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17-10-2020, 17:13   #1
pyritebuyer
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Discovering pyrite remediation work was carried out after going sale agreed

We went sale agreed 2 weeks back after the top bidder backed off from the property. Here are the sequence of events:

1. We were not made aware of any pyrite during viewings or while we were going sale agreed.

2. We got the home survey done and we had specifically asked to 'check for asbestos, pyrite or other undesirable materials.' (as suggested by our solicitor). The home survey came out to be good with answer 'None apparent on inspection'.

3. The solicitor received a report of pyrite remediation work carried last year. The report states "removal of hardcore", "placement of new hardcore", "repair of rising walls", etc as work carried out and claims exemption from "non-complaint installation of timber flooring". I have no idea what this means and the report does not state whether it was carried out under "Pyrite Remediation Scheme" by "Pyrite Resolution board" or the construction company was privately hired. No green certificate was provided. I have asked the surveyor for their opinion and have so far not received anything (its been 2 days).

4. The contract from seller's solicitor says "The purchaser is put on notice of remediation for reactive pyrite in the sub-floor hardcore of the subject property and shall conclusively accept and resume that all remedial workers required have been done. and shall accept the certificate of <construction engineer> in Documents Schedule as conclusive evidence thereof. No objection, requisitions or enquiries shall be raised in relation to this matter and any requisitions or enquiries will not be entertained in relation to the same."

I am a bit disappointed to discover pyrite remediation work and feel this should have been bought to my notice before going sale agreed. Otherwise seller has something to hide. We had to let go of other another property we were top bidders on because of this. The remediation report and solicitor verbiage is all a bit too much for me to understand. The house is otherwise in perfect condition and perfect for us. The perfect condition could because remediation was recently carried out and I dont know if the house condition will deteriorate over the years or not.

Suggestions on how to proceed please. Should we just backout? Should I talk to solicitor for advice? Should I try asking surveyor opinion once again? Should I ask if the remediation work was carried out by Pyrite Resolution board? Should we ask for pyrite green certificate? If the seller is not willing to provide it, should we just back out or negotiate on the price?


P.S. - Sorry about the new account. Had to create one to hide my identity and the house's location.
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17-10-2020, 17:23   #2
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Personally I'd waik. Will there be issues with insurance?
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17-10-2020, 17:29   #3
poker--addict
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it is really a question of whether the correction work has been done properly and signed off with everything above board. If that proves hard to ascertain then back out.
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17-10-2020, 17:57   #4
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Personally I'd waik. Will there be issues with insurance?
We got no issues securing insurance on the property. I can try disclosing the pyrite remediation issue to insurer so see if the quote changes.
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17-10-2020, 18:01   #5
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it is really a question of whether the correction work has been done properly and signed off with everything above board. If that proves hard to ascertain then back out.

Thanks. Yes, you got the crux of the issue. It seems like green certificate is the only way to prove it.
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17-10-2020, 18:07   #6
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was it bidx1 property

i would walk away from it the first buyer walked away from it you will need to hire a structural engineer to see if work has been done
they should have had a structural engineer
sign off on it and also there should be photos of the work being carried out
you will find it hard to resell the property
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17-10-2020, 19:13   #7
pyritebuyer
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was it bidx1 property

i would walk away from it the first buyer walked away from it you will need to hire a structural engineer to see if work has been done
they should have had a structural engineer
sign off on it and also there should be photos of the work being carried out
you will find it hard to resell the property
Thanks for your reply. Its not a bidx property, the estate agent is one of the biggest property brokers. The structural engineer has signed off the carried out work in the remediation report but it doesn't state if the issue will come back or not. With the absence of green cert, this is bit risky alright
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17-10-2020, 22:01   #8
theteal
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We got no issues securing insurance on the property. I can try disclosing the pyrite remediation issue to insurer so see if the quote changes.
So the insurer aren't aware of the pyrite? Is it not one of their standard questions like subsidence/underpinning? I'm sure I've read of policies being refused in the past


Being honest, it's just casting doubt on your big purchase and it's something you could do without. There will be other houses with no such issues so why volunteer this one upon yourself. We had to pull out of a sale late in the day when we realised that the 20+ year previous underpinning was still a flag for getting insurance. We asked the sellers to pay for a full structural survey which they declined - if they wouldn't pay the couple hundred for that they really wouldn't be happy when our offer for the house was substantially lowered (past subsidence only revealed after sale agreed)

Last edited by theteal; 17-10-2020 at 22:07.
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18-10-2020, 02:14   #9
pyritebuyer
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So the insurer aren't aware of the pyrite? Is it not one of their standard questions like subsidence/underpinning? I'm sure I've read of policies being refused in the past


Being honest, it's just casting doubt on your big purchase and it's something you could do without. There will be other houses with no such issues so why volunteer this one upon yourself. We had to pull out of a sale late in the day when we realised that the 20+ year previous underpinning was still a flag for getting insurance. We asked the sellers to pay for a full structural survey which they declined - if they wouldn't pay the couple hundred for that they really wouldn't be happy when our offer for the house was substantially lowered (past subsidence only revealed after sale agreed)
Thanks... Just curious, if the seller has paid for full structural survey or had reduced the price to account for full structural survey , would you have gone ahead with the purchase? Or the fact that it had issues would have persued to back off regardless?
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18-10-2020, 11:17   #10
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Thanks... Just curious, if the seller has paid for full structural survey or had reduced the price to account for full structural survey , would you have gone ahead with the purchase? Or the fact that it had issues would have persued to back off regardless?
I suppose had the survey come back all good, we would have gone ahead with it - like I say, it was late stage of the process, we had the contracts signed, just hadn't sent them back yet. Looking back I think that would have been a naive FTB move. I'm very glad we didn't, the house we went sale agreed on a week later was/is so much better, just it was a bit older and needed a bit of work
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18-10-2020, 11:40   #11
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I suppose had the survey come back all good, we would have gone ahead with it - like I say, it was late stage of the process, we had the contracts signed, just hadn't sent them back yet. Looking back I think that would have been a naive FTB move. I'm very glad we didn't, the house we went sale agreed on a week later was/is so much better, just it was a bit older and needed a bit of work

Thanks. I am glad it worked out great for you. I am going to ask for survey and let the insurer know to see what happens.
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