Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
13-03-2004, 23:03   #16
spongebob
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 6,080
Quote:
Originally posted by Dr. Loon
When you move into a new place. The minute you get in, go around and take pictures - with a time/date stamp - of any damge such as broken tiles, or cracked tiles or windows. Cracked bath/sink etc. If the cooker is a hob job, turn on all 4 rings and make sure they light. Take a picture. Any stains on the carpet. Rising damp. Cracks in the ceiling. Broken radiator knob/turny on things. Take a picture. Take pictures of absolutely everything that could possibly be questioned. You get the idea.

Most decent landlords/estate agents should have an inventory for you to check and sign. If they don't make one up yourself and have them sign it as well.
amen!

M
spongebob is offline  
Advertisement
16-03-2004, 13:23   #17
full forward
Registered User
 
full forward's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 252
Pay the rent on time every month. Don’t be a minute late. Being late with the rent makes landlords nervous. Most landlords must pay a mortgage and your rent is used for this. No rent means no mortgage. The landlord will like you and trust you and is more likely to give you all of your deposit back when you move out of you pay on time.

With regards to carpets - expect to pay up if you spill red wine or coffee on a white carpet. Try to clean it yourself first though. Cigarette burns on furniture are expensive accidents.

Landlords are in the business of making money. They are not St Vincent de Paul.

If you have a dispute with the landlord use the small claims court. Most landlords wont bother to show up which means you win.

I've lived in five different rented houses. Most landlords are ordinary decent people who are terrified that they will get bad tenants.
full forward is offline  
16-03-2004, 13:49   #18
leeroybrown
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 7,430
Whenever I go to see a place (or show a place) I always make a point of talking to whoever is there for a few minutes. I've been both the landlord and tenant and in both cases it's good to try to see what the people are like. You'll go mad if you end up living with people you find annoying.

I always ask how much the bills (Elec, Gas/Oil, etc) normally are throughout the year when I view a place. It's nice to know that you're not moving into a bill nightmare.

I like your checklist idea. Whenever I've rented I've always done up a Pro's - Con's list for the places I've viewed and found it a very good to decide if you 're really getting what you want/need.

I think it's generally worth being patient until you find the right place (if you have the option). It's better in the long run.
leeroybrown is offline  
Thanks from:
24-03-2004, 18:17   #19
Sleepy
Registered User
 
Sleepy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Portrane
Posts: 21,366
If it's not obvious from the layout, ask if there are en-suites on any of the rooms. If there are 4 of you in the house and 1 has an en-suite that cuts it to only 3 of you sharing a bathroom in the morning.

Is the TV Cable/Digital/RTE Only? This'll effect the bills massively.

When's bin day? First apartment I stayed in we didn't know until 2/3 weeks worth of crap were building up in the yard.
Sleepy is online now  
07-09-2004, 14:36   #20
Victor
Registered User
 
Victor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Dublin
Posts: 71,174
Bump.

Any more comments?
Victor is offline  
Advertisement
15-09-2004, 07:42   #21
jd
A Rod Metro
 
jd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Posts: 5,130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epitaph
On the same note, NEVER MOVE IN WITH A COUPLE!!
Bumped for emphasis- the voice of experience.. Especially if the woman is pregnant..

Last edited by jd; 15-09-2004 at 07:47.
jd is offline  
15-09-2004, 08:31   #22
martarg
Registered User
 
martarg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 209
Among the wonderful advice and suggestions I got from this board, one I hadn't thought about, but check that there are no fire stations or ambulance routes nearby... and this might be asking a lot of questions, but who are your neighbours? Any babies or college students? (this may be a good or a bad thing depending on who you are, but I am past the age of joining wild college parties I can't beat ...)
Apart from that, making sure the place has enough storage room, and little details like a window in the kitchen and/or a smoke extractor, enough lighting, plenty of sockets in the right places, a comfortable couch...

Another link...

http://txtx.essortment.com/apartmentrentin_rvru.htm
martarg is offline  
26-11-2004, 20:00   #23
luckat
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 5,315
Eeeeeeeeeeek!

You're terrifying me, because sometimes I rent rooms in my beloved house, to (usually) beloved students of English.

Are they weeing against my shower curtains when I'm not home? Are they contemptuously photographing the broken tiles in my fireplace, and wobbling the iffy window to see could burglars get in? Are they going "pshaw" at my old-fashioned immersion heater and hotpress?

