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07-09-2019, 09:08   #1
Hedgecutter
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 Attention deficit disorder ADD Medication

My sons was diginosed with ADD this week. It has taken four years to go through the system to, put a name on what we have seen since he was 4/5.

He is on the mild side of the spectrum but the child physiologist suggested medication called Methylphenidate (Ritalin).

We are very slow to go down this road but we would still like to inform our selves about using medications.

Has anyone experienced the effect this drug has for ADD.

We'll talk to our GP and do our own research but first hand experience is valuable.
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07-09-2019, 10:17   #2
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20-09-2019, 14:14   #3
boarduser01
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A little bit late to reply, but I was in your position a few years ago, very nervous about trying any medications for my son, but I can honestly say that it has done nothing but help him. We have tried different formulations since, but have always returned to the one he started on as it works brilliantly with no unwanted side effects. However the same medication in slow acting and slow release froms had nasty side effects. So it is very much a try it and see if it helps situation.

For our son it helped hugely at school with increasing concentration and ability to participate in school. At home it makes him a little easier to join in family activities without talking non-stop!

I felt pressured at the time to put my son on the medication or we would get no other help, but actually it made a huge difference and I am so glad we did try it now. Life for my son has been so much better for it.
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20-09-2019, 14:25   #4
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A little bit late to reply, but I was in your position a few years ago, very nervous about trying any medications for my son, but I can honestly say that it has done nothing but help him. We have tried different formulations since, but have always returned to the one he started on as it works brilliantly with no unwanted side effects. However the same medication in slow acting and slow release froms had nasty side effects. So it is very much a try it and see if it helps situation.

For our son it helped hugely at school with increasing concentration and ability to participate in school. At home it makes him a little easier to join in family activities without talking non-stop!

I felt pressured at the time to put my son on the medication or we would get no other help, but actually it made a huge difference and I am so glad we did try it now. Life for my son has been so much better for it.
Thank you so much for your reply. The biggest worry I have is with his diet, some side effects can be a reduction with his appetite, he is slight enough, but this is something we can monitor.

The Doctor told us we can use it only on weekdays and not weekend if we want. Our GP has said that it has proven results but on a case by case basis. Works for some but not others.

Did u tell the school?
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26-10-2019, 12:45   #5
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I have taken Ritalin for late diagnosis of Aspergers and other forms. It caused more problems for me than it solved with me grinding my teeth. I came off the medication and went down the Traditional Chinese Medicine route. I have had great success. I still get withdrawal symptoms from Ritalin.
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30-10-2019, 16:57   #6
Samuel T. Cogley
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On Ritalin as an adult. I can tell you first hand an undiagnosed / untreated ADD/ADHD is no joke. It, along with other medication has been an absolute Godsend. My advice for what it's worth is trust your doctors but monitor the situation closely with them.
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30-10-2019, 17:12   #7
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I can't offer much help, other than to say I share your concerns.

My son has ADHD and Dyspraxia and in the last three months we have been encouraged to start Ritalin, but as of now it remains in the cabinet. He is improving with the other help he gets, so at the moment we are trying to battle through, but at times, every week during difficult moments, I think perhaps we should start him on it. We dont want to make the decision in haste so we are going to reevaluate at the end of next month.

The school has sung the praises of Ritalin, as have CAMHS and we have heard largely good reports, with the occasional bad story.

It is a difficult decision, we have friends who passionately argue both for and against.
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06-11-2019, 15:42   #8
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We started my boy on Ritalin on Friday.

I have been the main one holding fast against starting, I felt that whereas we might gain a better behaved child we would lose his personality. As his behaviour was getting harder/impossible to cope with we started him on the drug.

I must say that I am amazed, obviously its not the best fit for everyone but for our child it seems it is. We collected him from school on monday, and sat down in a cafe and had the most emotional time ever. We had a conversation that was amazing, he was focused, said what he wanted to say, listened and it was so enjoyable, this was in a busy environment, and he was not distracted at all. I can only liken it to one of those documentaries where someone comes out of a coma and is themselves.

