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10-02-2021, 18:35   #1
jmlad2020
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Why is Donegal Irish looked down upon

Why? For instance I've heard stories of locals on the Aran Islands refusing to converse with Ulster Irish speakers, instead reverting to English. That is incredibly rude? Is it not? Surely the two aren't that different it warrants arsehole Irish speakers to look down upon it.

I didn't realise Irish speakers were so snobby. They'd rather the language die out than encourage speakers. They are killing the language.
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10-02-2021, 19:03   #2
hullaballoo
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There are arseholes everywhere. Some of them speak Irish and live in Galway. I don't think it's correct to paint entire diverse populations as a result of an anecdote about an encounter like this.
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12-02-2021, 15:36   #3
An gal gréine
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I think your conclusion is of the whole blanket variety.
I have visited all three Aran Islands many times and what you have outlined never happened to me.
Generally speaking, and in all Gaeltachtaí, locals can get frustrated with meeting learners who they can't make out what they are trying to say. Yes, they have been known to switch to English for conveniance sake.
What you have to do in such a situation is to reply to them in Irish. They'll see that you are intent and should revert to Irish.
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03-03-2021, 20:01   #4
deirdremf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmlad2020 View Post
Why? For instance I've heard stories of locals on the Aran Islands refusing to converse with Ulster Irish speakers, instead reverting to English. That is incredibly rude? Is it not? Surely the two aren't that different it warrants arsehole Irish speakers to look down upon it.

I didn't realise Irish speakers were so snobby. They'd rather the language die out than encourage speakers. They are killing the language.
There are all sorts of stories around, not all of them are true.


Here's a true one.
I was in a supermarket in Dingle a few years back, and at the checkout the cashier replied to me in English, although her reply showed that she had understood me. I continued in Irish, she replied again in English. Somewhat frustrated, I eventually asked her if she didn't speak Irish, and she replied, "Oh yes, I'm studying Law with Irish in UCC".


Down the road in the tourist office, something similar happened. Even worse in one of the pubs.


Needless to say, I have avoided the village of Dingle ever since. A lot of thoroughly objectionable people seem to live there.
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