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11-04-2012, 13:22   #31
 
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Meadaracht
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11-04-2012, 17:38   #32
An gal gréine
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Munster seems to have a monopoly on beautiful placenames.
I love INSE GEIMHLEACH (Inchigeelagh) in the county Cork
or what about SEANGHUALAINN (Shanagolden) in Co. Limerick.
Then there's Con Houlihan's favourite place on earth,
CNOC NA gCAISEAL or Knocknagashel in Co. Kerry.
I'll just throw in one more, this time from Co. Donegal, RANN NA MÓNADH.
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11-04-2012, 17:53   #33
_LilyRose_
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lofa le hairgead/airgead le dó (filthy rich/money to burn)
teolaí (snug, cosy)
go borb (abruptly)
samhlaíocht (imagination)
blásta (tasty)
sheiftiúil (scheming, but I like to say shifty)

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11-04-2012, 20:17   #34
Worztron
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Originally Posted by An gal gréine View Post
I'll just throw in one more, this time from Co. Donegal, RANN NA MÓNADH.
What is the English word for Rann Na Mónadh?
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11-04-2012, 20:22   #35
Insect Overlord
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What is the English word for Rann Na Mónadh?
A quick Google search gives "Ranamona". I think it roughly translates as "bog-land quarter".
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11-04-2012, 20:27   #36
Worztron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insect Overlord View Post
A quick Google search gives "Ranamona". I think it roughly translates as "bog-land quarter".
I was not certain as 1 search result says "Rann Na Mónadh, Ranamona, Annagry, Co. Donegal" - so it effectively says the name twice.

Cheers.
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11-04-2012, 20:35   #37
clappyhappy
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Sean nos
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11-04-2012, 20:42   #38
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Áfach. The 10 year old in me giggles every time.
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11-04-2012, 20:59   #39
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Grian. It means sun. I love póigín gréine. It means freckles but directly translated it means kisses of the sun. It sounds beautiful.
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12-04-2012, 00:16   #40
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Grian. It means sun. I love póigín gréine. It means freckles but directly translated it means kisses of the sun. It sounds beautiful.
Póigín gréine- is breá liom é
One word I've loved the sound of since forever is Úr (fresh)
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12-04-2012, 00:19   #41
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Áfach. The 10 year old in me giggles every time.
Never thought of it in my head that way before
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12-04-2012, 06:54   #42
 
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...not forgetting sue-i-nish
Yea, everything sounds lovely in Donegal Irish. I didn't realise it had a soft s though; that's extra lovely.

I also like "luachra". Means "rushes." Like "luachra timpeall na habhann."
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12-04-2012, 19:42   #43
An gal gréine
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What is the English word for Rann Na Mónadh?
Scottish group Capercaille have a track (its on utube) 'Rannamona' about the same area.
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16-01-2021, 14:00   #44
Worztron
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Originally Posted by donalh087 View Post
Féileacán na hoiche

(moth)

or

Deora De

(Fuschia or literally, tears of God)
Hi donalh087. Isn't 'moth' = 'leamhan'?
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16-01-2021, 15:56   #45
Insect Overlord
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Hi donalh087. Isn't 'moth' = 'leamhan'?
Considering that he posted this 9 years ago, you may be waiting a while for him to reply!

That said, both terms are used for moth.

https://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/moth
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