Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
12-08-2008, 21:20   #31
reganovich
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 99
So after ten weeks, i should be able to thread water and swim 5 lengths? correct? is this the normal progression?
reganovich is offline  
Advertisement
12-08-2008, 21:26   #32
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3,294
Quote:
Originally Posted by reganovich View Post
So after ten weeks, i should be able to thread water and swim 5 lengths? correct? is this the normal progression?
From my own experience it took me longer than that to swim 5 lengths but I suppose it depends how fit you are and how much practice you put in. I guess everybody is different.
Green Hornet is offline  
13-08-2008, 23:24   #33
ImDave
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,066
I have been swimming on and off for fitness for the last year. I would like to make swimming my main sport, possibly joining an amateur club. I am a member in the local private leisure centre, and also in the 50m pool in University of Limerick. What I am wondering is what gym work can I do to improve my swimming. From watching the olympics, I see they do a lot of back work. Is this where the power comes from? Any advice much appreciated!
ImDave is offline  
15-08-2008, 11:48   #34
Clseeper
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 277
This depends a lot on what part of which stroke you’re looking to improve on. There are a lot of different ideas on what’s best. I’ll admit it not an area I’m an expert in.

I think the main components are the core strength and stability and then focus on some individual areas. If you’re looking at front crawl, I’d focus on triceps, shoulders & forearms. But that would be my weaker points, it depends on your stroke and where you need work. Talk to the gym instructors or do some research on the net for an interesting variety of exercises you can do.

I’d nearly focus on basic overall strength, flexibility [Key] and core work [mainly abs, obliques and back]. Then as you find your faults or weaker areas, work on them.
Clseeper is offline  
18-08-2008, 16:58   #35
ladytri
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 277
[QUOTE SERES
I was just wondering is self training just a bad idea ???, see the problem i have is that i can swim ( not very well-about 30 laps in 20 minutes) but there is room for loads of improvement and the pool near me only does adult beginners lessons and no private courses , i really want to improve because i am doing a sprint triathlon in september and really want to do well
[/QUOTE]

Hi Seres
Couldn't help but notice your post...
I'm a member of the Lough Key Tri club and I'm guessing its our tri you're training for in sept? Anyway even if it isn't-we meet every Wed at 7pm and Sun at 10am for a swim in Lough Key and you're more than welcome to join us to experience swimming in open water.
ladytri is offline  
Advertisement
20-08-2008, 15:48   #36
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 31
Hi, just wondering if anyone has any advice please. I'm not a bad swimmer and would like to get into going more often- 3 times a week maybe, but I'm really unfit and would like to know what kind of training I should be doing to improve my fitness eg combinations of strokes and number of lengths? I'll be going to a 25m pool. Thanks
haze, is offline  
21-08-2008, 16:50   #37
Clseeper
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 277
Haze,

It really depends on what you’re working towards. If it’s just fitness, then you could just focus on front crawl and mid to long distance. There’re some interesting threads at the moment on different sets, you could take a look at them.

Essentially the aim would be to get an initial marker of your current ability and then improve on that. You could try a simple set of 6x50m fc and just record what rough times your doing them on. Then steadily increase the distance and decrease the time as you improve.

For aerobic fitness, aim to increase the distance first then drop the times. From the 50’s, increase to 8x50 then 10x50, then try 4x100m, 6x100m etc. Sets of ~200m would be considered middle distance and anything above 400m would be long distance.

Times: Do a 50m at a steady pace and see what you come in on. Add ~20secs and take this as your first time for the 50’s. For example if your do your first 50m in 1 min, take the 20 sec rest and do the next 5 on 1.20. You’ll get the most rest at the starting ones and then as you get tired and your stroke gets sloppy, your 50m will get slower. This means that as the set progresses you’ll get less and less rest. This is forcing your body to adapt and improve your fitness so next time you’ll do better.

