Advertisement
We've partnered up with Nixers.com to offer a space where you can talk directly to Peter from Nixers.com and get an exclusive Boards.ie discount code for a free job listing. If you are recruiting or know anyone else who is please check out the forum here.
If you have a new account but can't post, please email Niamh on [email protected] for help to verify your email address. Thanks :)

Worth salvaging old bike?

  • 08-06-2021 4:56pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,074 ✭✭✭ carrotcake


    My kids are old enough now for us to go on little cycles together on trails near our house, but I haven't cycled in years. I've just dug my old bike out of my parents' shed, after it sitting there unused for 15 years, and was expecting to just put some new tubes and tyres on, and away I'd go.

    There were some heavy things resting on the handlebars, but the wheels don't appear to have bent. It's pretty dirty, but I'm sure it just needs a scrub.

    The main problem is that the trigger shifter gears seem to be broken, which wasn't the case when I last used the bike. Nothing happens (no click or change of gear) when trying the one on the right, but I was able to click between 1 and 2 on the left a couple of times before that gave up too. It wouldn't go to 3.

    I'm asking myself now is it worth fixing the bike, or should I just get a new one. If I was more serious about cycling I'd get a new one, but realistically it will probably only be used around 10 times per year for a few years, and then disappear behind a load of rubbish in the shed again. :)

    Does anyone have any idea of what sort of a bill I would be looking at to bring the bike to a service and get it up and running again?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 630 ✭✭✭ gn3dr


    carrotcake wrote: »
    My kids are old enough now for us to go on little cycles together on trails near our house, but I haven't cycled in years. I've just dug my old bike out of my parents' shed, after it sitting there unused for 15 years, and was expecting to just put some new tubes and tyres on, and away I'd go.

    There were some heavy things resting on the handlebars, but the wheels don't appear to have bent. It's pretty dirty, but I'm sure it just needs a scrub.

    The main problem is that the trigger shifter gears seem to be broken, which wasn't the case when I last used the bike. Nothing happens (no click or change of gear) when trying the one on the right, but I was able to click between 1 and 2 on the left a couple of times before that gave up too. It wouldn't go to 3.

    I'm asking myself now is it worth fixing the bike, or should I just get a new one. If I was more serious about cycling I'd get a new one, but realistically it will probably only be used around 10 times per year for a few years, and then disappear behind a load of rubbish in the shed again. :)

    Does anyone have any idea of what sort of a bill I would be looking at to bring the bike to a service and get it up and running again?
    More than likely just needs new gear cables due to rust in the old ones. Cheap fix.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,583 ✭✭✭ randomname2005


    carrotcake wrote: »
    My kids are old enough now for us to go on little cycles together on trails near our house, but I haven't cycled in years. I've just dug my old bike out of my parents' shed, after it sitting there unused for 15 years, and was expecting to just put some new tubes and tyres on, and away I'd go.

    There were some heavy things resting on the handlebars, but the wheels don't appear to have bent. It's pretty dirty, but I'm sure it just needs a scrub.

    The main problem is that the trigger shifter gears seem to be broken, which wasn't the case when I last used the bike. Nothing happens (no click or change of gear) when trying the one on the right, but I was able to click between 1 and 2 on the left a couple of times before that gave up too. It wouldn't go to 3.

    I'm asking myself now is it worth fixing the bike, or should I just get a new one. If I was more serious about cycling I'd get a new one, but realistically it will probably only be used around 10 times per year for a few years, and then disappear behind a load of rubbish in the shed again. :)

    Does anyone have any idea of what sort of a bill I would be looking at to bring the bike to a service and get it up and running again?

    Probably chain and rear cogs, and depending on what speed bike it is you might have an issue sourcing a replacement chain and cogs at a reasonable cost. Most new bikes have 8+ gears on the back, getting 5 and 6 cam be hard. I only saw an option for 7 or more on chainreactioncycles.com it might be that things are stuck, or need oil, more than replacement. Did the trigger/twister move and have no impact or was it just not possible to move?

    It is hard to give a price without more information and others here would have more info than me. Depending on the bike and how good it was initially, it might, as much as I dislike saying it, be cheaper to pick up a second hand replacement or get a new one in the likes of aldi or halfords


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,700 ✭✭✭ Type 17


    carrotcake wrote: »
    My kids are old enough now for us to go on little cycles together on trails near our house, but I haven't cycled in years. I've just dug my old bike out of my parents' shed, after it sitting there unused for 15 years, and was expecting to just put some new tubes and tyres on, and away I'd go.

    There were some heavy things resting on the handlebars, but the wheels don't appear to have bent. It's pretty dirty, but I'm sure it just needs a scrub.

