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Children Hospitalised in Dublin from taking Cannabis Jellies

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,567 ✭✭✭Princess Calla


    There's been a few similar cases.

    I'd say the sweets weren't put away high (no pun intended) enough and the kids found them.

    Some kids are very determined when it comes to reaching goodies.

    Not condoning it in the slightest (I personally wouldn't have them in the house), but accidents happen.



  • Registered Users Posts: 80,225 ✭✭✭✭Overheal


    Glad they're alright.

    Garda Press image

    Per the article above, the problem isn't natural cannabinoids, but products containing synthetic cannabinoids:

    In a statement, the HSE explained: "Synthetic cannabinoids are man-made chemicals produced to mimic the effects of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound in cannabis.

    "Often, products do not contain THC but instead they can contain a synthetic cannabinoid which will produce similar, more potent effects.

    "They will greatly increase the risks of a drug emergency occurring because they produce more intense adverse effects. Their use has caused many serious poisonings, mass poisonings and deaths internationally in recent years."

    It was added that these "counterfeit edible products" are made in "clandestine laboratories".

    Furthermore, an analysis carried out by Forensic Science Ireland found that a number of cannabis edibles recently seized were found not to contain any THC and only "new and extra risky synthetic cannabinoids."

    Which sounds pretty "clandestine" and bombastic for lacking any detail on what these synthetic compounds are - the reader is left to imagine



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,078 ✭✭✭Quantum Erasure


    it'd be the same kind of stuff thats in 'Spice' that was sold in the headshops, way worse than regular Cannabis. Hope the kids don't suffer any lasting effects



  • Registered Users Posts: 83,509 ✭✭✭✭JP Liz V1


    Where was these bought, online?



  • Registered Users Posts: 29,828 ✭✭✭✭freshpopcorn


    Maybe but I'd say some would know people who could get them sorted.

    They are expensive tough.

    The kids will probably be fine.

    Just judging from previous cases of when this happened.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,323 ✭✭✭Oscar_Madison


    I’m sure somone will stop by and provide a link for you any moment now😀



  • Registered Users Posts: 83,509 ✭✭✭✭JP Liz V1




  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 6,754 Mod ✭✭✭✭Raichu


    As said above these were not cannabis jellies. They were made with synthetic THC (or spice). Dirty, nasty chemicals that are not even remotely like cannabis.

    Poor chaps, hope they’re okay. Parents need to give their heads a shake though. Accidents happen but not with these things. It’s not an accident it’s negligent.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 83,509 ✭✭✭✭JP Liz V1


    Will the parents be investigated and prosecuted



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,957 ✭✭✭ceadaoin.


    I mean they probably still would have to go to hospital even if it was actual THC.

    Its legal where I am and I don't think the edibles packaging is a blatant rip off of other sweets aimed at kids like that one, plus it is hard to open so hopefully it keeps kids from investigating and accessing. At least the stuff you can buy in the regulated stores is like that anyway. I don't know why any parent would risk buying something that has packaging like that. A kid will definitely try it if they come across it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,657 ✭✭✭donaghs


    Post edited by donaghs on


  • Registered Users Posts: 470 ✭✭archermoo


    My question would be how much of that is an actual increase and how much is people not taking their kids to the doctor for it when it was illegal.



  • Registered Users Posts: 80,225 ✭✭✭✭Overheal


    I’d say a lot of it is having a market flooded with legal edibles. Would you bake a sheet of illegal brownies in the same house as your kids? Probably not. That **** stinks.

    Not hard to imagine the US public full of bad parenting either. Doubt there is a ton of awareness about the dangers of kids vs edibles.



  • Registered Users Posts: 470 ✭✭archermoo


    And not even just bad parenting. You also need to factor in the "is it worth getting arrested over" too. As well as the "don't go to the doctor/hospital unless you're about to die" mentality that the US healthcare system fosters.



  • Registered Users Posts: 80,225 ✭✭✭✭Overheal


    I mean if it’s legal and I have an NHS sure why not go to the clinic or hospital. When you have a $1500 deductible you’re looking to wait something out if it’s not an emergency.



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 6,754 Mod ✭✭✭✭Raichu


    i don’t think it’s the case when it involves under 18 but I know that the hospitals won’t report to garda if you’re an adult anyway.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 51 ✭✭polysteamtoken


    It's not an increase due to it becoming legal it's due to the parents being incapable of being a parent. So they of coarse must blame drugs instead of being responsible. Very typical.



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