While this is to improve fitness, it should be fun and enjoyable. So make sure to throw in some drills, different strokes and some sprint to keep things different and interesting.
Clseeper is offline  
23-08-2008, 14:23   #38
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 31
Thanks a mil for the advice. At least I have a goal to aim for now!
haze, is offline  
10-09-2008, 13:27   #39
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2
Great to read all the positivity in this thread, and thanks Clseeper for the pointers and advice. I never learned to swim as a kid and only took some lessons over ten years ago and they were really poor and didn't help. Every time I go on holidays with my kids, the eldest of whom swims well, I keep promising myself that I'll have learned by the next time we go on holidays. But I never do. I have no problem being in the pool and can usually flail across it with my head down, legs a-kicking and mostly arms pulling me to the other side. But I end up having to keep my head down so it's a case of getting as far over as one breath'll carry me. Hardly the best of techniques. Anyway, this time I've made up my mind that I'm starting lessons. I just don't know where. Living in Dublin (Knocklyon) gives me a fair range of choices but I wondered if anyone had any particular recommendations for the best adult classes. As I said above, my earlier experience was crap and I don't want to waste time or money on substandard lessons. Also, how much practice should I try and put in between lessons – and is it essential? I only ask because it's not always easy to find the time and if I bring the three kids along, my time is usually spent with them. All suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!
CiaranDowney is offline  
Advertisement
11-09-2008, 10:38   #40
Clseeper
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 277
It’s a personal hate of mine, people teaching swimming who haven’t a clue. These are normally the fitness instructors who have never swam, and can just about do it themselves, but have it as a qualification because it was being done on their course and it is easier to get a job with it.

I have no real experiences with pools or teachers in that area so can’t help, sorry. You could try and get a pool which has a swimming club in it. That way there is more chance that the teachers have swam and come up through the club. The older, well established pool as opposed to the Westwood, Jackie Scelly’s etc.

From what you describe, you have water confidence and aren’t really starting from scratch so it’s mainly stroke correction and breathing you need to work on. Is extra practice essential, no, but it’ll depend on how well you take instruction [and how good the instruction is] and how you adapt it. Obviously the more practice you do, the better.
Clseeper is offline  
10-12-2008, 15:54   #41
Notch000
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,392
Hi im a pretty decent swimmer, i could always swim a lenght or so , but about 2 year ago i took lessons and a little self teaching myself to go propper, i can now do around 30-50 a session, mabye more. I've done 100+ plenty of times before, but my issue is i've never got past the medioaker stage, i can swim set of 6-10 but no more,
I did nt swim for 6 months there and after joining a new gym im nearly back to sq 1.
I have been working on my technique, body position and roll etc but i dont think im ever going to be as smooth as the 'good' swimmer i share lanes with.
Im pretty lazy generally but do push myself in the pool. Im struggeling with my tempo and steady breathing rather than fittness, I think this is holding me back.........where do i go from here ??????

Question 2, if im swimming one night and knackered the next, I usually tell myself there no need to go swimming again as this will do more harm than good, is this true or just pussy talk ??????? I dont want to get injured like i've done before running, I try go 3 times a week usually mainly during the week.
Notch000 is offline  
10-12-2008, 18:39   #42
Killgore Trout
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 671
Three sessions a week is good. If you're feeling wrecked the next day it may not be a great idea to train some more - it is possible to get injuries.

Any clubs around? Even if you got one club session and trained on your own for the other two it should help you build your stamina.

I take it you're talking about a 25m pool?

What kind of time you spending on your sessions? How are they structured? Do you swim against the clock? How long are you resting between sets? etc...

Some people recommend books like Total Immersion to improve technique - I have read it myself and have found parts of it useful (though I wouldn't classify myself as a TI zealot)
Killgore Trout is offline  
11-12-2008, 08:15   #43
Notch000
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,392
I dont time my set, i usually do set of around 6-10 and take a breather in between, usually spending around 30-40 mins in the pool. I'l have to look up this total immersion book
Notch000 is offline  
07-01-2009, 17:19   #44
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 37
adult class

This is really a cool post.

I am actually looking for adult lessons in Dublin and looking to start them asap? Any one know any good teachers in Dublin for a 1-2-1 Adult lesson.
cheerireland is offline  
30-03-2009, 23:53   #45
Fluffybums
Registered User
 
Fluffybums's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Hornet View Post
I learned to swim about 6 months ago and I understand that 20 lengths of the pool may not seem much (as in your earlier post) but I only managed my first length in January and now do 24-28 lengths of a 25 metre pool 2-3 times a week (40 minute sessions). Finding it difficult to extend that though. I'm 39. Will the fact that I learned so late mean that I'm about my limit or do you think I will be able to add a few more if I keep at it?
Definately keep at it. I used to belong to a Life Saving club where one of the members, in her late 50s to early 60s at the time, had learnt to swim about 5 years before I got to know her. When I knew her she had just passed her Lifesaving Award of Merit and was working toward her Distinction, the highest award the RLSS gave at the time. So you are never too old!
Fluffybums is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet