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30-07-2020, 21:34   #1
Jonathan1990
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Newry In 1850s

Just posting this in After Hours as I can't find an appropriate regional forum for the place mentioned above.

I am in UK but I had always heard a rumor about having relatives from Ireland. Seems like I found my answer tonight. They came from somewhere called Newry in County Armagh around 1850s. Wanting to find out Newry's history. It's taken months of researching.
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30-07-2020, 21:40   #2
 
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Try here
https://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/foru...der=desc&page=
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30-07-2020, 21:47   #3
Necro
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I'm going to move your thread to Genealogy, OP. Reminder to read the forum charter.
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30-07-2020, 21:50   #4
pinkypinky
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Lewis' topographical review of Ireland would be a good place to start. It was published in 1837.

http://www.askaboutireland.ie/readin...graphical-dic/

The censuses from the 19th century don't survive unfortunately.

Have a read of our main sticky on tracing your ancestors as well.
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30-07-2020, 22:16   #5
mod9maple
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Newry is divided in two by a river which acts as the county border between Down and Armagh. I'm from a village just outside the town, the South Armagh side. I can recommend local history books, county genealogy books and appropriate records as well as give you advice on surnames, baronies, parish records, townlands etc. You can PM me if you want.
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25-08-2020, 05:25   #6
Hamsterchops
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan1990 View Post
I am in UK but I had always heard a rumor about having relatives from Ireland......
You're in the UK, but did you know that Newry Newrie (Scots Gaelic) is also in the UK....

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File...cation_map.svg

Recently discovered that my maternal Grandmother was from Enniskillen NI, another beautiful town.

Thinking of getting one of those postal ancestry DNA test kits to see where my ancestral roots come from ...
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25-08-2020, 06:29   #7
Peregrinus
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Nitpick: Newrie isn't a Scots Gaelic word. If it's a word used in Scotland at all as a variation of Newry it would be Scots, not Gaelic. Scots is a Saxon language, not a Celtic one - so, related to English, not Irish or Scots Gaelic.

Newry is from (Irish) Gaelic, iúrach, a yew grove.
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25-08-2020, 09:20   #8
Hamsterchops
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I picked it up from Wiki.
Newry, 34 miles from Belfast ...

Scots: Newrie.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newry
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25-08-2020, 09:36   #9
Peregrinus
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Pretty sure that's a reference to Ulster Scots, not to Scots Gaelic. Very different languages.

Both the English and Ulster Scots name of the town are derived from the (Irish) Gaelic name.
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