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24-05-2020, 23:24   #16
KKV
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You'll get loads of stuff for free or cheap on donedeal and adverts.

Some of it's sh/te, but some of it is good, too. When my brother bought his first house, he was of the opinion that it's his new house and it was only getting the best of everything. He bought all his electronics from a local shop, and furniture from a different local shop. Everything was financed. He spent a fortune. To his credit though, he never regretted it, and in fairness, it's about 15 years later and most of the stuff is still going strong (washing machine, bed, TV etc. all still grand, for example).

Though he did change the suite of furniture, and TV and a few other bits recently by choice.

Personally, I always hated the idea of adding debt to debt, but it's always an option if your mortgage will be inexpensive to you.

Personally, I reckon you'd need about 10k to get a nice finish inside a house. A grand will get you a decent bed/mattress. About a grand gets you a good sofa. I bought in Power City before and I got a fridge freezer, hob, oven, microwave and extractor fan (all integrated) for 1100 if i recall correctly. Kitchen will presumably be there already in the house for you. You'd get a decent TV for 500 euro.

You can spend a lot, of course, but if you're keeping your budget at the forefront of your mind, you can get away with a small budget if you keep an eye on what you're buying. Your budget will obviously need to go up if you're putting in new kitchen, floors, skirting, doors etc. but those wouldn't be a priority unless the ones already there are really in tatters.
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24-05-2020, 23:28   #17
Creamy Goodness
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Originally Posted by Wildly Boaring View Post
OP got an answer of 10k to 40k above!!
I'm showing the op they can calm down initially.

In the real world we all put up with poor furniture for the first couple of years.
I live in the real world and had a spreadsheet for when I bought my house less than two years which I did reference when giving the estimate.

I ended up somewhere nearer to €20k for flooring a 4 bed, kitchen appliances, blinds, alarm, bed and mattress, sofa and two arm chairs, cutlery, dinnerware, etc.

We did go for expensive flooring but my thought is that if I skimp here I’ll be pulling it up in 10 years and it’ll be a nightmare.

I made do with a hand me down kitchen table, tv and other bits and bobs. Since then I’ve kitted out the living room with a 5.1.2 speaker setup and an OLED tv. Which would add roughly €5k to the initial value. I’ve also given back the kitchen table and bought my own + 6 chairs. I’ve also placed two new beds in the spare rooms, turned the box room into an office and bought lockers/lamps/pictures/throws etc. Bought a lawnmower/garden tools/garden storage since. It all adds up and because the OP didn’t say they wanted to either do it all in one or build as they go or what kind of tastes they have I was more lenient with the estimate.

I told the OP to get the bare minimum I don’t know how unreal world that could be?

Last edited by Creamy Goodness; 24-05-2020 at 23:41.
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24-05-2020, 23:32   #18
ChewBerecca
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I wouldn't recommend skimping on the core pieces. Invest what you can on your mattress and sofa. You'll be spending most of your time on one or the other.

The below was what we spent in the last 7 months or so. But we had some savings and had been buying bits in stages (beds and mattresses can take 8 weeks to be delivered, that's potentially two paydays to recover). We've yet to paint the place because of lockdown but thankfully the house is fairly neutral.

Our bedframe was about 400, mattress we went orthopedic (bad back) and spent well over 1k. Never been more comfortable on a bed in my life.

2 sofas were close to 3k. You can get cheaper but I've back problems so was very selective, most sofas aggravate it.

Dining set around 1k during a Harvey Norman staff event, my parents bought it as a gift.

Coffee table was 300 but we were picky.

Appliances will vary depending on your buy, we had to buy washing machine, fridge, dryer and then we had to replace the dishwasher in the last few months.

Blinds/curtains, if you need them just get cheap alternatives until you can get a sense of your colour schemes or how bright or drafty the rooms are. No point slashing out until you know what colour your walls will be or if you need blackout for light or thicker material for warmth.

The best advice I was given was to take our time. I wanted to go all guns blazing and redo everything immediately. Now we've been here a few months, have the key pieces, we have a better sense of the lighting and heat in each area of the house during winter and summer and what we need to focus our attention on.
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24-05-2020, 23:32   #19
afatbollix
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Heres what we did,

We made a list room by room of what we would need.

Kitchen,
Glasses
cups plates
pots
pans

Bedroom
bed
Duvet

etc etc

Then we went and found what we liked online and broke it up to what we needed ASAP and stuff we could wait on.

Friends and family did help, We got a bed from friends, table and other bits. People are always looking to get rid of stuff which will tide you over until you can afford to get what you want.

If theres one thing I could give myself advice on is save up for the important stuff. Bed and couch, If you are not on one you are on the other.

That way you will only buy it once and that is a saving in the long run.
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24-05-2020, 23:42   #20
James Bond Junior
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I bought a couch on finance from DFS. Handy and I paid it off early when I had a bit of breathing space but ****e quality so be careful.

Don't forget about renting a room too. I did it for the first year but got such a decent tenant who ended up staying 3 years. She would still be there only I moved abroad and rented the house out.
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24-05-2020, 23:52   #21
Maz2016
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I bought a couch on finance from DFS. Handy and I paid it off early when I had a bit of breathing space but ****e quality so be careful.

