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10-06-2004, 13:56   #31
Marq
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www.perseus.tufts.edu - Fantastic resource of classical texts, secondary texts, articles maps and features of general historical interest
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10-06-2004, 13:58   #32
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oh and forget suetonius and plutarch if you want to read about the early empire. Just read the genius that is the Annals of Tacitus. History as dense anti-establishment propaganda, and literary flair
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05-07-2004, 12:32   #33
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To change the subject slightly, just read Orlando Figgis' "Natasha's Dance".

It's a cultural history of Russia from the establishment of the Muscovite kingdoms to the fall of the Soviet regime.

Superb.
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18-09-2004, 23:16   #34
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Catch-22 by Joseph Heller is one of the best books you'll read. It is fiction but Heller did serve in WW2 as a bombadier which the main character (Yossarian)is about. Comical and mad all about Yossarian trying to get out of flying any more missions, also an anti-capitalist concept to it. A tip though don't read the author's introduction, i read it after reading the main book and the fecker goes a good ways in spoiling the end.

The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer. True story about the author who was conscripted to the German Army in WW2 when he was 17 because he had a German mother. Touches all the feelings of war i guess, hate, fear, love, desperation and emptyness on the Eastern front.

Che Guevara-A Revolutionary life by Jon Lee Anderson. A fairly un-baised biography of Guevara, 600 odd pages but it's interesting.

Last edited by Corcaigh; 18-09-2004 at 23:21.
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19-06-2005, 10:45   #35
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.

Is Catch 22 not meant to be dragged out in places? I haven't read it myself but that's what I've heard from some people who have read it.
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08-11-2005, 18:44   #36
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For an excellent one volume general history of the world, try JM Roberts' "history of the World (I think it's now called the Penguin History of the World), I couldn't put it down!

For a more specific history try 'A Basque history of the world', very readable
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01-01-2006, 21:37   #37
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Tom Holland has written two very readable and interesting narrative histories, Rubicon ( Dealing with Sulla, Pompey, Crassus, Caesar and the subversion of the Republic) and Persian Fire (Dealing with the the Persian conquest of their empire and the unprecedented defeat of their invasion by the Greeks). Point of warning, repeated by the author, is that many of the conclusions he draws and context he provides are hotly disputed but he references these, and moves on with the flow which means you can fly through the books. I found Rubicon to be unputtdownable, and Persian Fire is shaping up very nicely as well.

I also picked up Harry Sidebottoms A very short introduction: Ancient Warfare. Small, very readable book that concentrates on the development of warfare in Greece and Rome, comparing them to Eastern and Barbarian foes, as well as the changing role of Generals, from front line inspirations to organisers. He argues that the "Western Way of War" is an idealogy, rather than a historical reality and that there is no continuity in a tradition that ended with the fall of the Roman Republic and wasnt revived until Napoleonic times.
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27-02-2006, 00:48   #38
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You just got there before me Sand.

Rubicon is absolutely brilliant. It is just so exciting from start to finish. There really was some amazing figures in ancient Rome.

Sulla was my absolute favourite. He had the control of the entire republic to himself and he just fixed it up and resigned his post, amazing considering how power hungry they all seemed to be back then.

I recommend it to anyone, you will not be disappointed.

Beevors Stalingrad was pretty good too. I loved that book
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13-03-2006, 22:17   #39
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Can anyone recommend any books that covers the land war? And Land League?
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24-03-2006, 15:19   #40
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Can anyone recommend any books that covers the land war? And Land League?
Has there ever been a book written on this area?
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24-03-2006, 21:44   #41
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"Guerilla days in Ireland" by Tom Barry is an excellent account of the Tan war in Cork.

"On another mans wound" by Ernie O' Malley is also a good read. Abit drawn out in places but readable and interesting none the less.

"Ten dead men" by David Beresford is without a doubt the best book on the 1981 hunget strike, a must read.

