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First dentist visit at what age?

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 699 ✭✭✭ The Mighty Quinn


    My 16 month old has 8 teeth or so at this stage. Should she see a dentist for a check up yet or is that way too early?

    I'm just not sure how you'd get her to cooperate to look into her mouth :)


Comments



  • Mine had all their baby teeth before visiting the dentist. Gets them used to it






  • If you avoid giving sugary food to your baby as doctors recommends they would have no issues with the teeth decay or obesity later on in life.

    Why Sugar is Bad for your Teeth and Health


    Sugar Should Be Avoided Before Age 2, early on the advice was before 3 years but someone pushing it down I would suggest to avoid sugar until they go to school when it becomes unavoidable.

    https://www.strong4life.com/en/feeding-and-nutrition/meal-planning-and-prep/why-added-sugar-should-be-avoided-before-age-2





  • Next time your in for a check up bring the baby with you, let the receptionist know when your making your appointment.

    They can sit on your lap, go up and down in the chair a few times, they may let the dentist ‘count the teeth’ or take a little picture or they may not but the important thing is to get them comfortable with coming.

    The worst case scenario is waiting until the child has pain to bring them to a dentist, they’ll always associate it with pain then!





  • She's 18 months old, she only got her first tooth at about 13 months, she has about 12 now. To our horror yesterday when she had her head back laughing we saw a hole in one of her top molars. She isn't given chocolate or sweets or fizzy drinks. She has dilute, but it's so light it barely colours the water and a hint of flavour (she won't drink water at all!). She eats berries and bananas and things, maybe they're at fault. I don't know. She's got no pain at all with it, but we're sick that her teeth of a few months old are already failing. Bad parents!!!





  • Can't see how to edit a post.


    I'll add that her breakfast is porridge and cow's milk each morning, she has snacks like a slice of apple, some cheese, banana/mandarin etc, glenisk baby yogurt with no added sugars, she doesn't get biscuits, bars (except organix oat bars, ingredients are just oats, raisin, apple etc, no added anything).

    Maybe it's too much fruit causing the tooth damage, but it doesn't seem to be excess fruit. We brush her teeth also, but it's a challenge, she doesn't like it, so can be hard to ensure all teeth are getting a good brush each time, kinda hoping some of the flouride toothpaste will even help.



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  • Perhaps time to introduce to real food in a form of mince meat and mince liver?

    fruits and fruit drinks can be very acidic, consuming highly acidic foods and drinks every day can harm teeth without the right aftercare. Eating fruits — and other acidic foods — can eventually cause tooth enamel to wear away, leading to things like dental erosion and tooth sensitivity.





  • I bring my boys once a year starting at age 3. One is cooperative, the other isn’t but it’s mostly about them getting accustomed to it for now.





  • Oh she eats real foods all the time for her lunch and dinners, with everything made from scratch, there are no packet sauces or jars, no added salts or salty stock cubes etc. She eats everything from shepherds pie to thai curry to homemade soups to spaghetti bolognese to beef stew to poached eggs, very very wide varied diet.





  • Sounds very like my little ones diet. Fruit is a favourite snack in our house.

    Are you sure its a hole? Don't mean to sound patronising but a friend of mine was really worried about a bit of tooth decay in her 2yo which had disappeared the next day and she assumed must have been fleck of blueberry.

    Some people are more prone to tooth problems unfortunately.





  • Paediatric specialist dental surgeons recommend children start visiting a dental surgeon at one years of age.

    First primary tooth erupts at 6 months.

    So called nursing bottle caries/baby bottle syndrome can be a concern so indeed prevention is better than cure.



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  • Just to mention it's a fact that carbs is none essential food source. Giving kids high carbs diet will give no favour in later life.



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