to be some new young voice presenting the 17:59 radio bulletin on my way home. I know that one of these voices is an ex-(or maybe still current)Boardsie, so fair play to him for landing the job.

I don't know how the UKMO work, but the majority of opportunities I would imagine are now in the field of modelling and climate research. Not your bread and butter forecasting or observer jobs but it seems to me to be the way it's headed.
Gaoth Laidir is offline  
(2) thanks from:
10-01-2021, 20:26   #3
ZX7R
Registered User
 
ZX7R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2,846
Never regret learning something.
Maybe you should try a different Avenue but still in meteorology.
Maybe try going down the forecasting route.
Start your own weather profile on Facebook start with local weather forecasting local knowledge is key to been success.
I noted from a previous post on another tread that your knowledge of meteorology is mainly numbers based perhaps there is another course you could find to further expand into meteorology.
Sadly it's a very narrow field you choose as your path but hopefully opportunities will come to you.
ZX7R is offline  
10-01-2021, 20:33   #4
Oneiric 3
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,630
Have you ever applied to more commercial meteorological orgs like Meteogroup or similar?
Oneiric 3 is offline  
10-01-2021, 20:47   #5
Nqp15hhu
Registered User
 
Nqp15hhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oneiric 3 View Post
Have you ever applied to more commercial meteorological orgs like Meteogroup or similar?
Yes that is DTN
Nqp15hhu is offline  
Advertisement
10-01-2021, 20:54   #6
Nqp15hhu
Registered User
 
Nqp15hhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZX7R View Post
Never regret learning something.
Maybe you should try a different Avenue but still in meteorology.
Maybe try going down the forecasting route.
Start your own weather profile on Facebook start with local weather forecasting local knowledge is key to been success.
I noted from a previous post on another tread that your knowledge of meteorology is mainly numbers based perhaps there is another course you could find to further expand into meteorology.
Sadly it's a very narrow field you choose as your path but hopefully opportunities will come to you.
Yes it is very narrow. I didn’t think of alternative avenues when I chose to study the degree.

And the University did not tell us of the poor job opportunities.
Nqp15hhu is offline  
10-01-2021, 20:57   #7
Danno
Moderator
 
Danno's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 6,169
Have you volunteered to be a climatological observer? I know it's an unpaid role, but it can serve to keep your interest alive while you pursue another career. Met Offices are looking for more and more climate observers because many of the existing ones are elderly folk who naturally won't be with us long term into the future. You'd also have a direct contact line with the Climate Division and perhaps if you strike up a good accord with them you might get informed of an upcoming position...
Danno is offline  
10-01-2021, 21:09   #8
Oneiric 3
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nqp15hhu View Post
Yes it is very narrow. I didn’t think of alternative avenues when I chose to study the degree.

And the University did not tell us of the poor job opportunities.
You are obviously very young still and have your whole life ahead of you. Try not to get too despondent as something will turn up eventually. Just keep knocking on those doors!. In the meantime, you could utilise this time by fine tuning your skills, volunteering (as Danno suggested) and perhaps tune up on some statistical computing in Python or R (I would recommend the latter) as this will just add to your skillset and will be greatly beneficial to you in the long run.

Also, and while maybe not the most attractive option to you right now, but it might be worth considering applying to American or European Meteorological orgs as well.
Oneiric 3 is offline  
10-01-2021, 21:13   #9
Nqp15hhu
Registered User
 
Nqp15hhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oneiric 3 View Post
You are obviously very young still and have your whole life ahead of you. Try not to get too despondent as something will turn up eventually. Just keep knocking on those doors!. In the meantime, you could utilise this time by fine tuning your skills, volunteering (as Danno suggested) and perhaps tune up on some statistical computing in Python or R (I would recommend the latter) as this will just add to your skillset and will be greatly beneficial to you in the long run.

