Advertisement
We've partnered up with Nixers.com to offer a space where you can talk directly to Peter from Nixers.com and get an exclusive Boards.ie discount code for a free job listing. If you are recruiting or know anyone else who is please check out the forum here.
If you have a new account but can't post, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help to verify your email address. Thanks :)

Rain and bad weather - recommendations

  • 28-07-2021 7:00am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    I'm looking to buy rain gear for cycling a short way to work. I'm thinking i need trousers and a jacket (and anything else recommended)

    Can anyone give me advice as to what shop I should go to and what should I buy? I've had varying types of waterproofs over the years but currently have nothing.

    Dublin city shops will work best for me......and maybe Dun Laoghaire too. Anyone got any recommendations, advice?

    Oh and probably need skins/thermals/gloves too???



Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 388 ✭✭ ARX


    Instead of full rain trousers for a short journey, you might consider these: https://www.rainlegs.com/en/home.

    Kind of dorky-looking but will keep your upper legs and knees dry, which (if you have mudguards) are the parts of your legs that get wettest.

    Decathlon does probably everything you'd want at a reasonable price - might be better to visit the website as their website is awful.

    Really the first thing you want is full-length mudguards, without those you (and what's worse, your bike) will just get soaked in filthy gritty water sprayed up from the road.

    EDIT: A helmet cover will keep your head dry - a peaked helmet (mountain bike helmet) will keep the worst of the rain out of your eyes as well.



  • Registered Users Posts: 15,173 ✭✭✭✭ Enfilade


    Gaiters would be a good thing to have to keep the feet dry, will work with any shoes and far easier to get in and out of than regular cycling overshoes. They roll up small too so can be easily carried. Much better than carrying a spare pair of dry shoes on a wet day. I use something similar to these on short journeys on the wek days. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Vaude-Bike-Gaiter-short-Short/dp/B003MWQIPE

    Tip : wear them under not over your trousers other wise the water can run down the cuffs into your shoes.

    🚴‍♂️



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    Interesting - I had not thought of gaiters and the rain legs look like a good option.

    I'm thinking of also getting one of those grey jackets that are fully reflective when under light. Any recommendations?

    I want to also get a helmet.

    Does anyone know the best one stop shop for everything I am looking for. Decathlon is not so convenient for me and I would like a bricks and mortar store.



  • Registered Users Posts: 775 ✭✭✭ sy_flembeck


    provizsports.com


    Sign up for their email and get 15% off your order. Or sign up and wait for the email offering 25% off that come about regularly enough. They had 20% off with this code last week. May still work: SHINE20



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    Great I'll sign up on Provizsports.com

    Thanks for your help



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 3,168 ✭✭✭ Breezer


    If you’re going to be cycling in all weathers, I’d recommend you buy a Gore-Tex Shakedry rain jacket. It is hands down the best piece of cycle clothing I own. Totally waterproof, breathable, light, and folds/rolls up to nothing.

    It wasn’t cheap but it was fantastic value. Unfortunately, it only comes in black, which put me off at first, but I compensated by buying a yellow helmet and some bright lights.

    If you decide you want a Pro Viz jacket instead, I have a green one in size S I want to sell (I replaced it with the Gore-Tex). Feel free to PM me.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,505 ✭✭✭ DeepBlue


    @Breezer

    If you’re going to be cycling in all weathers, I’d recommend you buy a Gore-Tex Shakedry rain jacket. It is hands down the best piece of cycle clothing I own. Totally waterproof, breathable, light, and folds/rolls up to nothing.

    What's the temperature range on the Shakedry? Could you use it comfortably from say, March to October, and not get sweaty in it? How then does it fare in the colder months?



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,168 ✭✭✭ Breezer


    I’ve no idea what the official temperature range is. I Googled there and I can’t find it quoted either.

    My personal experience is that it’s so light and breathable that it doesn’t really add any heat. What it does is keep the wind and rain off really well, so it’ll keep you warmer that way. Then you just layer up appropriately underneath it.

    Then again, I get sweaty if I look at my bike. I don’t seem to sweat any more with the Shakedry than without it, though.



  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,694 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Weepsie


    Don't get a shskedry of you use a backpack though. I have one though and can confirm it's excellent


    Columbia outdry ex is probably the best waterproof stuff you can get, but it's heavier than shakedry and not cycling specific. They've a trail running one in the range that is light enough and breathable though



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,505 ✭✭✭ DeepBlue


    Oops, I didn't phrase my question properly - I meant more how did it perform from your personal experience rather than official retailer specs.

    My use case for it would be to enable me to not skip a cycle because it's drizzling or light rain. It would be a genuine game changer to slap a jacket on in those conditions that wouldn't just get uncomfortably sweaty over 40 - 60K at a medium effort. It would really open up a lot more cycling days if that was possible at temps of 13 to 18C in our humid climate.



