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Neglected field?

  • 15-06-2021 7:56pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 367 ✭✭ billy_beckham


    Hi folks,

    Just looking for some advice, have about 4 acres lying idle for a few years, we had a horse but he died, it's overgrown etc. Want to tidy it up a bit and am wondering what is the best way, get someone to put a few cattle on it or get it cut?

    Thanks


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 17,909 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    Get a contractor in to mulch it.

    Then look at keeping it grazed


  • Registered Users Posts: 367 ✭✭ billy_beckham


    _Brian wrote: »
    Get a contractor in to mulch it.

    Then look at keeping it grazed

    What does mulch it do?
    How much would it cost?

    Excuse my ignorance ðŸ˜


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 1,621 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Albert Johnson


    The quickest and most straightforward way would be to get a contractor to mulch or top it. Mowing it will leave swarths of material on the ground that will take a long time to break down if not removed somehow. The mulcher or topper will turn the resulting material into small pieces that should break down quickly.

    If mulching or otherwise isn't an option for whatever reason (cost, availability, access, ground conditions ect) then you could always fence it and get someone to put a few horses or donkey's on it for the summer. Donkey's in particular are good for clearing off rough ground in my experience. They'll eat most things, are fairly docile, are low maintenance, respect fences and don't poach land excessively.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,843 ✭✭✭ 49801


    Some fencing and pigs will sort it.
    Pig on spit end of summer


  • Registered Users Posts: 367 ✭✭ billy_beckham


    The quickest and most straightforward way would be to get a contractor to mulch or top it. Mowing it will leave swarths of material on the ground that will take a long time to break down if not removed somehow. The mulcher or topper will turn the resulting material into small pieces that should break down quickly.

    If mulching or otherwise isn't an option for whatever reason (cost, availability, access, ground conditions ect) then you could always fence it and get someone to put a few horses or donkey's on it for the summer. Donkey's in particular are good for clearing off rough ground in my experience. They'll eat most things, are fairly docile, are low maintenance, respect fences and don't poach land excessively.

    What would it cost, roughly, to mulch 4 acres?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,804 ✭✭✭✭ Reggie.


    What would it cost, roughly, to mulch 4 acres?

    Think its roughly €50 an acre. Not sure tho


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,909 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    Reggie. wrote: »
    Think its roughly €50 an acre. Not sure tho

    That’s what it is round these parts as well.

    Neighbors cleaned up a bit of neglected land beside us last autumn, did a savage job in fairness.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,232 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    If you can get them to go very slow the cut material will be smaller
    A light coat of slurry (1500gal/Ac) afterwards would be no harm


  • Registered Users Posts: 815 ✭✭✭ Sacrolyte


    Dry cows. Strip grazed. Move wire every day. Be like a billiard table after em. Dairy stock usually be quietest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,323 ✭✭✭ endainoz


    Best option would be to bring in a mulcher or a shredder and then to top the regrowth. The finer the grass is cut the better as it will rot down quicker and add fertility back into the soil and make the field a bit more productive. If the field is out of production for a while keep a look out for rag wort was it will have to be removed assuming youll be putting animals in soon after. If the field isnt being grazed soon it wouldnt be much of an issue.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,909 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    endainoz wrote: »
    Best option would be to bring in a mulcher or a shredder and then to top the regrowth. The finer the grass is cut the better as it will rot down quicker and add fertility back into the soil and make the field a bit more productive. If the field is out of production for a while keep a look out for rag wort was it will have to be removed assuming youll be putting animals in soon after. If the field isnt being grazed soon it wouldnt be much of an issue.

    That raises a question on my mind.
    Would the mulching break down ragweed so small as to not pose a danger ??


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,323 ✭✭✭ endainoz


    _Brian wrote: »
    That raises a question on my mind.
    Would the mulching break down ragweed so small as to not pose a danger ??

    Ragweed and ragwort are two different plants, but assuming your referring to ragwort, I suppose the risk would be less. They would certainly rot a lot quicker anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 367 ✭✭ billy_beckham


    endainoz wrote: »
    Best option would be to bring in a mulcher or a shredder and then to top the regrowth. The finer the grass is cut the better as it will rot down quicker and add fertility back into the soil and make the field a bit more productive. If the field is out of production for a while keep a look out for rag wort was it will have to be removed assuming youll be putting animals in soon after. If the field isnt being grazed soon it wouldnt be much of an issue.

    Anyone know of someone in the West Wicklow area who would do this?


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,909 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    endainoz wrote: »
    Ragweed and ragwort are two different plants, but assuming your referring to ragwort, I suppose the risk would be less. They would certainly rot a lot quicker anyway.

    Oh.
    Those terms are used interchangeably locally. Yea Ragwort is what I was wondering about.


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