Don't forget about renting a room too. I did it for the first year but got such a decent tenant who ended up staying 3 years. She would still be there only I moved abroad and rented the house out.
That’s exactly what I’m planning to do. The location is next to a hospital and 15 minutes drive to a university Was thinking if I got a good tenant , paid the mortgage off as quick as possible. I could use the tenants money towards renovations etc
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25-05-2020, 00:10   #22
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Thanks for the advice guys, genuinely delighted with the replies. Has definitely given food for thought
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25-05-2020, 00:13   #23
Dogg Munde
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Top tip: buy the show house if you can!
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25-05-2020, 11:12   #24
Creamy Goodness
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Top tip: buy the show house if you can!
Not sure I'd agree with that, yes you get the house kitted out but you usually pay more for the pleasure, the flooring is usually poor (especially when it comes to laminate flooring they use < 10mm which is usually creaky and more importantly it's not to your own personal taste. Showhouses look great but try and actually live in one and you'll soon find you wish you didn't have to dump so many impractical things. You also have the pleasure of having furniture/floorings that have been trampled on and already have wear and tear from 100's coming in to view, sure they'll clean it but that's only superficial, could be springs destroyed in the bed from little Johnny jumping up and down whilst viewing it with his parents etc.

Guess it really depends what kind of painter are you, do you prefer a blank canvas or do you want paint-by-numbers canvas? Nothing wrong with either approach but if some posters think I'm out of this world for suggesting €40k well the showhouse in my estate went for €50k over the houses of the same type as they sold it with the contents.

Last edited by Creamy Goodness; 25-05-2020 at 11:16.
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25-05-2020, 11:20   #25
Dogg Munde
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Not sure I'd agree with that, yes you get the house kitted out but you usually pay more for the pleasure, the flooring is usually poor (especially when it comes to laminate flooring they use < 10mm which is usually creaky and more importantly it's not to your own personal taste. Showhouses look great but try and actually live in one and you'll soon find you wish you didn't have to dump so many impractical things. You also have the pleasure of having furniture/floorings that have been trampled on and already have wear and tear from 100's coming in to view, sure they'll clean it but that's only superficial, could be springs destroyed in the bed from little Johnny jumping up and down whilst viewing it with his parents etc.

Guess it really depends what kind of painter are you, do you prefer a blank canvas or do you want paint-by-numbers canvas? Nothing wrong with either approach but if some posters think I'm out of this world for suggesting €40k well the showhouse in my estate went for €50k over the houses of the same type as they sold it with the contents.
I live in a former show house. No laminate flooring anywhere. I certainly didn’t pay anything near 50k more than the house next door.
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25-05-2020, 11:35   #26
awec
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Fridge freezer washing machine 1000

Bed and mattress 500

Couch 500

Blinds 500

Flooring 3000

Table and chairs - ours were free - say 500

Edit 500 for oven


After that as much or as little as you want.
You may not need flooring???
Blinds will cost a lot more than 500 and flooring will cost a lot more than 3000 unless your house is tiny.
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25-05-2020, 11:44   #27
jlm29
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Don’t underestimate the costs of all the things you won’t be buying second hand but can’t do without.
Crockery
Cutlery
Kitchen utensils
Small appliances (kettle, toaster, hoover etc etc)
Mop and bucket,
Duvets
Pillows
Sheets
Curtains & blinds
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25-05-2020, 11:49   #28
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Might be worth it sourcing appliances and furniture in the north.

The in laws were looking at a sofa in DFS, travelled up north and bought the same one in DFS there. Saved maybe 250e overall (not to be sniffed at). The shop assistant said it's the same vans used all over so no real difference.

Obviously, you then have the issue if you need to return anything you will have to drive.
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25-05-2020, 12:37   #29
seabelle
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I think the most important thing is not be daunted and to shop around. I got curtains on sale in Dunnes for around a fiver when we moved in they were grand until I worked out what I wanted for the windows, I now have some made to measure blinds from blinds2go that I'm really happy with.

Amazon basics crockery is very good for the money and one of the patterns is usually on discount. You can usually get utensils for very little from aldi or lidl or even dunnes just to get you started.

The Emma mattress is very highly rated and often has discounts of 40-45%.

Tk Maxx and Homesense have a lot of homeware discounted you can get high thread count sheets for the same price as more basic ones in another shop.

People are very generous, even little housewarming gifts of crockery etc could go a long way in stocking your new kitchen.

You can start with the minimum and add things as needed.
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25-05-2020, 12:56   #30
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Don't forget about fuel / plumbing and other infrastructure.

Water, probably mains but if not you might need some serious money on well and purifying equipment, and septic tanks.

Are all the gutters in good condition and roofing etc. with good drainage everywhere.

Is it mains gas or do you need potentially new or serviced oil burners, tanks, pallets of home heating fuel, etc. Is the fuse board in good condition and certified? Many electricians will not touch a property first without it.

Is there good pressure in all the taps, is the heating and all radiators working. Do you need to zone any of the heating, does it need to work with a smart thermostat?

Finally security, cameras and alarms can be crazy money, but a good idea at least to scare people off if you might own the place for a while before moving in.
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