    The main problem is that the trigger shifter gears seem to be broken, which wasn't the case when I last used the bike. Nothing happens (no click or change of gear) when trying the one on the right, but I was able to click between 1 and 2 on the left a couple of times before that gave up too. It wouldn't go to 3.

    I'm asking myself now is it worth fixing the bike, or should I just get a new one. If I was more serious about cycling I'd get a new one, but realistically it will probably only be used around 10 times per year for a few years, and then disappear behind a load of rubbish in the shed again. :)

    Does anyone have any idea of what sort of a bill I would be looking at to bring the bike to a service and get it up and running again?

    Post a pic of the bike, and a close-up of the gear-shifters.
    It's probably worth fixing, as tying up new-bike money on something you'll only use occasionally probably isn't worth it.

    PS: Shimano (and others) still make 6-speed freewheels (although they, like everything else, may be Covid-scarce right now).


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,953 ✭✭✭ 07Lapierre


    New tyres, new tubes, new cables and a bit of oil on the chain should be enough to get it up and running.

    If your unlucky, you might need a new chain, derailleurs, cassette etc.

    Post a photo(s) of the bike.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,074 ✭✭✭ carrotcake


    Thanks for the replies, everyone. Feeling more optimistic now.

    The triggers on the left are moving as normal, and it is clicking - and changing gear(!) - between 1 and 2 again. It still won't go up to 3, though. As for the ones on the right, I can push all the way forward, but it doesn't click up to the next number. If I try to go down a gear then the trigger only moves a few mm and then won't go any further.

    Here are some pictures of the bike... https://imgur.com/a/Iym8sRO
    If you want any more then I can take them tomorrow when the light is better.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 289 ✭✭ f1000


    Nice Townsend. Most parts look in good condition and still have life. Bit of TLC & a few new bits as suggested above


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,188 ✭✭✭✭ Enfilade


    I was expecting far worse in terms of rust but doesn't look bad at all. Had a Townsend in my teems which did many a mile and took some battering.

    🚴‍♂️



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,627 ✭✭✭ cletus


    I'd start out with a new set of cables, and give the chain and cassette a good clean. Are the tubes holding air?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,491 ✭✭✭ martyc5674


    Just lube the gear cables in place- highly unlikely they need to be replaced.
    Slide the outer cables up along the currently exposed inner cable(be good to clean the exposed inners first if you have some degreaser)—- then lube the inner cable where you have slid the outer from, this will involve pulling the outer cables out from the slots on the frame.
    With the cables off move both derailleurs in and out to free them up- they should both want to spring out , and the rear one should want to spring back aswell.
    Bit of oil on the pivot points on both. That should do it for you.
    Do same WRT cables for your brakes.
    Bit of oil on the chain and it will be good for another 15 years!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 794 ✭✭✭ byrnem31


    Get a can of Gt85 and plaster the bike in it and leave it overnight. That will help losen/lube a lot of parts on it.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 2,700 ✭✭✭ Type 17


    Yep, a bike worth putting a few quid into for occasional/casual use.

    Tip: if the shifters aren't behaving, even after the cables are looked at/lubed/maybe replaced, it's because the grease on the little pawls inside the mechanism has solidified (always happens with older STI shifters left unused), but they are probably perfect (and hard to find now anyway) - take the cover off (usually a No.0 Phillips screwdriver) and first spray in loads of chain cleaner to melt out the old grease, and then blow the degreaser out with compressed air (or wait a few hours for it to evaporate) and then lube it with GT85 or light oil (don't use any chain lube that will set/thicken, like wet lube or wax).


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,074 ✭✭✭ carrotcake


    Thanks for all the tips, everyone.

    I haven't tried putting air into the tubes yet. I'll need to dig the pump out of the shed too. :)

    Anyway, great to hear that new life can be breathed back into the old bike without too much hassle!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,616 ✭✭✭ grogi


    Probably chain and rear cogs, and depending on what speed bike it is you might have an issue sourcing a replacement chain and cogs at a reasonable cost. Most new bikes have 8+ gears on the back, getting 5 and 6 cam be hard. I only saw an option for 7 or more on chainreactioncycles.com it might be that things are stuck, or need oil, more than replacement. Did the trigger/twister move and have no impact or was it just not possible to move?

    It is hard to give a price without more information and others here would have more info than me. Depending on the bike and how good it was initially, it might, as much as I dislike saying it, be cheaper to pick up a second hand replacement or get a new one in the likes of aldi or halfords

    6, 7 and 8 speed chains are the same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,323 ✭✭✭ Macy0161


    I think from the images it's 7 speed? You can get 7 speed cassettes (and you used to be able to get freewheels and freewheel wheels too) and chains handy enough even in the likes of halfords. I'd start with cleaning/ degreasing and cables first though, and then chain.


Advertisement