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How to keep a garage dry when a wet car gets parked in it

  • 12-10-2021 2:25pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 70 ✭✭ lyda


    My garage is largely air tight and really well insulated - including the garage door. It has underfloor heating, an HRV and the solar inverter (which also makes heat) is in it. The idea is that it's supposed to be a workshop and a garage. One issue that remains is down to the normal Irish root cause of a building problem: it rains a lot. Therefore my car sometimes comes in super wet.

    Automatic car washes have a stage where water is blown off the car. Doesn't dry it perfectly, but gets a lot of water off. Anyone ever tried hooking up such a thing to their garage?



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 168 ✭✭ Larry Bee


    Would a dehumidifier do the trick?



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,075 ✭✭✭ Allinall


    If your garage is airtight, where is all the water going to go?



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,073 ✭✭✭✭ elperello


    Best not to put your car in the garage when it is wet.

    The moisture will be in every nook and cranny and can lead to rust problems.

    Better to leave it outside or in a carport until it dries out.

    If you have to drive into the garage perhaps you could leave the door open to allow some air circulation.



  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 42,812 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    Automatic car washes have a stage where water is blown off the car. Doesn't dry it perfectly, but gets a lot of water off. Anyone ever tried hooking up such a thing to their garage?

    $50 solution to a $5 problem. as above, the main issue is ventilation, not the wet car.



  • Registered Users Posts: 571 ✭✭✭ CreadanLady


    Leave the car outside. There is no need to put a car in a garage nowadays unless it is an extremely valuable or rarely used vintage car.

    Garages were only commonly built with houses years ago because old cars with mechanical ignitions were extremely sensitive to damp and also the fit of the cars was not great and they often leaked and they rusted easily.

    That is all history now and modern cars have no need to be kept in doors.

    Putting in some sort of car drying equipment in your garage door is absolute madness of the highest order. More like a €5000 solution to a €5 problem.

    The MFV Creadan Lady is a mussel dredger from Dunmore East.



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  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 16,102 Mod ✭✭✭✭ DOCARCH


    With that spec of garage surely you could have your people dry the car first? 😄



  • Registered Users Posts: 820 ✭✭✭ wildwillow


    I always garage my car, even during the day if it is parked for a while. You can leave the garage door open for a while to dry off and I hope the floor slopes to door or drains.

    Never having to clear ice or snow is a bonus as is being in the house without getting wet, especially with babies and shopping. I can't understand why most people store junk in their garages.



  • Registered Users Posts: 70 ✭✭ lyda


    The answer might be a dehumidifier, yes. I was just wondering if there might be more... exciting answers.

    My garage has ventilation - as I noted it has an HRV. The HRV in my house does great with the humidity from showers and cooking, but a car brings in a lot of cold water. And while I heat the garage, it's only to 15C. And since I do heat it I'd rather not leave the door open for ages.

    I put my car in the garage for a number of reasons. One is because it's an EV it's a bit cheaper to warm up on cold days.

    And yes, an air blaster at the door would be expensive. On the other hand, it's an air blaster. Which is objectively nifty.



  • Registered Users Posts: 30,507 ✭✭✭✭ Lumen


    A warm garage is particularly useful if you have an electric car as it prevents the battery from getting cold, extending range and increasing efficiency.

    Also for motorbikes and classic cars.



  • Registered Users Posts: 571 ✭✭✭ CreadanLady


    unless you live in the midlands on high ground, it doesn't get cold to any significant degree in ireland. We have a remarkably mild climate. It doesn't get hot and it doesn't get cold.

    If EVs struggle in the Irish climate, then what hope have they got of catching on in places that have actual seasons.

    The MFV Creadan Lady is a mussel dredger from Dunmore East.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,740 ✭✭✭ MrMusician18


    A leaf blower?



  • Registered Users Posts: 946 ✭✭✭ iColdFusion


    Im not an expert in these things but surely there cant be that much water on the car as you have been driving it, then it goes into the garage, a certain amount of water gets absorbed by the floor but the garage floor is heated so that dries up, HRV removes damp air, a certain amount gets absorbed in the walls and any dampness left in the air gets blown out the next time you open the garage door? Unless you are seeing mould build up at the moment then like others say a dehumidifier is the way to go but sounds excessive.

    I'd be more worried about about parking a wet car in a poor quality unheated garage TBH as that will never dry out.



  • Registered Users Posts: 571 ✭✭✭ CreadanLady


    I think OP is blowing this up into a big issue when really there is not need of it at all. Sounds excessive.

    The MFV Creadan Lady is a mussel dredger from Dunmore East.



  • Registered Users Posts: 70 ✭✭ lyda


    To be fair, my whole garage is excessive so it seems like a valid solution that keeps to the theme.



  • Registered Users Posts: 30,507 ✭✭✭✭ Lumen


    It's not a question of struggling. They just work a bit more efficiently and effectively. Approx 80% of new cars sales in Norway are full electric (BEV). They have "actual seasons".



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,384 ✭✭✭ MAULBROOK


    A mop



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