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04-11-2018, 19:52   #1
Skill Magill!
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What's changes to the world / society have you encountered in your life?

Being only 27 I haven't encountered much at all.

I've witnessed:

Peace on the island of Ireland (1999, GFA).
9/11 and war and unrest in the Middle East and Asia.
Introduction of the Euro and abolition of the Punt.
Enlargement of the EU.
The state visit of the monarch of England (IMO a huge and symbolic event).

and that's all of significance really.

How old are you and what have you witnessed in your life?
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04-11-2018, 19:54   #2
 
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I'm approaching 75 and have I've seen more than I should have.

This is the Olwans Forum!!!!
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04-11-2018, 19:57   #3
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I'm approaching 75 and have I've seen more than I should have.

This is the Olwans Forum!!!!
Ah I know. It's why I asked it here.

Most posters here will have seen much more than I.
My dear late grandmother who passed in 2007 was born in 1922, she always had great stories of her youth, the war, rations, hardship etc.

My uncle (a German man) said that we are the first generation of Europeans who hasn't experienced war in several hundred years.
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04-11-2018, 20:01   #4
 
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The standout ones for me, other than the list the OP has already mentioned were probably same-sex marriage being introduced. I know it was a relatively minor tweak to civil partnership, but there was something rather profound in how that day felt.
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04-11-2018, 20:03   #5
 
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My uncle (a German man) said that we are the first generation of Europeans who hasn't experienced war in several hundred years.
Not all of Europe was entirely war free: Bosnia and the rest of Former Yugoslavia spring to mind. I remember visiting Dubrovnik and Montenegro and really feeling quite stunned by the fact that a war had literally been fought there not that many years ago and there were still people wandering around with war injuries, especially in Montenegro - amputees and so on. I had some rather eyeopening chats that were more like something from 1930s/40s Europe than modern times.
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04-11-2018, 20:05   #6
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Not all of Europe was entirely war free: Bosnia and the rest of Former Yugoslavia spring to mind. I remember visiting Dubrovnik and Montenegro and really feeling quite stunned by the fact that a war had literally been fought there not that many years ago and there were still people wandering around with war injuries, especially in Montenegro - amputees and so on.
Of course ! Maybe I should have elaborated, the EU / EEA then.
Croatia is in the EU now though and they might have had spillover of trouble.
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04-11-2018, 20:06   #7
 
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Of course ! Maybe I should have elaborated, the EU / EEA then.
Croatia is in the EU now though and they might have had spillover of trouble.
They and fairly direct action. Dubrovnik was shelled.
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04-11-2018, 20:49   #8
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Communications. As a child our only contact with the outside world - apart from going out and actually experiencing it - was a radio and newspapers, and only a Sunday newspaper was bought in our house. I think I was about 12 or 14 before we got a phone, but it was used sparingly, with permission, and not before 6pm.

Then in my early 20s I went abroad and my only contact with home was a 5 days each way letter. In the 5 years I was away there were two phone calls to me and one from me home. The one from me required considerable organisation - I had to book the call at the local school (where my husband was working - and wait 8 hours while it was booked and routed through I think Kinsasha to up country Kenya.

Then we came back to Ireland in 1973 and applied for a house phone. After three years the government said that everyone on the waiting list would have a phone within 12 months, and we did, so we had waited 4 years to get a phone. Still an expensive business and calls were kept short and in the evenings where possible.

Then I learned to use a computer in about 1997 when I went to college as an adult student, then the internet and emails - I seem to remember I sent my first email in about 2006, would that be right? The first one from my own computer in my own office anyway. My first mobile phone - a Nokia which lasted me about 10 years - one of those orange coloured ones. And only about 2 or 3 years ago a smart phone. And now we communicate the whole time with phones and laptops and tablets and skype and whatsapp (except I have taken exception to them because they want even more info from me) and talking to people all over the world any time you feel like it.
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04-11-2018, 22:53   #9
 
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I certainly don't remember the 1970s but even from the 1990s onwards there's been an absolutely huge sea change in communication.

I mean, even going back to the early 2000s we were struggling with WAP on mobiles and astronomically expensive mobile data and now we just take it for granted that we've a pretty powerful computer with a broadband connection in our pockets. The speeds that my mobile phone gets on 4G are significantly higher than what Telecom Eireann would have used to connect a medium sized town 25 years ago.

We were going through some old stuff in boxes at home and one of my younger relatives found a CallCard and actually didn't 'get' why you would ever want a card that was used for operating a payphone. It just made no sense to him as a concept. It was just 'old time stuff'. It's not all that long ago it was the height of modern telecommunications technology.

Even go back a few years ago and most Irish people did not have a credit card or a visa / MasterCard debit card. A lot of us just had a Laser card which was utterly useless online and didn't work very well outside Ireland. I can't imagine life without Visa and Visa Debit now. I get irritated if I can't pay for things with my watch!

Last edited by EdgeCase; 04-11-2018 at 22:58.
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05-11-2018, 00:24   #10
 
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The best changes are medical improvements:

When I was very young in the 50's many of our neighbours had large families, 8, 10, 15, 17 children. Women were worn out long before they were 40. By the time I was getting married in the 70's women had more choice regarding family planning as the contraceptive pill was available.

In 1954 - first human kidney transplant
In 1967 - first human heart transplant.
In 1963 - first human liver transplant
In 1963 - first human lung transplant

And lots more besides i.e. vaccines etc.
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05-11-2018, 00:51   #11
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2018 - Skill Magill! got banned as a troll....
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05-11-2018, 10:12   #12
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Well granted it was a bit of a gift of a question to the O&Os, looking for the 'I remember when' answers, it is quite interesting, to some of us at any rate.

We (in family conversations) have discussed before whether my granny - 1890(ish) to 1972; my mother - 1921 - 2014; or my sister and myself - 1940s to date had seen the most change in society in their lifetimes. Its hard to say. Gran saw staggering changes in the role of women, transportation and living and health standards. After that it was development of those themes until computers came along. Computers didn't really impinge on my mother's life, where they have on mine and my sister's. And if for some reason computers and internet were to fail we would be plunged back a lot further than the 20th century, so dependent are we on them.

Prior to the first world war the biggest changes were in transport, and most people living in a small town or village would not really have seen any appreciable difference in their lifestyle, during their lifetime, to that of their parents.

Last edited by looksee; 05-11-2018 at 20:21.
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05-11-2018, 20:19   #13
 
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2018 - Skill Magill! got banned as a troll....

Surely not for the OP? Anyway, its an interesting subject for us elder lemons.
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05-11-2018, 20:20   #14
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Surely not for the OP? Anyway, its an interesting subject for us elder lemons.
More to do with being a rereg I think.
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05-11-2018, 20:49   #15
 
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More to do with being a rereg I think.
Hence my initial glib reply. He never hides his identity very well.


I don't think there's any aspect of everyday life that I haven't seen changed since the 40s. I think even the attitudes and values of the average person have changed immensely.

Transport, communications, medicine, science, broadcasting, politics and religion have changed beyond anything we could have imagined 70 years ago.
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