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Best Donegal Slang

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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 279 ✭✭ shogunpower


    oul dog for the hard road, and the pup for the foot path....


  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ sweet girl


    Toul. As in "Now dont say ye werent toul" (sp??)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 104 ✭✭ Aligator Farmer


    Here's one my Dad uses, which roughly translates as "He hasn't much common sense"

    "He's a spoon fed gulpin"


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,282 Carrickman


    It's cat since the dog died.


  • Registered Users Posts: 254 ✭✭ mamakevf


    Kwet footerin' wi yersel.:D


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  • Registered Users Posts: 278 ✭✭ EAFC_rdfl


    'clouster' is a good wan. i mind lads from killybegs not even knowin what it meant.
    its wile handy as can cover a lot of situations, mainly for somebody thats awkward or messy.
    for flukes sake is another one. abeen the road = above the road


  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,150 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    St. Johnston/Porthall people have some weird pronunciations. Its a half Scottish dialect. You would hear them say something like "Its aye raining" (its always raining) and things like boards and doors are pronounced bourds and dours or dowers! Instead of saying "you're wrong" they would say "yer wrang"

    Puts me in mind of a guy who went into a little bakery shop in St. Johnston and was looking at the selection of lovely things on display. He seen a couple of items that caught his eye and pointing at them he asked the girl who was working....."Is that a gateaux or a meringue" The girl looked at him and said "No, you're right"


    (think about it)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,103 North_West_Art


    whats the difference between Bing Crosby and Walt Disney?

    A: Bing sings, but Walt Disney


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,498 ✭✭✭✭ padd b1975


    I lived up there for a year in mid 90s, a popular one i remember for driving fast was " stagin" .


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,484 ✭✭✭ Ave Sodalis


    Jaysus, the half of these I didn't even realise they were only said in Donegal :D It's no wonder I got rare looks the last day! :p

    The only one I pulled up about was when I said ''Awk it's grand'' to someone from England.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 610 muckish


    Driving directions fray Manor heading tay Newton


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,619 fontanalis


    I suppose it's as good a place as any

    A Ballybofey man is on mastermind and it's his turn for his special subject. Magnus Magnusson welcomes Mr Doherty to the hot seat;

    "So Mr Doherty you have chosen Jazz as your special subject, are you ready"
    "Sure am sir"
    First question "What was the name of Miles Davis' first album?"
    "Don't know sir"
    Second question "What was the name of the famous Jazz Club in New York that gave it's name to one of that citys nick names?"
    "I couldn't tell you sir"
    Doherty keeps getting bombared with really difficult questions on jazz and gets none right.

    The buzzer goes and Magnus Magnsusson announces that Mr Doherty scored zero points.

    The camera stops rolling and Magnus Mgnusson says "excuse me Mr Doherty but I fond it unusual you didn't get any of your specialist questions right, do you know anything about Jazz?"

    Mr Doherty says "aye jazz sir, that film with the big shark sure I seen it about a hundred times"


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,202 ✭✭✭ eskimocat


    sup_dude wrote: »
    Jaysus, the half of these I didn't even realise they were only said in Donegal :D It's no wonder I got rare looks the last day! :p

    The only one I pulled up about was when I said ''Awk it's grand'' to someone from England.

    I thought that for years!! still get caught out with people asking what am i saying!! then add in a smattering of irish into the mix and you get some really funny looks...

    Thought on another one, Donegal got a right pasting... during the storm :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 133 ✭✭ Rds1989


    Wow i havent checked on this thread in a few days, great response guys. We sure do have some weird words and phrases. Does anyone know if it any of them come from ulster scots or donegal irish


  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,150 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    Howl yer whisht (be quiet)


  • Registered Users Posts: 692 Durnish


    aren't the ones like didny canny, wasny etc all Ulster-Scatty, from the Laggan area, good farmland round the Finn, Foyle and so on? Some of the western stuff is from Glasgae dialect, like fiddle music it's all interlinked, say vray? (UlsterFrench) . Then there's Irish sentence construction and stopping, like like, but, hi.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 279 ✭✭ shogunpower


    where ye fray,
    porthaall,
    hows yer purdies?
    big or smaall?
    how de ye eat them?
    skins n aaall.
    where ye fray?
    porthaall


  • Registered Users Posts: 555 ✭✭✭ slimboyfat


    Sure its a grand soft day.


  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ sweet girl


    Im not sure if this one has been posted before,"sure im only taking a hand at ya"


  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,150 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    where ye fray,
    porthaall,
    hows yer purdies?
    big or smaall?
    how de ye eat them?
    skins n aaall.
    where ye fray?
    porthaall
    Long time since I heard that :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,069 ✭✭✭ Penfailed


    porthaall

    'cuse my ignorance. Where's Portaall? :confused:

    Gigs '21 - Stendhal Festival (July), Stendhal Festival (August), [s]Liam Gallagher & Idles[/s], King Kong Company, Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs, The Undertones, And So I Watch You From Afar

    Gigs '22 - And So I Watch You From Afar, Teenage Fanclub, Mogwai, Stendhal Festival, The Fratellis, Clutch, Kurt Vile & The Violators, The Cure



  • Moderators, Regional North West Moderators Posts: 43,150 Mod ✭✭✭✭ muffler


    Penfailed wrote: »
    'cuse my ignorance. Where's Portaall? :confused:
    Porthall is the proper title but gemerally called Poorthaall by the locals.

    Its about 3 miles from Lifford on the St. Johnston road - google link


  • Registered Users Posts: 76 ✭✭✭ The Mary Clarke


    sweet girl wrote: »
    Im not sure if this one has been posted before,"sure im only taking a hand at ya"
    Yeah I would definitely consider that "Donegal". I am a blow in for the past eleven years and only heard this used by Donegal people.
    One that really got me was "Starved".
    I worked in a fish factory when I first came here. One evening we had to work late and one of the guys said to me "I'm starved"...I told him not to worry that I had loads of extra sandwiches and that he was more than welcome to them:o:o...He just meant that he was cold!
    Some of the sayings I have seen posted on here I have heard in other parts of Ireland so I would not say that they are just Donegal Slang but others...damn I almost needed a translator when I moved here first :o
    Great County and Great people though:):)


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,956 ✭✭✭✭ retalivity


    yer some uasceain
    wrote aff
    Inta the tide withem!


  • Registered Users Posts: 51 ✭✭✭ Dr. Fell


    byte wrote: »
    "the Gap"

    Pronounced "The Geap"


  • Registered Users Posts: 24 Delber


    What about "Young Cutty" for a girl or a "wheen" for a few or just plain old "SIR"


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,236 ✭✭✭ Dr. Kenneth Noisewater


    Twas tight goin' sir

    Aye that cuttys wile door

    No harm to you but.....(said when theres bad news on the way)

    Put you that there pint down hai


  • Registered Users Posts: 176 ✭✭ odonnellcarey


    Also very confusing to people in Dublin in my experience is denoting your shopping as "messages", eg "got a few bags of messages in dunnes earlier". It's like speaking in tongues when ya speak fast on a phone to a local I'm told :pac:

    Have to disagree with that. Messages is a common term for groceries in Dublin.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,103 North_West_Art


    just thought Id mention, in case anyone didn't know, that 'messages' refers to actual written messages that people would have left for each other in the local shop years ago in days before the telephone..


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,501 Madam


    quare

    As in 'how's the quare one the day?'(does that mean 'odd' or something else, never could understand that one?) or how about 'It's a quare day the day'.


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