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26-06-2017, 02:31   #16
Fathom
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Originally Posted by mzungu View Post
Very true, in the attempt to appear as the other gender I can only imagine that the dialogue would comes across as painfully bad!
To what extent do opposite gender authenticity failures explain why male novel authors appeal to male readerships, and female authors to females, and not their gender opposites? For example, male authors may in like manner fail in the suspension of disbelief (Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 1817) with females, and females with males.

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30-06-2017, 21:12   #17
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To what extent do opposite gender authenticity failures explain why male novel authors appeal to male readerships, and female authors to females, and not their gender opposites? For example, male authors may in like manner fail in the suspension of disbelief (Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 1817) with females, and females with males.
I don't think there is anything in males failing to suspend disbelief in books written by female authors. For example, The Handmaid's Tale is up on Number 4 on the Amazon book charts and has no problem capturing the readers imagination. What I do think is happening is that it is taking a while for things to come around after having only male authors and thus male perspectives in novels for centuries. Change is happening, albeit slowly.
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01-07-2017, 01:40   #18
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I don't think there is anything in males failing to suspend disbelief in books written by female authors. For example, The Handmaid's Tale is up on Number 4 on the Amazon book charts and has no problem capturing the readers imagination. What I do think is happening is that it is taking a while for things to come around after having only male authors and thus male perspectives in novels for centuries. Change is happening, albeit slowly.
Times may be changing mzungu to "postgenderism." J.K. Rowling (Joanne) was obviously successful with Harry Potter. She suspected male gender bias in detective novels. Used pen name Robert Galbraith to write her successful crime series.
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