Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
21-07-2019, 19:06   #76
Capt'n Midnight
00:00
 
Capt'n Midnight's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post
Food chain competition?
Sharks in the estuaries and rivers,
Salties and fresh water crocs.
And the giant lizard megalania running about the place too
And a 10m snake, the Bluff Downs giant python ambushing at water holes.

With some overlap in niches.
Capt'n Midnight is offline  
(2) thanks from:
Advertisement
22-07-2019, 01:43   #77
Adam Khor
Moderator
 
Adam Khor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 4,497
Reading up on Pallimnarchus and it seems like it may have been even bigger than salties.

This is from a 2012 article reporting on a possible Pallimnarchus find:

Quote:
University of New South Wales palaeontologists who found the fragment of crocodile jaw state that this individual was at least eight metres long and there may have been others of its kind that were even larger, perhaps reaching the size of Sarcosuchus, a twelve metre long Crocodylian that lived during the Late Cretaceous geological period and preyed on dinosaurs.
(Note that they make a mistake here, as Sarcosuchus lived in the early Cretaceous, not late Cretaceous)

Quote:
The fossil was discovered by undergraduate Bok Khoo from the University of New South Wales on July 10th, it is part of the lower jaw (dentary). The fossil bearing strata consists of several layers which represent ancient river deposits. The dig site is close to the current course of the Liechardt River and the sediment is disturbed when the water levels rise and this helps to expose new fossil finds. The river may help reveal fossil material but being close to the river does have its drawbacks. The location is known for its Saltwater and Freshwater crocodiles as well as sharks and sting rays. The field team have to be wary of attacks from extant crocodiles as they search for the fossilised remains of extinct ones.
Quote:
Gilbert Price, a palaeontologist with Queensland University has commented that the jaw bone represents a substantial individual, one crocodile that was very probably an apex predator in the region. The fossil has yet to be accurately dated, it belongs to either the Pleistocene or the earlier Pliocene Epoch. The Pliocene ended approximately 1.6 million years ago, the Pleistocene Epoch followed and lasted until approximately 10,000 years ago. The fossil is eroded, a result of the river action and the teeth have been lost but the tooth sockets which measure up to four centimetres in diameter indicate that this predator had very large, conical-shaped teeth.

Professor Mike Archer of the University of New South Wales described the fossil as “weird” and he could not rule out that this fossil find could represent a new species.
The bite marks of the largest known species, Pallimnarchus pollens, have been found on the bones of the giant marsupial Diprotodon, which grew as large as a modern rhinoceros and would've been the largest available prey:

Adam Khor is offline  
(3) thanks from:
26-07-2019, 01:04   #78
Adam Khor
Moderator
 
Adam Khor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 4,497
Reassessment of giant caiman Mourasuchus' osteology

https://palaeo-electronica.org/conte...us-amazonensis





Mourasuchus was a contemporary of the better known Purussaurus, and like it, a member of the caimanine group of the Alligatoridae family. It was also a giant, growing to maybe around 10, possibly up to 12 m long, but its small teeth and skull structure would suggest it was specialized in much smaller prey, maybe even by filter-feeding, fullfilling a role similar to that of the filter-feeding Stomatosuchus of the Cretaceous.

This would've allowed it to coexist with the equally large Purussaurus and Gryposuchus without competing for food with them.
Adam Khor is offline  
Thanks from:
27-07-2019, 19:18   #79
Adam Khor
Moderator
 
Adam Khor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 4,497
On the sphagesaurid Caipirasuchus

These little land crocodiles of the Cretaceous may have had a greater ability to vocalize than modern day kinds.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...051?via%3Dihub

Adam Khor is offline  
(2) thanks from:
15-09-2019, 20:35   #80
Adam Khor
Moderator
 
Adam Khor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 4,497
Mystery of Mystriosaurus:

https://www.sachspal.de/mystriosaurus/

Adam Khor is offline  
Thanks from:
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet