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12-06-2011, 18:39   #46
 
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Fingerprints of the Gods by Graham Hancock is a great read.

It uses evidence and powerful arguments to make you consider the possibility that there has been civilisations on earth as advanced or more advanced than we currently are.

well worth checking this out
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02-07-2011, 21:18   #47
Biker3
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The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell
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23-07-2011, 00:14   #48
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These were definitely life altering and, in some cases, mind blowing books for me:

1) The Alchemist - Paolo Coelho
2) The Holographic Universe - Michael Talbot
3) The Divine Matrix - Gregg Braden
4) You can heal your life - Louise L. Hay
5) The Celestine Prophecy - James Redfield (although written in a slightly annoying fictitious style but don't let that put you off!)
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31-07-2011, 09:44   #49
variety
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I read a book last year that blew my mind - one of those that you have no idea what's going on until the very last chapters, and then you just have to read it again immediately once you know what's going on and all the nuances in it are astonishing.

Jasper Fforde: Shades of Grey

I've since read all his books and he's fast becoming one of my favourite authors of all time. Mostly they're light-hearted fiction, and a great thing to fall back on when you've finished reading one of those epic 'enlightenment' and 'soul-bettering' reads that leave you pondering the purpose/value of everything.
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07-08-2011, 16:56   #50
 
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The Age of Absurdity: Why Modern Life Makes It Hard to Be Happy by Michael Foley
Light and profound at the same time.
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10-08-2011, 18:24   #51
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Stephen Hawking- A Brief History of Time. Really good book.

Also anything by Haruki Murakami, strange stuff but really enjoyable. I will definitely read them all again.
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25-08-2011, 20:06   #52
pourquoi
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I adored Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates.
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15-02-2012, 07:48   #53
Whispered
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Tuesdays with Morrie is very uplifting, makes you examine your relationships with those close to you and makes you look at life slightly differently.
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16-02-2012, 14:21   #54
Acheron3
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Quote:
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The Age of Absurdity: Why Modern Life Makes It Hard to Be Happy by Michael Foley
Light and profound at the same time.
+1 to this. Really enjoyed it, much more than a sacastic coffee table book.
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17-02-2012, 22:30   #55
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"Atlas Shrugged" and "The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand. I know she's pushing her philosophy but they're both a damned good read, different to anything else I've read.
I've heard "Atlas Shrugged" mentioned many times on the web and decided to give it a go but really struggling to finish it. When they're not having sex (like something out of Mills & Boon) her characters are giving looong speeches. Determined to finish it to see where its going but not enjoying as much as I was.
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06-03-2012, 18:05   #56
noserider
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A million little pieces James Frey.
Don't let the controveresery around the book distract you from what is a pure page turner. I dare you not to read it!!

Also if you like it, try My Friend Leonard, same author.
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22-03-2012, 15:17   #57
 
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A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby

Then We Came To The End by Joshua Ferris (frikkin' awesomely written)

Catcher In The Rye by J D Salinger
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30-03-2012, 21:42   #58
Borboletinha
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A million little pieces James Frey.
Don't let the controveresery around the book distract you from what is a pure page turner. I dare you not to read it!!

Also if you like it, try My Friend Leonard, same author.

Omg, I hated that book so much still beating myself up for wasting time reading it! And that was before i found out he made up most of the rubish! A million little lies would be a more siutable title

Having root canals without anestesia, yeah right...
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13-06-2012, 13:49   #59
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Everything by Farren Farrell, especially the myth of male power. It really opened my eyes and completely changed the way I see the world
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18-06-2012, 03:19   #60
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Shelley's Frankenstein... reading it my mind was absolutely blown. The book in all honesty couldn't be further from any of the films made of it (Branagh's was closest, but Christ that was tripe). I really longed for there to be a spinoff book from the monster's POV, because I felt there was a segment that desperately needed expanding and gave a whole different dynamic to the book. No spoilers here, go and read it!

Clavell's Shogun. Total page turner, and though it was (loosely) based on historical fact so not all *that* much was a surprise, I found the humanity and emotions portrayed amazingly. Also, his King Rat was also a great hard-to-put-down read, and the ending shows a deep shock of cold as the roles are lost in the bite of release.

Orwell's 1984. Not long finished this myself, and it was on my to-do list for a long time. I found most of it underwhelming at best, but jeez, the anger/pity it brought out in me to read the last few pages.... very powerful stuff. Ended in a way I completely did not see coming... to me I always think that's the highest compliment you can pay a writer!
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