Ewww.
luckat is offline  
Thanks from:
01-01-2005, 16:51   #24
Civilian_Target
Subscriber
 
Civilian_Target's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Boston
Posts: 5,570
Send a message via ICQ to Civilian_Target
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epitaph
Make sure the walls aren't paper-thin i.e. you don't want to hear your housemate giving it loads to some byore on a weeknight, now do you?
Hear hear! - that's the worst situation, especially if they're going like rabbits 4+ times a week.

And make sure that your house mates are approachable enough to deal with a situation like that if it arises too - my priorities would be:

1 - Location
2 - Sound housemates
3 - Decent house

Theres no point in having sound housemates and a decent house if you spend 2 hours a day commuting - you'll just be miserable...
Civilian_Target is offline  
Advertisement
16-05-2005, 17:10   #25
el tel
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: in the Congo drinking umbongo
Posts: 2,926
Twin Rooms

I've seen loads of twin rooms for sharing advertised on daft.ie.
I couldn't imagine anything worse than moving into a room that
already has a human inhabitantliving there.
el tel is offline  
(2) thanks from:
08-05-2006, 14:10   #26
peteym
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 74
Send a message via Skype™ to peteym
Will I get my deposit back?

hi folks- hopefully somebody on here can help me......... I'm planning to live in Dublin City for June, July and August. Because it's only for 3 months I'm not having any success in finding places for that length of time. It's a one bed flat/apartment I'm looking for. I was told I could sign a 6 months/1 year lease and that it would be in my rights to opt out before 6 months and just give the landlord a months notice. Am I entitled to do that and would I get my deposit back???
peteym is offline  
08-05-2006, 16:18   #27
Victor
Registered User
 
Victor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Dublin
Posts: 71,174
A 6-month lease is a 6-month lease. They will try to screw you for any part of the period you don't want to pay for.

Potentially, agree with them that you will take a 3-month lease, but will let them set the ball rolling on getting a new tenant in place for the day after you move out, i.e. you will facilitate viewings, etc.

Alternatively, try to sub-let from a student who has a one year lease and is away for the summer.
Victor is offline  
17-05-2006, 07:35   #28
tman
Registered User
 
tman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Racoon City / London
Posts: 15,828
Quote:
Originally Posted by martarg
Apart from that, making sure the place has enough storage room, and little details like a window in the kitchen and/or a smoke extractor, enough lighting, plenty of sockets in the right places, a comfortable couch...
i can't stress how important that is
i've been living in my current flat for 2 years now and the lack of light in the sitting room is horribly depressing. make sure there are no pillars etc that could possibly block light coming through the windows
tman is offline  
31-05-2006, 19:54   #29
james_d_23
Registered User
 
james_d_23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 41
helps please

im (hopefully) goin to be moving into a rented house with 3 friends for next years college term and was wondering where's the best place to find properties, most people say the internet and if so do any of you know any good sites?

dcu recommended findahome.ie but its not working at the mo for some reason..
I realise im early but i want to know what im doing well in advance, also when do you think would be a good time to start looking, dont want to move in too early but dont want all the decent places gone at the same time.. cheers..
james_d_23 is offline  
01-06-2006, 13:43   #30
addie
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by james_d_23
im (hopefully) goin to be moving into a rented house with 3 friends for next years college term and was wondering where's the best place to find properties, most people say the internet and if so do any of you know any good sites?

dcu recommended findahome.ie but its not working at the mo for some reason..
I realise im early but i want to know what im doing well in advance, also when do you think would be a good time to start looking, dont want to move in too early but dont want all the decent places gone at the same time.. cheers..
daft.ie is hands-down the best place to look. Most landlords only advertise places a fortnight to a month in advance, so if you give yourself one month to look before you need to move in you'll have plenty of time. There's no harm in researching now and keeping an eye on prices in the areas you're interested in, so that you don't rush into anything and end up paying over the odds for the first place that comes along.

In terms of things to look for when viewing places- ventilation!! Especially if you're renting a small flat or sharing with a few people- a vent in every room will help prevent the place from becoming stuffy / damp / musty / smelly.

And ALWAYS keep an eye out for signs of damp; investigate inside wardrobes and behind any furniture that's pressed against walls, run your hand over walls and see if they feel cold or clammy. Air freshners are often a tell-tale sign that the smell of damp is being masked, especially if they're in unusual places. Some landlords will simply paint over damp before renting to a new tenant. So ask straight out when viewing a property if there are any problems with damp.

If damp or any other health hazard arise in a property where you're a tenant you are entitled to vacate without giving notice and have your deposit refunded immediately.
addie is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet