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Right handed. Left handed etc.

  • 01-06-2021 9:24pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Q for ye.
    I have my right hand at top of the hurl and then when I hit from my hand on my strong side, I put my left hand underneath and strike, so my strong side is like the strong side of Joe canning, Patrick Horgan etc.
    Would this be classed as right handed and the the strong side is the ‘right side’

    Then for lads that grip the same way as me. Again, Right hand on top and left hand on bottom, but instead throw the ball under the hurl and hit off the opposite side of bas to me, like Anthony Nash for example
    Would this be classed as right handed with the strong side being the ‘left side’


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    The right-handed left-handed designation is determined literally by which side of your body you are hitting the ball at. If your side of choice is to the left of your body them you're left handed.

    The grip is another matter. Players have different grips which do not necessarily relate to their preferred side.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Rosita wrote: »
    The right-handed left-handed designation is determined literally by which side of your body you are hitting the ball at. If your side of choice is to the left of your body them you're left handed.

    The grip is another matter. Players have different grips which do not necessarily relate to their preferred side.


    Now I’m more confused by your first paragraph.

    “ is determined literally by which side of your body you are hitting the ball at”

    Don’t get this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    There are two sides to your body - the left and the right. If your throw a ball up to the left side of your body then you are hitting it left sided, and considered left handed and so on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Rosita wrote: »
    There are two sides to your body - the left and the right. If your throw a ball up to the left side of your body then you are hitting it left sided, and considered left handed and so on.


    So take Joe canning, he throws the ball up with his left hand and it’s on the left side of his body when he strikes it. I would not call him left sided though.

    Anthony Nash on a puck out is throwing the ball to the right side of his body. I’d call him as being left sided


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    obi604 wrote: »
    So take Joe canning, he throws the ball up with his left hand and it’s on the left side of his body when he strikes it. I would not call him left sided though.

    Anthony Nash on a puck out is throwing the ball to the right side of his body. But I’d call him as being left sided

    I'm just giving my understanding of it. Not sure why you would not regard a strike on the left side as 'left sided' (surely the clue is in the name?). But I wouldn't claim great authority on the matter. Just passing on what I've always understood.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,848 ✭✭✭ TheMilkyPirate


    obi604 wrote: »
    So take Joe canning, he throws the ball up with his left hand and it’s on the left side of his body when he strikes it. I would not call him left sided though.

    Anthony Nash on a puck out is throwing the ball to the right side of his body. I’d call him as being left sided

    He throws the ball up with his left hand and strikes it on his left side but you wouldn't consider that left sided?


  • Registered Users Posts: 559 ✭✭✭ Local_Chap


    I see it as being two different things, i.e. 'left handed' and 'left sided'

    Examples.
    Joe Canning hold the hurl with his right hand (right hand on top) therefore he is 'right handed' and he hits his free from his 'right side'.

    Tony Kelly holds the hurl with his right hand (right hand on top) therefore he is 'right handed' and he hits his frees from his 'left side'.

    TJ Reid hold the hurl with his left hand (left hand on top) therefore he is 'left handed' and he hits his frees from his 'left side'.

    I can't think of and left handed hurlers who whit frees from their right off the top of my head!

    You will also have exceptions to this with some hurlers e.g. Wally Walsh, who hold the hurl with his right hand but swaps hands when swinging and has his left hand on top when hitting the ball.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Local_Chap wrote: »
    I see it as being two different things, i.e. 'left handed' and 'left sided'

    Examples.
    Joe Canning hold the hurl with his right hand (right hand on top) therefore he is 'right handed' and he hits his free from his 'right side'.

    Tony Kelly holds the hurl with his right hand (right hand on top) therefore he is 'right handed' and he hits his frees from his 'left side'.

    TJ Reid hold the hurl with his left hand (left hand on top) therefore he is 'left handed' and he hits his frees from his 'left side'.

    I can't think of and left handed hurlers who whit frees from their right off the top of my head!

    You will also have exceptions to this with some hurlers e.g. Wally Walsh, who hold the hurl with his right hand but swaps hands when swinging and has his left hand on top when hitting the ball.


    that makes more sense to me now.

    The whole ‘handed’ v ‘sided’

    A hurler like canning, horgan, s callanan, DJ Carey are right handed……and right sided is their strong side.


  • Registered Users Posts: 778 ✭✭✭ Asdfgh2020


    obi604 wrote: »
    that makes more sense to me now.

    The whole ‘handed’ v ‘sided’

    A hurler like canning, horgan, s callanan, DJ Carey are right handed……and right sided is their strong side.

    Is there any parallel with the forehand and back hand in tennis particularly those tennis players who Play double handed forehand and backhand….Jimmy Connors being one that comes to mind.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Asdfgh2020 wrote: »
    Is there any parallel with the forehand and back hand in tennis particularly those tennis players who Play double handed forehand and backhand….Jimmy Connors being one that comes to mind.


    True. I guess Joe canning would be right handed and forehand would be his first choice


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  • Registered Users Posts: 648 ✭✭✭ DuffleBag


    Local_Chap wrote: »
    I see it as being two different things, i.e. 'left handed' and 'left sided'

    Examples.
    Joe Canning hold the hurl with his right hand (right hand on top) therefore he is 'right handed' and he hits his free from his 'right side'.

