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Apartment Chargers SEAI grant

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  • 15-04-2023 11:26am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 494 ✭✭


    Is there a thread with news about how this is faring?

    Does anyone know whether contractors have started offering solutions yet? How is getting a good enough connection to the ESB grid working out?



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6,632 ✭✭✭zg3409


    I suspect it's all talk no action.

    You really need a management company with bags of cash (most don't have spare money) and apartment owners that are heavily pro EV, think D4 or green party, otherwise I can see it fly.

    There is companies that specialist in this area such as ePower.ie or easygo.

    If you are an individual apartment owner I suggest you quietly get a full proposal together and once it's fully budgeted and written up then bring it to annual meeting to be voted on. Typically if asked management companies just say no or spend years "working on it"

    Some people with designated spaces have run cables from their home fuse board all the way to the parking space (with permission). This gets over the costs (you pay yourself) and billing etc. Even an ordinary household socket at parking space with give you 2kWh per hour rate enough for around 100km a day.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,120 ✭✭✭innrain


    I'm helping our OMC with selecting a proposal for the grant. Very few companies replied, some with absolutely no interest. From those who replied, all proposed banks of 22kW chargers and MIC upgrades even though nobody knows the current available capacity. The proposed billing models are quite unsustainable, making the price per kWh quite high probably more expensive than public charging. Then there is the mater of the people on the board not understanding the terms used. It is already six months since we started and we didn't select a company yet not to mention putting in the.grant proposal.



  • Registered Users Posts: 494 ✭✭EarWig


    I expect that the real sticking point for many will the ESB connection. The grid isn't up to it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 23,409 ✭✭✭✭ted1




  • Registered Users Posts: 6,632 ✭✭✭zg3409


    The grid is up to it, particularly if it's load managed and charging is overnight. St night the existing site supply will have lots of excess. Most cars only need 3 to 7kW at night, and that's easy to provide. Even if supply upgrades were required these could be delayed until demand was there as in say 20% of cars were EVs. The existing supply to say a house is 60amp while chargers are typically 32 amp max and putting in an instant shower is about 40 amp and no one blinks an eye at a triton shower going in. Even if everyone went EV overnight it would be relatively easy for the grid to manage. Indeed it may help the grid as cars will probably avoid peak times and drive overnight demand when there is typically excess renewables such as wind. The grid manages for example in the ad break for the late late you show or Ireland soccer match when everyone puts on their kettles at once (10 amps). Supplies to apartments are already very big, with lots of excess at night.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 494 ✭✭EarWig


    Thanks for the replies. It was one excuse given to me by the Managing Agents.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8 oDerak_man


    Similar experience in my development. Management company unwilling, information about the grant and initial quotes I've got and passed to OMC director was discussed but no progress/decision in 6 months. They understand that it would be good to take advantage of the grant, but my impression is that until 20-30% of people have EVs, there's very little motivation to go through the hassle (and justify expenses). Another excuse I've got from OMC was a 'liability' to look after chargers long term. Hopefully by not giving up, we'll get somewhere after AGM.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,120 ✭✭✭innrain



    It really depends. Some newer developments with lifts and pumps would have extra capacity. However, installing banks of 22kW it will waste capacity for no particular reason. When asked some companies proposed load balancing but at double the cost of the charger plus annual costs for licensing. For those with the meters beside the car parks it would be easier to have each apartment wired for charging from their own meters and have load balancing to prevent overload, but grant guidelines forbids this method. The grant as it is now is not geared to extract the best solution for each case as the decision takers don't have enough knowledge to take the right decision. The OMCs are at the mercy of the service providers and if you ask the right questions they loose interest.



  • Registered Users Posts: 23,409 ✭✭✭✭ted1


    think about it every apartment will have a 4 ring hob that can draw 2 kw and a oven that will draw 5 kw

    so thats 7kw load in apartment between 5 and 7

    so at night time that’s capacity is free. For every apartment to use. I,e no difference in supply required.


    with load balancing the chargers could work during peak hours without any issues.


    in summary management agents are not qualified to make comments about the grid and are full of nonsense



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,434 ✭✭✭McGiver


    Legislation needed. Email your TD and SEAI. The only way to solve it - bring it into attention.



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