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14-08-2013, 09:34   #1
bobbyss
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Reasons for lesser known Dublin street names

The more well known streets/parks/squares in Dublin are named after famous people. I am more interested in the lesser known ones.

For example, I think there is a Mabel Street, Robert Street and Elizabeth Street around Croke Park.

Who names small streets such as these ?

If it was D C Council/Corporation, does anybody know if there would be evidence, (minutes of meetings anywhere to inform the public of the reasons for such naming and who voted for same)

The only thing that I can come up with is that perhaps there was a well known person in the locality after whom these particular streets were named.

But what I am especially interested in is if anybody knows where there is written evidence of decisions made to name less well known streets.

Many thanks.
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14-08-2013, 09:57   #2
P. Breathnach
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In the case you instance, I suspect that whoever first built those streets had children named Mabel, Robert, and Elizabeth.

Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda, gave his name to four streets in the city centre. Drogheda Street later became Sackville Street, and then O'Connell Street. The other three street still carry his names.
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14-08-2013, 23:19   #3
camphor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyss View Post
The more well known streets/parks/squares in Dublin are named after famous people. I am more interested in the lesser known ones.

For example, I think there is a Mabel Street, Robert Street and Elizabeth Street around Croke Park.

Who names small streets such as these ?

If it was D C Council/Corporation, does anybody know if there would be evidence, (minutes of meetings anywhere to inform the public of the reasons for such naming and who voted for same)

The only thing that I can come up with is that perhaps there was a well known person in the locality after whom these particular streets were named.

But what I am especially interested in is if anybody knows where there is written evidence of decisions made to name less well known streets.

Many thanks.
No street is known at all until it is named. The original developers named the street when preparing the deeds of sale. Many were called after family members of the developer.
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14-08-2013, 23:50   #4
P. Breathnach
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...Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda, gave his name to four streets in the city centre. Drogheda Street later became Sackville Street, and then O'Connell Street. The other three street still carry his names.
Following up on this: Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda had, in addition to four streets based on his name and title, but even had the "of" attached to a thoroughfare. The lane now known as Henry Place was formerly known as "Of Lane".
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15-08-2013, 14:07   #5
bobbyss
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No street is known at all until it is named. The original developers named the street when preparing the deeds of sale. Many were called after family members of the developer.
Is this still the case today do you know? Would this mean buyers have no say in the naming of their new estate/street? Wonder what you would have to do to change a street/estate name if most residents were unhappy with it? Do you need anyone's permission?

Wonder how much area has been named by councils and whether council have records of this. I am envisaging a situation whereby an estate or street is named at the whim of someone in a council which is totally out of character with the actual area.
Thanks for your reply.
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15-08-2013, 16:01   #6
camphor
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The developer chooses the name. It is on the contract and title deeds when the purchasers get them. A street name can be changed if 4/7ths of the ratepayers on the street agree. e.g Ballymun Avenue was changed to Glasnevin Avenue about 30 years ago.
A lot of names are ridiculous but the local authorities allow them.
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15-08-2013, 16:37   #7
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Some of the most interesting street names have been replaced. There was one called "Cow Parlour" which was replaced a few years ago with a blander name.

There is a "Protestant Row" off, I think, Camden St. No doubt that will soon be renamed as it is "Un-PC."
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15-08-2013, 17:06   #8
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this gob****e has allot of it figured out , but the ballymun avenue one really backfired really pompous cousin of my fathers got a roasting when she claimed to live on Glasnevin Avenue , from her own sister
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15-08-2013, 21:06   #9
 
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Some of the most interesting street names have been replaced. There was one called "Cow Parlour" which was replaced a few years ago with a blander name.

There is a "Protestant Row" off, I think, Camden St. No doubt that will soon be renamed as it is "Un-PC."
In Cork Faulkiner's Lane got renamed to Opera Lane, despite not adjoining or being in the vicinity of the Opera House at all, a whim of a developer to make the new designer outlets 'sexier' no doubt.
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