Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact [email protected]

Offered credit note should I be entitled to a refund?

  • 18-05-2022 8:57pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8,319 ✭✭✭


    Hi folks,

    Bought an electronic item last summer. 5 year warranty. Developed a fault and went back for repair. Part couldn't be sourced so shop are offering me a credit note for the value of the item. Could I insist on a refund?

    Kind regards,

    Mick



Comments

  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 66,523 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    They need to offer a repair, a replacement or a refund (at their discretion as to which). I don't consider a credit note to be a refund.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,319 ✭✭✭micks_address


    Does it matter if the shop is based in northern Ireland?



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,155 ✭✭✭✭Jim_Hodge


    Agreed, A credit note is not a refund nor one of the remedies available to them.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,024 ✭✭✭standardg60


    I've always wondered at whose discretion which of those applied, it's never made clear.

    Anyway a credit note is Bs, kick up a fuss and demand a refund, most people will accept the credit note, companies know this and chance their arm



  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 66,523 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    Could be entirely different, different jurisdiction with their own rules that I'm not aware of - the Irish 3 Rs won't apply directly anyway.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,024 ✭✭✭standardg60




  • Registered Users Posts: 10,155 ✭✭✭✭Jim_Hodge


    UK is the 3R as well.

    Was it a manufacturer's warranty though?



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,319 ✭✭✭micks_address


    Actually warranty provided by shop. They haven't said they won't do a refund just offered credit note. I replied asking for refund



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,661 ✭✭✭whippet


    If you do get offered a refund you might expect to have this discounted by virtue of the fact that you have had use of the product for 1 year. I'm not sure what level that discount could be deemed reasonable.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,319 ✭✭✭micks_address




  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,703 ✭✭✭Xterminator


    if you get a credit note for full value of item after 1 year use, that's not bad. you don't have to accept the offer - its not one of the 3 r's.

    strictly shop could have repaired item, replaced it or issued a refund pro-rated for a year of use eg approx 4/5ths of cost of item.

    If you get 100% of the purchase price back, and intend to buy a replacement, then it works out well. if you don't intend to replace it then dont accept.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,319 ✭✭✭micks_address


    trouble is i replaced the item as it was away for so long for repair.. i don't need another item from the shop so we will see.. not looking for a major disagreement with the shop as they are very good to deal with



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,319 ✭✭✭micks_address


    Shop offered full refund without any argument so can't say fairer than that.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,593 ✭✭✭theteal


    The discretion thing comes back to what is seen as "reasonable". The shop has to offer one of the 3 R's. You do not need to accept the offered resolution but the only way you can attempt to force the issue is with the small claims court. There you'll have to explain why you rejected one of the normally reasonable R's and hope they agree with your line of thinking. That's a fair bit of effort and people don't want the hassle so "at the shops discretion" has become the norm even though it's not actually an official thing.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,319 ✭✭✭micks_address


    the worst i had recently was a furniture company offered us 75 euro credit for their store in lieu of a faulty electric recliner we bought off them.. i was like no thank you.. id rather have working furniture. they agreed to replace the sofa for a new one



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,024 ✭✭✭standardg60


    Personally i think the repair option should be removed and the other two should be entirely at the customer's discretion. Who's going to accept or have faith in a brand new product which immediately requires fixing.

    Many moons ago we bought a TV from one of the main retailers having moved into our first house. Intermittently when turned on the top inch of the screen would be blank and the rest of the picture would be distorted. When i brought it back they insisted on returning it to the manufacturer for diagnosis. Two weeks without a TV later they called and said it was back in store, so up i popped. They wheeled it out, flipped over the tag attached, and smugly announced that no fault was found and that was that.

    Livid and frustrated, i told them to plug it in there and then, hoping the Gods would smile on me, and lo and behold said distortion appeared. Unbelievably they still refused to replace it and said they'd have to talk to head office. Told them i'd be taking legal action and left, thankfully received a replacement the next day, from a frankly extremely rude and obviously sickened manager.

    I haven't darkened the door of that retailer since.



Advertisement