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07-11-2019, 14:05   #16
beauf
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stuffy a rated houses? what do you mean?
He might mean stuffy people in A rated houses
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07-11-2019, 14:07   #17
gwakamoley
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stuffy a rated houses? what do you mean?
I find them almost too warm and the air can feel dead and stuffy. Maybe that's just me but that's my experience anyway.
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07-11-2019, 14:11   #18
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stuffy a rated houses? what do you mean?
I find the great thing about A rated houses is that they come equiped with open/close windows and doors as well as vents... they don't have to be stuffy if you don't want them to be...
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07-11-2019, 14:19   #19
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I find them almost too warm and the air can feel dead and stuffy. Maybe that's just me but that's my experience anyway.
I've had this before, A rated houses that are almost claustrophobic they're so stuffy.

Went to a cousins house at Christmas last year and the weather was mild anyway. No heating on or anything but the house was roasting. Tried opening the vents that were part of the windows but some of the older people then were complaing about drafts. Could not win.

My own parents got their 1990's extension redone last year and its gone from being the coldest part of the house to by far the warmest. They have the vents open most of the year just to let a bit of cooler air in.

Not to say an energy efficient house is a bad thing, but they can nearly be too effective at times.
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07-11-2019, 14:52   #20
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I find them almost too warm and the air can feel dead and stuffy. Maybe that's just me but that's my experience anyway.
yeah better have gaps around the windows let the fresh air in

anyway they must not have had MVHR, and A rate houses i have been in without that still arent stuffy as long as the people in it understand ventilation (which is a common issue regardless of rating of house)
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07-11-2019, 14:56   #21
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Not to say an energy efficient house is a bad thing, but they can nearly be too effective at times.
A few of friends with A rated new builds also complain about being too warm.
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07-11-2019, 14:57   #22
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I've had this before, A rated houses that are almost claustrophobic they're so stuffy.

Went to a cousins house at Christmas last year and the weather was mild anyway. No heating on or anything but the house was roasting. Tried opening the vents that were part of the windows but some of the older people then were complaing about drafts. Could not win.

My own parents got their 1990's extension redone last year and its gone from being the coldest part of the house to by far the warmest. They have the vents open most of the year just to let a bit of cooler air in.

Not to say an energy efficient house is a bad thing, but they can nearly be too effective at times.
So... A rated houses are bad because theres a possible controlable draught when you open a window, but old houses are better because they have consistent draughts?
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07-11-2019, 15:02   #23
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So... A rated houses are bad because theres a possible controlable draught when you open a window, but old houses are better because they have consistent draughts?
Not what I said at all. Where did I say that A rated houses are bad? I said that I have experiences stuffiness in them, agreeing with another poster.

If you read the conversation, people are simply saying that getting an old house up to A is not always necessary. That getting up to a good B or something is quite achievable and perfectly comfortable for most.

There are more than 2 options available, its not a choice of A or F ratings only.
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07-11-2019, 15:14   #24
gwakamoley
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Not what I said at all. Where did I say that A rated houses are bad? I said that I have experiences stuffiness in them, agreeing with another poster.

If you read the conversation, people are simply saying that getting an old house up to A is not always necessary. That getting up to a good B or something is quite achievable and perfectly comfortable for most.

There are more than 2 options available, its not a choice of A or F ratings only.
This was my point. That a poor rating on an old house does not tell the whole story because the assessment system is fairly flawed and could be perfectly comfortable for many people.
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07-11-2019, 15:23   #25
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This was my point. That a poor rating on an old house does not tell the whole story because the assessment system is fairly flawed and could be perfectly comfortable for many people.
i think we can agree the rating system is flawed, but we can also agree that new build a rated houses are built to the best available standard regardless of how some arbitrary steps can get you from and E to a D rating or whatever.

also the comfort of the house is one thing, the cost to heat it is the other.
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07-11-2019, 15:31   #26
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i think we can agree the rating system is flawed, but we can also agree that new build a rated houses are built to the best available standard regardless of how some arbitrary steps can get you from and E to a D rating or whatever.

also the comfort of the house is one thing, the cost to heat it is the other.
Absolutely, the heat retention of new houses is incredible and I don't dispute that for a second. But sometimes we don't or can't get the best available standard for reasons of affordability or preferred area or whatever else, but that doesn't mean that the alternative has to be all doom and gloom.
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07-11-2019, 15:45   #27
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i think we can agree the rating system is flawed, but we can also agree that new build a rated houses are built to the best available standard regardless of how some arbitrary steps can get you from and E to a D rating or whatever.

also the comfort of the house is one thing, the cost to heat it is the other.
Foolish assumption. They're most likely to be built to the lowest possible price that can achieve compliance.
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07-11-2019, 15:48   #28
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Foolish assumption. They're most likely to be built to the lowest possible price that can achieve compliance.
in general terms that will be a higher standard than what was built before it.

and i know how my a rated house is built, its to an excellent standard.
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08-11-2019, 10:31   #29
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in general terms that will be a higher standard than what was built before it.

and i know how my a rated house is built, its to an excellent standard.
I wouldnt have any concerns about housed built from 2014 onwards re build quality, its probably the 20 year period before that that would give me issues on that score.

The issue for me is that 90% of new builds just arent to my personal taste and the density requirements in my preferred area mean that they're all going to be relatively close together, so things that were important to us, like being detached, having side access and a big back garden were unlikely in a new build.

My OH likes to be able to play music loudly which would not be great in a 3 story terrace. He also has a lot of bikes, so the hosue we bought enables us to have a massive shed at the back of the garden, but still plenty of space. He has side access to bring them in any out (they went through the house in our last place which drove me spare because the walls were in bits)

All of these factors were more important to us that an energy rating.

On the subject of the of the value of the BER.... I've not found our new house that bad, although granted its not been extremely cold yet.

We're getting some work done in the coming weeks to insulate the attic which should help. The windows are double glazed (although some of it older double glazing) I really don't think its going to be that bad.

Long term plan is to rip the place apart in 5+ years so we'll manage with warm jumpers until then
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08-11-2019, 10:36   #30
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in general terms that will be a higher standard than what was built before it.

and i know how my a rated house is built, its to an excellent standard.
Its usually dependent on the builder you use.
A bad builder will be consistently bad, likewise a good one will be consistently good.

The only way to know good anything is, is by measuring and testing it.
Air tightness and low heating costs can be calculated.

No one seems to checking if anything built to standard.

https://passivehouseplus.ie/news/gov...ontrol-failure
https://selfbuild.ie/news/majority-g...ors-high-risk/

Considering we've had a range of building scandals around schools and fire safety in apartments.
You'd need to be a brave man to make positive assumptions about the standards of new builds or indeed any building in Ireland.

If you were hands on checking yourself, and then tested everything afterwards, and monitored the costs. Only then you could be sure.

Last edited by beauf; 08-11-2019 at 10:59.
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