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27-11-2018, 21:44   #1
VirginiaB
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Townland--multiple names--explain?

I have ancestors from the townland of Enniscoffey/Caran in Westmeath. Further, Caran was spelled a number of ways by my ancestors and in records. They seem to have used Caran & versions rather than Enniscoffey.

Can anyone explain why this townland has two completely different names? No enlightenment on townlands.ie which says the Irish name was anglicized Inis Cofaigh. Does anyone know what Caran means or where it came from? Thanks.
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27-11-2018, 22:29   #2
Hermy
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I think this is simply because before a certain time place names hadn't yet been formalised.

As an example here's an extract from a memorial from the Registry of Deeds I transcribed a while ago where the various spellings of townlands are given. My transcription is incomplete not just because the document was hard to read but also because I wasn't able to find other references to the earlier variations of the place names involved.

Quote:
The castle, mansion house, town and lands of Foxhall, otherwise Ratherlough otherwise Rathreagh, Corsebullaghs otherwise
Com_ebullaghs otherwise Commebullaghs or Corabola Rossart, Aughadrussagh otherwise Carrick__amill, Aghaneskeoge otherwise
Anoghanliskoge, Claghamore otherwise Claghamore otherwise Cloghnamore or Cloghamore, Aghnakelly otherwise Aglinakelly otherwise
Aghanakelly, Aghanregby otherwise Aghnemecloge, Aghande__y, Cloghame, Rath, Clondamogh and Carduff, the towns and lands of
Cloghiggin otherwise Cloghen otherwise Oghaneaslau otherwise Aughorslane otherwise Sillinreagh otherwise Skillianreagh otherwise Clygeen
otherwise Cloghger and Smithfield, the town and lands of Aghavanagh otherwise Portmahon otherwise Newport, Aghnasiloge, Newtown,
Carigin otherwise Carrageen, Killeencrobagh otherwise Killen, Kinnard or Killeen and Kinnard Largie otherwise Lurgee otherwise Lurgan,
Tonebegg otherwise Sca__an Slyaun otherwise S___anmogg, Clonferrock, Slyan Sankey, Furze and the rectorial tithes of the parish of
Foxhall otherwise Rathreagh all situate, lying and being in the Barony of Ardagh and County of Longford

Last edited by Hermy; 27-11-2018 at 22:32.
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27-11-2018, 22:36   #3
pinkypinky
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Some info on logaimn

https://www.logainm.ie/en/51661?s=Enniscoffey+or+Caran
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27-11-2018, 22:49   #4
Tombom1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinkypinky View Post
beat me to it,i presume the numbers and abbreviations on the right are sources how do i find these?I usually just type in google and hope for the best to try and find them usually the older names are in latin books.
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27-11-2018, 23:16   #5
VirginiaB
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Thanks for these suggestions. I had looked at logainm.ie but all seem to be versions of Enniscoffey. Does Caran mean anything in Irish? Google Translate says 'pretty'. Any truth to that?
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28-11-2018, 07:42   #6
spurious
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VirginiaB View Post
Thanks for these suggestions. I had looked at logainm.ie but all seem to be versions of Enniscoffey. Does Caran mean anything in Irish? Google Translate says 'pretty'. Any truth to that?
It would depend on how it is pronounced.
It could be from carn meaning a heap or pile.
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28-11-2018, 08:41   #7
enfield
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Caran, caraun, a rocky place.
Caran, carran, rocky land or a shaped like reaping hook.
Caran, carrán, rocky land.
Caran, chairn, a carn or grave monument.
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28-11-2018, 15:17   #8
VirginiaB
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Very helpful--thanks. I have seen it spelled Caraun so maybe that's it. I'll have to check it out to see if it is a rocky place or has a rock of note there. You're all a mine of great info.
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28-11-2018, 15:23   #9
Peregrinus
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Very helpful--thanks. I have seen it spelled Caraun so maybe that's it. I'll have to check it out to see if it is a rocky place or has a rock of note there\.
What townland does not?
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