Its really early days, but we are impressed and so is my boy, he said its the best thing that has happened to him. Its still him, but he is happier, and better behaved/more focused.
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08-11-2019, 19:05   #9
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Just to say, from my viewpoint as a nurse, all medication come with side effects and they don't all prove as effective in different people, even if they appear to be exhibiting very similar symptoms or share a diagnosis.

It's vital, when any medicine is taken, to be aware of the common and non-common effects of the medication as well as any interactions it might have with others or areas of the takers lifestyle.
While, ideally, the prescribing doctor should be doing this it is sometimes the case that it is a consultant in isolation from the rest of the person's clinical file that is making a call.
It's no harm asking your trusted GPs opinion also.
And always report something of concern, don't wait.
A medication is seldom the only one available, so there may be more suitable option, but only raising the concern will see the needed changes made.

Lastly, always expect a clinical decision explained in terms you can understand, and don't be fobbed off.
If you or a loved one is expected to take something that important you should expect to be informed as to the positives and negatives, as well as a review period.
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09-11-2019, 00:58   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CiDeRmAn View Post
It's no harm asking your trusted GPs opinion also.
And always report something of concern, don't wait.
A medication is seldom the only one available, so there may be more suitable option, but only raising the concern will see the needed changes made.

Lastly, always expect a clinical decision explained in terms you can understand, and don't be fobbed off.
A lot of us older auties dont have "trusted GP's", Hence why our lives are in messes. I have had a GP flat out deny I had autism in spite of a €500 Psychologists report on the table. That meeting conluded with me being told to get back on the antidepressants. I dont know what happen but I complained to a psychologist that his report wasnt accepted. I suspect the psychologist either rang her and tore her a new one or she red the report and realised what screw up there was. The next morning the GP face was liked a smacked arse and she couldnt even spell "aspergers" as a pediatrician. The GP service is a nightmare to talk to. "GP" and "Trusted" should never appear in the one sentence with me.
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09-11-2019, 12:05   #11
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Originally Posted by skooterblue2
A lot of us older auties dont have "trusted GP's", Hence why our lives are in messes. I have had a GP flat out deny I had autism in spite of a €500 Psychologists report on the table. That meeting conluded with me being told to get back on the antidepressants. I dont know what happen but I complained to a psychologist that his report wasnt accepted. I suspect the psychologist either rang her and tore her a new one or she red the report and realised what screw up there was. The next morning the GP face was liked a smacked arse and she couldnt even spell "aspergers" as a pediatrician. The GP service is a nightmare to talk to. "GP" and "Trusted" should never appear in the one sentence with me.

I'd imagine there are poor gp's out there regarding autism diagnosis, but I have to say my own has been really good, recommending an autism outreach service for further support, I also think he was right in prescriping me anti-depressants. I'd imagine there are limitations with his knowledge of the disorder, but at least he fully accepted my diagnosis, it must be very upsetting not to have that kind of support
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09-11-2019, 12:51   #12
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I'd imagine there are poor gp's out there regarding autism diagnosis, but I have to say my own has been really good, recommending an autism outreach service for further support, I also think he was right in prescriping me anti-depressants. I'd imagine there are limitations with his knowledge of the disorder, but at least he fully accepted my diagnosis, it must be very upsetting not to have that kind of support
Antidepressant when you work it out after a while dont work for autism, if anything they trap you further in your condition. Also they are designed for you not to come off them. See withdrawl effects of Effexor and Cipramil. Scary sugar. I also definitely DO NOT recommend you go cold turkey either. Between the Medical and Social Welfare systems, they trap you into being quiet. You have to make massive efforts to break out of the comfort zone of regular welfare, fuel allowance, and pointless courses to keep you busy until early retirement.
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