    Tony Kelly holds the hurl with his right hand (right hand on top) therefore he is 'right handed' and he hits his frees from his 'left side'.

    TJ Reid hold the hurl with his left hand (left hand on top) therefore he is 'left handed' and he hits his frees from his 'left side'.

    I can't think of and left handed hurlers who hit frees from their right off the top of my head!

    You will also have exceptions to this with some hurlers e.g. Wally Walsh, who hold the hurl with his right hand but swaps hands when swinging and has his left hand on top when hitting the ball.

    Joe Deane


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    DuffleBag wrote: »
    Joe Deane


    Joe Cooney (senior) too I think. Can’t remember but think he used to take some frees, maybe for his club.
    Gary Kirby maybe too. Though I think he was like Walter Walsh


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,492 ✭✭✭ joebloggs32


    Rosita wrote: »
    There are two sides to your body - the left and the right. If your throw a ball up to the left side of your body then you are hitting it left sided, and considered left handed and so on.

    You have it completely wrong

    A player who strikes of their "right" will favour a striking motion where the swing moves from right to left across their body...i.e. Joe Canning.

    A player who strikes off their "left" has a striking motion that swings the hurl from the left side to the right side of their body...i.e TJ Reid.

    I spent years in goals shouting at defenders to make a forward shoot of his left or right to make sure he was shooting off his weak side. They always knew what that meant.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    You have it completely wrong

    A player who strikes of their "right" will favour a striking motion where the swing moves from right to left across their body...i.e. Joe Canning.

    A player who strikes off their "left" has a striking motion that swings the hurl from the left side to the right side of their body...i.e TJ Reid.

    I spent years in goals shouting at defenders to make a forward shoot of his left or right to make sure he was shooting off his weak side. They always knew what that meant.



    Thanks for this. That clears it all up. The ‘striking motion’ etc.
    Your last paragraph is how I always naturally understood it too (without over thinking it or analysing it ;))). I always knew a lads weak side.

    Only then when I started thinking about it and was confusing the terms ‘handed’ and ‘sided’


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    You have it completely wrong

    A player who strikes of their "right" will favour a striking motion where the swing moves from right to left across their body...i.e. Joe Canning.

    A player who strikes off their "left" has a striking motion that swings the hurl from the left side to the right side of their body...i.e TJ Reid.

    I spent years in goals shouting at defenders to make a forward shoot of his left or right to make sure he was shooting off his weak side. They always knew what that meant.

    Not sure how you think I have it completely wrong when you just described what I was saying anyway. I just never mentioned the striking motion as that was self-evident. A player player who strikes off their right must throw the ball up on their right. To me that was the simplest way to explain it. Unless they are hitting the ball back behind themselves the striking motion has to be right to left. How could interpret what I was saying as meaning anything else is baffling.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,233 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Rosita wrote: »
    Not sure how you think I have it completely wrong when you just described what I was saying anyway. I just never mentioned the striking motion as that was self-evident. A player player who strikes off their right must throw the ball up on their right. To me that was the simplest way to explain it. Unless they are hitting the ball back behind themselves the striking motion has to be right to left. How could interpret what I was saying as meaning anything else is baffling.

    Maybe it’s the way your explaining it but I still don’t get you here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,237 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    obi604 wrote: »
    Maybe it’s the way your explaining it but I still don’t get you here.

    Maybe it is.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,069 ✭✭✭ timmyntc


    If you're striking off your right, you throw the ball up on your left side/left of the hurl - as thats where you are striking.


  • Registered Users Posts: 648 ✭✭✭ DuffleBag


    timmyntc wrote: »
    If you're striking off your right, you throw the ball up on your left side/left of the hurl - as thats where you are striking.

    You're just complicating things now with a left and right side of the hurley...

    Joe Canning - right handed, right sided dominant swing

    TJ Reid - left handed, left sided dominant swing

    Anthony Nash - right handed, left sided dominant swing (akin to Joe Canning hitting off his weak side)

    Conor Whelan - left handed, right sided dominant swing. (Akin to TJ when he hits off his weak side)

    Walter Walsh - wrong, in so many ways, and a swing that is usually cut out at under 8s


  • Registered Users Posts: 279 ✭✭ 1373


    A player who holds the Hurley with one hand , but strikes on the opposite side ,like Nash is what most of us call striking on our weak side . I don’t know how they manage to develop that as their strong side


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,077 ✭✭✭ arctictree


    1373 wrote: »
    A player who holds the Hurley with one hand , but strikes on the opposite side ,like Nash is what most of us call striking on our weak side . I don’t know how they manage to develop that as their strong side

    I'm like that and so is my son. I think it's just drilled into us to practice on our 'weak' side. So much practice turns your weak side into your strong one. Also, it's harder for an opponent to hook a left strike.


  • Registered Users Posts: 279 ✭✭ 1373


    arctictree wrote: »
    I'm like that and so is my son. I think it's just drilled into us to practice on our 'weak' side. So much practice turns your weak side into your strong one. Also, it's harder for an opponent to hook a left strike.

    Would a style like that actually have a weak side ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,077 ✭✭✭ arctictree


    1373 wrote: »
    Would a style like that actually have a weak side ?
    Not really. Just left and right.


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