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06-08-2011, 17:59   #1
cubix
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How to cut laminated wood

The likes of what you would see in wardrobes, is it a certain type of blade for a chop saw or do you simply put your masking tape on. As I seem to be getting a lot of chipped edges which makes it look like a dogs dinner.
Is some laminated wood better than others for not chipping??

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06-08-2011, 20:51   #2
 
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cutting panels like that need to be cut on a panel saw with a scoring blade which runs in the opposite direction of the main blade but perfectly aligned so that when the main blade cuts through it doesnt chip. i have seen a lad pulling his circ saw backwards on a guide first set at say 2mm then dropping it and cutting it the normal way. it works but takes a lot of time.

the name of the sheets are melamine faced. laminated wood is made up of layers or strips of timber glued together
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06-08-2011, 20:53   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cubix View Post
The likes of what you would see in wardrobes, is it a certain type of blade for a chop saw or do you simply put your masking tape on. As I seem to be getting a lot of chipped edges which makes it look like a dogs dinner.
Is some laminated wood better than others for not chipping??

Thanks
The wardrobe material is veneered chipboard or MDF, presumably.
There are a few things you can do to prevent or at least reduce break out.
Most important is to be sure that your saw blade is sharp. An 80 tooth blade on a 250mm chopsaw would be the best.
Make the cut with the face to be seen uppermost - most break out occurs on the underside of the cut.
You could try a false bed on the chopsaw - a piece of MDF would be good for this, and keep a firm downward pressure on the stuff to be cut.
Commercial saws built for cutting sheet materials have a scoring blade; this is designed to minimise break out before the main cutting blade follows to do the principal cut. You can do something similar by scoring the cut line with a sharp knife.
I've never use tape myself, but I can imagine it would help.
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06-08-2011, 20:54   #4
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1 chippy beat me to it
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07-08-2011, 13:50   #5
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Thanks lads
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