Advertisement
We've partnered up with Nixers.com to offer a space where you can talk directly to Peter from Nixers.com and get an exclusive Boards.ie discount code for a free job listing. If you are recruiting or know anyone else who is please check out the forum here.
If you have a new account but can't post, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help to verify your email address. Thanks :)

Redwater - symptoms to look for

  • 16-07-2021 5:04pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    I can't use the search function on the new set-up, so I'll start a new thread.

    I Have a cow here about 10 years old. Spotted her this morning, lying down a long way away from the rest of the herd. She passed dung ok, but no signs of passing water. I tried to get her to pass water by rubbing under the tail, but no luck. Checked her again there this evening and she was standing up chewing the cud. Spent some time looking at her but no water passed. Being a exceptional hot day doesn't help either.

    She is empty looking and her eyes are pestered by flies. The only cow that seems to be that way.

    Any ideas on how to get her to pass water?

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭ tanko


    if you rub her hard enough and for long enough in the right spot she should pass water.

    if she does have it and it isn’t caught soon enough she’ll start to stagger when walking with blood loss and will feel cold to touch. Had to do a blood transfusion with one here years like this ago but she recovered.

    is she bought into the farm long?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,767 ✭✭✭ Lime Tree Farm


    If she is home bred, it's unlikely to be red water.

    We had one in the early stages. With the herd but agitated, the urine was frothy and clear.

    Could you bring her in,

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gaAaPLTH4HA



  • Registered Users Posts: 734 ✭✭✭ longgonesilver


    If it is still early stages she should be running a high temperature. If you stay looking at them for an hour and then start moving them around so she gets nervous, she might pass water then.

    Have you considered everything else? Is she milking?



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    Looked at her again. She looks ok now. Up and grazing with the herd. Tried rubbing her again but no water.

    She is dry now and due to calf in about 2 months. Bought in to the herd at 18 months in 2012.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭ tanko


    If she’s on your farm nine years you’d think she would have got redwater long before now if she was going to get it but anything is possible i suppose.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 701 ✭✭✭ minerleague


    Have to agree with this, keep them walking was another thing people did ( although that was mainly where they had to go a distance to drink water )



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,767 ✭✭✭ Lime Tree Farm


    Not if they have red water,walking with the loss of blood can bring on a heart attack. If possible, transport back to the farm yard is preferable.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 8,699 Mod ✭✭✭✭ greysides


    I always found animals with Redwater were easy enough to get to urinate.

    Redwater is initially associated with pipestem diarrhoea, and later with constipation ("the murin"). The vulval membranes will go pale as the condition worsens.

    The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress. Joseph Joubert



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭ tanko


    Summer mastitis could be a worry with that cow, some amount of feckin flies about.



  • Registered Users Posts: 520 ✭✭✭ jd06


    A little off topic

    But if been checking for red water too but this evening I saw 3 of my 20 cows with what looks like a skint treat bloody like but its just on the outside

    I think this happens every year hopefully they will be ok. Suckler cows are not the easiest to get in.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 2,769 ✭✭✭ Good loser




  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    Well, I got to answer my own question today. Have a cow with redwater. Last night, I noticed that she didn't run with the others up to the gate. Just walked up behind them. I was giving them a handful of meal as I wanted to load them up from some land that's a mile or so away. I tried her then and she wouldn't pass water.

    Checked her again this morning and not happy with her. Gone a bit thin and lethargic. Brought her home and she was lying down when I opened the ramp of the trailer. She passed dark red water as the vet was putting in a bladder tube (not sure of proper term). She got a blood transfusion which was tough going as other cow slow to give blood. She is home bred, 4 years old.

    Anyway maybe it will help others spot the symptoms.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭ tanko


    Flutter valve??

    You wouldn’t think a cow which has been on the same ground all her life would get redwater.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    Her own mother was bought in though, so maybe not fully immunised. Would overuse of Ivermectins lead to less immunity, I wonder?

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,097 ✭✭✭ 50HX


    Thanks Patsy for the description and update



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    Vet was saying Bayticol only lasts about 6 weeks.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,767 ✭✭✭ Lime Tree Farm


    I texted the Vet morning after he gave cow blood transfusion for redwater to say she has passed urine (kidneys functioning). He texted back to say - see her passing dung was just as important.



  • Registered Users Posts: 701 ✭✭✭ minerleague


    epsom salts best if not passing dung, doesn't seem to be as many ticks on cattle this year



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,862 ✭✭✭ orm0nd


    Often one of the earliest signs b4 the animal shows any signs of sickness is the dung will shoot out straight from the behind. It will be soft and runny.

    The treacle 'mularky' is to prevent the dry murrin which the vet advised Lime Tree Farm about.

    This can be fatal and it's a cruel death for any beast. We used to use molasses when we had problems on rented ground.



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 140 ✭✭ jaginsligo


    I have a case of it at the moment, bought in cattle for summer grazing but all injected for it as I has one last year as well but survived and recovered fine. Vet says the younger they get it the better chance they have, had tb test yesterday so he injected him again and he makes up his own "purge" organic powered that he has got 2 doses of. Looks a bit better today and ate a bit of nuts. Fingers crossed

    Hard to catch them from the start as the guys say they just look off but by yesterday he was lying on his own. Hope the cow makes it Patsy



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,887 ✭✭✭ Base price


    How is she today Patsy.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,767 ✭✭✭ Lime Tree Farm


    Keeping the grass grazed down helps prevent it, but equally young stock need to be exposed to it on rough grazing to acquire immunity.

    Watch bought in 10 days in for symptoms, I believe once they are infected and treated, that's it they won't get it again

    Years back two of bought in got it, one died the other survived a bold transfusion. The remainder were given a double dose preventative, they weren't in the better of it, sickly looking and set back for a week.



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,469 ✭✭✭ patsy_mccabe


    She's that bit better, thanks. She passed clear water this morning and dung was only a bit on the solid side. Just let her out there now, near the shed and she went away grazing.

    By the way, Vet said not to give her hay as it will cause constipation. Grass and meal better.

    " And on the riverbank forgotten the river's name."



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,229 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    Is land high in P / K more prone to red water



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,023 ✭✭✭ tanko


    I’d say definitely not 😂😂. I’ve an out farm that has more rushes, briars and whins than grass on it, gets one bag/acre of pasture Sward in April every year, had to get soil samples done on it a few years ago, the results couldn’t have been any worse. I only graze enough cows and calves on it to stop it from getting completely overgrown and if i put an animal on it that was wasn’t grazing on it as a calf they’d have red water within a few weeks, it’s alive with ticks.

    Is red water not a crap land problem?



  • Registered Users Posts: 152 ✭✭ Omallep2




  • Registered Users Posts: 1,767 ✭✭✭ Lime Tree Farm


    Another habitat for tick is the overgrown margin behind an electric fence



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,229 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    It’s not a crap land problem, but can be farm / vein specific. The best of land in Meath can have it. I think there is a vaccine



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 2,769 ✭✭✭ Good loser


    My grandfather in Roscommon in the thirties had rented land land some 20 miles away, minded by a local. my uncle (his son) told me how from time to time a telegram would come from the minder that an animal had redwater. After some years of this he stocked the land with horses one winter.

    They ate the ground to the butt, and lower. That ended his problem.



Advertisement