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Help reqd with electronic project....correct power supply voltage

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,544 ✭✭✭ ozmo


    Make sure wires to solenoid are thick enough to carry the current?

    Thats a fair amount of amps to carry.

    Also - any switch between power and solenoid - especially if transistor/mosfet - can it deliver the 3.5 amps?

    Possibly also the power-supply is not able to really deliver the current its supposed to?

    The datasheets on that page you link to - dont match the product description exactly - this one suggesting a 24v power supply would be more normal?


    If its getting very warm and has to be on a long time - keep some more energy saving devices in mind such as latching solenoids that dont need constant power...


    https://docs.rs-online.com/e808/0900766b81655db9.pdf

    “Roll it back”



  • Registered Users Posts: 20,266 ✭✭✭✭ Tell me how


    Are you using the power supply to power anything else? If so, the available power will obviously be impacted but most low voltage devices are low wattage so if its indicator lights or the likes, I wouldn't worry about it just yet.

    Is there a adjustment screw on the PSU which might be turned down so the actual output voltage is less than expected?

    When you apply the power to the solenoid, if you use your hand to pull the pin, does it then extend and stay extended once you let go? Have you tried to energise it with nothing applying a force against the pin?

    If you have connected the power supply using wires the same size or larger as the wires on the solenoid, that shouldn't be a problem (make sure any connections are tight). If I'm guessing, it's either your PSU isn't providing the power you think it is, or the solenoid is mechanically impeded, either seized within itself, or something pushing against the pin.

    If you have a multimeter, measure the voltage being output by the PSU, while the solenoid is being attempted to be moved.



  • Registered Users Posts: 20,266 ✭✭✭✭ Tell me how


    How did you get on with this?

    Curious if you identified the problem and what it was.



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