  • Advertisement
  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 15,694 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Weepsie


    If it's drizzling, or light rain and 13-18 and humid, a gilet should suffice



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,505 ✭✭✭ DeepBlue


    Wouldn't really have a problem getting home with a gillet and arm warmers (nanoflex) but wouldn't really start out that way as it can be difficult to warm up in the wet and a pretty miserable experience.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    Loads to think about here. How is the proviz for heat - will it keep me warm in the winter?



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee




  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    20% off code today so made a little saving. Looking forward to getting my jacket. Thanks for recommendation.

    Now on to think about water proof trousers or rainlegs...



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,168 ✭✭✭ Breezer


    I had it along for a long trip in just such weather conditions today. I really think it’s perfect for that, in terms of keeping me from getting drenched in a shower. I also commute in all weathers and find it great. The portability was a big draw for me: it rolls down to almost nothing and can easily fit in a jersey pocket.

    Having said that, I sweat a lot on the bike. As in, I arrive into work needing a shower after a 7km commute (uphill, in my defence!) I don’t seem to sweat any more with the Shakedry that without it, and it does keep the really drenching rain and the wind off very well. But I’m probably not the best person to guide you on its breathability. You may want to read a few reviews online, which generally rate it very highly.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,124 ✭✭✭ Rechuchote


    I've worn a Proviz for years, and it's finally starting to let in a bit if I wear it for more than an hour in heavy rain. Made of tiny balls of glass, it reflects very, very well.

    I don't know if this is still the case, but check with Proviz if it's still necessary to buy a slightly bigger size than you'd normally wear because the jackets fit quite snug.

    What's a good set of rain trousers for a woman with plenty of weight on?



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,526 ✭✭✭ Skill Magill


    Ponchos/capes seem quite a good option, in particular

    the peoples poncho

    Or the cleverhood rover, there's a comparison here :


    The cleveland is american so big money in duty and shipping costs but the preferable of the two. Can't seem to find an irish/European stockist



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,589 ✭✭✭✭ tomasrojo


    I don't have much to add on the subject of rain gear. Adding mudflaps to the mudguards on my bike was a really big improvement. I just wear hiking-style shoes in the rain now. Chain lasts way longer as well

    I followed instructions online to make homemade mudflaps, but you probably can buy something better looking from one if the websites that specialises in Dutch-style accessories.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    Mudguards are definitely essential! I got some fitted a few weeks ago and they made a big difference the other day cycling in that bad rain



  • Advertisement
  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 42,306 Mod ✭✭✭✭ magicbastarder


    i think it was Plastik or Raam who said they'd bought mudflaps off this crowd:

    https://buddyflaps.com/



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,589 ✭✭✭✭ tomasrojo


    Oh yeah, mudguards are, for sure. But mudflaps make them that bit longer (without getting nasty kerb strikes and so on), protecting your feet and your chain (and your down tube cables) from the filthy road water the front wheel sprays up. You only need a front one, though I have a rear one as well, because I use trailers.


    (The buddyflaps are for not spraying people in the face on group rides, I think, which is another good reason for a rear mudflap.)



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    My new mudguards came with mudflaps which is handy!



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    My Proviz arrived! Am delighted with it. So comfortable and looks great.

    Feel very safe cycling in the dark in it.

    Thanks for all the help.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,503 ✭✭✭ billyhead


    Any recommendations for a lightway trousers overall for wet weather?



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,581 ✭✭✭ BabysCoffee


    I got a pair of weatherproof trousers from Trespass. They do the job for me - but I am literally on the bike no more than 15 mins each time I cycle.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,124 ✭✭✭ Rechuchote


    I'm rather tempted by this high-tech American poncho, which you can loop to your thumbs (or, er, handlebars?) and which has loops for a belt, and a hood with a peak - comes in various colours including lurid yellow and startling Handmaids scarlet

    https://www.wolfandbadger.com/uk/randy-red-rover/



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,607 ✭✭✭ cletus


    Oooh, you could be little red riding hood



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,482 ✭✭✭ Flinty997



    If this is commuting, mine is around 14k each way, and not fit. I find there a tendency to over dress. After cycling for 5~10mins you've generally warmed up a lot so if you are warm leaving the house you are overdressed. I tend not to go waterproof as that makes me too hot. Instead I have waterpoof panniers, put clothes in that, and change at work. I wear light layers that I can put on or off as I need to be. if they get wet they dry fast. More important for me is to be able to keep the wind out at the front.

    However hands and feed get cold. I find shoe covers handy, and also decent gloves. One light, lone heavy. Also something that goes around the neck and over the mouth and nose for cold days. I do have loose fitting, tracksuit/leggings for colder days.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,124 ✭✭✭ Rechuchote


    Proviz isn't designed for warmth but for brightness and rainproofness. If you wear a couple of thin merino layers under it you should be warm enough, though, and the microfleece collar keeps the neck warm.



Advertisement