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Revising my salary expectation during the interviewing process. How to go about it?

  • 24-06-2021 12:45pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭ JackieChang


    I think I lowballed myself in the first interview.

    I've since found out that the job will be more difficult than I anticipated. I've also found out the starting salary for the department. This is from talking to staff unofficially.

    I'd like to go back and bump my salary expectation by about 5k. (This will bring it to 50k).

    What's the best way to go about this? Even ignoring my specific situation, has anybody gone back and bumped up their expectation before? General tips for doing this? How was it recieved? Were you successful? I do have potential offer from another company on the table.

    I will have the second round interview tomorrow. It will be a more technical interview so they will have no say on salary.

    Do I reach out to HR? Or wait for the final 3rd round interview to bring it up?

    I guess I could say - "after the 2nd round interview I've found that the job is a bit tougher than anticipated. I'd like to increase my expectation to 50k" ? Never done this before. Any advice appreciated. If I don't at least try, and end up getting the job, I know I'll just be miserable.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 14,306 ✭✭✭✭ jimmycrackcorm


    Wait until the final interview. When they ask if you have any questions before the end, ask for clarification on the salary.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭ JackieChang


    ask for clarification on the salary.

    This is what I want to know how to do.

    So I ask for clarification on the salary.

    They say "Yes you told us it's 45k."

    Then I say: ????

    I also want to know is this something people regularly do, or will I ruffle feathers.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,716 ✭✭✭✭ Interested Observer


    I'd wait until you actually get an offer before going back and talking about salary again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 79 ✭✭ Dublin Lad2021


    I'd wait until you actually get an offer before going back and talking about salary again.

    As a recruiter I would agree with this


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,938 ✭✭✭ PokeHerKing


    Salary negotiations start after a job offer.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭ JackieChang


    As a recruiter I would agree with this

    Ok. So how do you go about asking this? Thanks for the offer but I'd rather at least 50k. Simple as that?


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,902 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    Ok. So how do you go about asking this? Thanks for the offer but I'd rather at least 50k. Simple as that?


    "Thanks, it's great to get an offer, and I'm really keen to take the job. There are a couple of things I'd like to ask about.

    Firstly, what's the story with <<some other aspect you want to ask about, but think they'll find easy to answer and make you look good, eg formal training opportunities>>.

    Also, during the interview, I learned more that this particular role is larger than I expected because <<briefly name some ways>>. Given that, a more realistic salary range is probably 47 - 53k. Is there any chance of movement on that?"



    Likely you will have more to ask about - but don't make the money the first or last topic in your list. It's not the only factor, but you don't want them to think you're a pushover either.

    I'd always say to name a range, not a figure. It gives a basis for discussion. It lets them feel they achieved a bargain by offering you the low end - and it signals to them what sort of rise you'd like to see once you're proficient at the job.


  • Registered Users Posts: 752 ✭✭✭ JPup


    I agree with all the advice here. To add, when you have an offer in hand you are in a strong bargaining position. The company wants you. They’ve just completed a long and probably quite tedious hiring process. They want it finished now and to get you started. The chances of getting a reasonable request for a small increase at that stage are pretty good unless there are very rigid remuneration guidelines in place (eg in the civil service).

    Also, don’t think only in terms of salary. Lots of other perks. Consider bonus package, pension contributions, will they cover you health insurance, other allowances etc. Ideally you’d get your base salary up, but those other benefits can be very valuable too.


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