"Battle Cry" by Leon Uris is a fictional account of a marine corp platoon during the war in the Pacific, he was a marine during WW2 so he knows what he's on about. Heart wrenching and an excellent read.
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24-03-2006, 21:58   #42
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You just got there before me Sand.

Rubicon is absolutely brilliant. It is just so exciting from start to finish. There really was some amazing figures in ancient Rome.
Ive got to say, Persian Fire was as good as if not better. Holland is a very strong writer, his description of Marathon and the mood of the Athenians as they advanced outnumbered on an enemy widely considered ( and proven up to that point) to be invincable - having already described the slaughter of the Athenian hoplites in Asia Minor by the Persians just shortly before - is fantastic. He turns history from dry quotations and numbers into unmissable reading. Rubicon read like a political thriller, which it was. The way he writes Persian Fire makes it clear why the Greeks (and later Europeans) were so in awe of Marathon, Thermopylae (300 Spartans of semi-legend, who were no libertarians themselves) and Salamis, helped by the fact he illustrates the achievements of the Persians in forging the largest empire the world had ever known at that point.

Im going to have to keep an eye out for his next one as it will be an instant purchase.

Last edited by Sand; 24-03-2006 at 22:55.
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15-05-2006, 10:22   #43
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"Ten dead men" by David Beresford is without a doubt the best book on the 1981 hunget strike, a must read.
Yes excellent, but I think it's actually "Ten men dead" as far as I can remember.
Tim Pat Coogan wrote a book just before the hunger strike called "On the blanket" also well worth a read, I reckon it gets overshadowed by what happened later with regard to the hungerstrikes, it really shows how bad things were in the maze before the hungerstrikes.

One of the most interesting books I've read was "Celt and Saxon" by Peter Berresford Ellis, starts from the fall/decline of Roman Britain and Subsequent invasion by Angles, saxons and Jutes and the gradual push back of the British celts to Wales, Scotland and Cornwall.
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16-05-2006, 15:52   #44
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Yes excellent, but I think it's actually "Ten men dead" as far as I can remember.
Sorry, my bad!

I havne't read "On the Blanket", but anything by Coogan is usually excellent.

Bobby Sands wrote an essay called "one day in my life" ,which coincidently enough is about what a day in the H Blocks was like. This romantic notion of glorious heros defiantly opposing the system are swept aside when you think about waking up every morning crawling with maggots.
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09-08-2006, 19:40   #45
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"The Green Flag: A History of Irish Nationalism" by Robert Kee looks like a good one volume read on modern Irish History. I haven't got to it yet, but it's sitting on my shelf. It's got class reviews though.

At the moment I'm reading "The Year of the French" by Thomas Flanaghan. It's a fascinating look into the French expedition to County Mayo during the 1798 rebellion. It's an historical novel, painstakingingly accurate as far as I can tell, and told from the perspective of generals, yeomen, landlords and peasants etc etc. Very fair treatment in all corners.

It's been mentioned already, but I really recommend "Provos: The History of the IRA and Sinn Fein" by Peter Taylor as a good one volume history of the modern Republican movement. Coming from an English writer I was suprised at how fair and objective his analysis was. It made me reconsider prejudices, both good and bad about modern Republicamism.

For Classical history buffs I would recommend "Alexander Of Macedon 356-323 B.C" by Peter Green. It's a great overview, focusing mainly on the military and politicial aspects though, so don't expect a soap opera treatment of his personal life (*cough* Oliver Stone *cough*).

For the Roman Republic, other than Rubicon I'd suggest Colleen McCullough's Master's of Rome series of historical novels. They start a few years before Marius' Numidian campaign and end with Caesar's death. I've only read the first two "First Man in Rome" and the "Grass Crown" but I'm hooked.

I'm going to place an order for a few books soon myself, thinking of getting the Oxford Companion to Irish History for sure and maybe Coogan's biography of Michael Collins. Does anyone know of a good book dealing with Cromwell in Ireland and the Irish Confederacy?

Last edited by HellOrConnaught; 09-08-2006 at 19:42.
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