Also, and while maybe not the most attractive option to you right now, but it might be worth considering applying to American or European Meteorological orgs as well.
I was thinking of learning Python as I have read up on it. But really I do just want a permanent, full time job now. So looking into other industries.

I need to start earning proper money now.

Not sure I can apply to American organisations. I am not American.
Nqp15hhu is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
10-01-2021, 21:15   #10
Nqp15hhu
Registered User
 
Nqp15hhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danno View Post
Have you volunteered to be a climatological observer? I know it's an unpaid role, but it can serve to keep your interest alive while you pursue another career. Met Offices are looking for more and more climate observers because many of the existing ones are elderly folk who naturally won't be with us long term into the future. You'd also have a direct contact line with the Climate Division and perhaps if you strike up a good accord with them you might get informed of an upcoming position...
I haven’t seen anything, it’s possible... I do need concrete experience.
Nqp15hhu is offline  
10-01-2021, 21:49   #11
zisdead
Registered User
 
zisdead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 22
I can tell you for sure with a degree in Metrology (science based) if you went and did a 1.5 or 2 year conversion course to a masters in Software engineering (no need for a primary degree in computer science) you will walk into any one of fifty American multinationals in Dublin.

The likes of Google go nuts when the see a software engineer with an otherwise quirky primary degree or back story not in software originally.

I did just that (from mechanical engineering) and was making 60K after 2 years. So if a full time job is your main concern that is your route 100%.

Take out a loan if you have to it will pay you back 10 fold in no time.

see this Masters as an example

https://sisweb.ucd.ie/usis/!W_HU_MEN...PROG&MAJR=T195
zisdead is offline  
11-01-2021, 11:30   #12
Nqp15hhu
Registered User
 
Nqp15hhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by zisdead View Post
I can tell you for sure with a degree in Metrology (science based) if you went and did a 1.5 or 2 year conversion course to a masters in Software engineering (no need for a primary degree in computer science) you will walk into any one of fifty American multinationals in Dublin.

The likes of Google go nuts when the see a software engineer with an otherwise quirky primary degree or back story not in software originally.

I did just that (from mechanical engineering) and was making 60K after 2 years. So if a full time job is your main concern that is your route 100%.

Take out a loan if you have to it will pay you back 10 fold in no time.

see this Masters as an example

https://sisweb.ucd.ie/usis/!W_HU_MEN...PROG&MAJR=T195
A lot of people have said this to me. An awful lot of people are going down this route too.

I really need to find something concrete to get a sustainable job.

At the moment it’s all hiring freezes. Any job I apply to where I get even slightly far, the response is “we will get back to you in...”. And that never happens.
Nqp15hhu is offline  
11-01-2021, 13:27   #13
konman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 168
Hi

have you got someone to critique your interview? might be possible you are doing or saying something wrong in interviews. Very common thing to happen. I have interviewed loads of people myself and some people come across very badly in interviews without even knowing it. Im not suggesting this is the case with yourself but worth looking into.
konman is offline  
Thanks from:
11-01-2021, 13:42   #14
Nqp15hhu
Registered User
 
Nqp15hhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by konman View Post
Hi

have you got someone to critique your interview? might be possible you are doing or saying something wrong in interviews. Very common thing to happen. I have interviewed loads of people myself and some people come across very badly in interviews without even knowing it. Im not suggesting this is the case with yourself but worth looking into.
I am atrocious at interviews, due to anxiety. I only got my current job because I was offered a trial.

I wouldn’t have got it if I was interviewed.
Nqp15hhu is offline  
Thanks from:
18-01-2021, 20:16   #15
riffmongous
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 10,735
You would really want a postgraduate qualification to have a good chance of finding something, at least a masters, but even then as you see there isn't a whole lot out there in Ireland or the UK.

Europe is a different story though, do you have a 2nd language? Germany will have a lot more opportunities to find work either at universities (paid postgraduate research) or consulting companies. There's just as much competition of course but you can at least find stuff to apply for.
riffmongous is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet