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Restaurant Gift Voucher

  • 29-05-2021 10:43am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭


    I gifted a family member a restaurant voucher in Christmas 2020, and just went on there site to see when their planning on reopening, only to see they decided to closed down in June 2020, will the gift card holder be entitled to anything?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 24,647 ✭✭✭✭punisher5112


    I gifted a family member a restaurant voucher in Christmas 2020, and just went on there site to see when their planning on reopening, only to see they decided to closed down in June 2020, will the gift card holder be entitled to anything?

    No, if they're gone that's it I'm afraid.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,565 ✭✭✭endofrainbow


    I gifted a family member a restaurant voucher in Christmas 2020, and just went on there site to see when their planning on reopening, only to see they decided to closed down in June 2020, will the gift card holder be entitled to anything?

    you gifted them the voucher at Christmas 2020 6 months after they closed down in June 2020?


  • Moderators Posts: 6,830 ✭✭✭Spocker


    You might be able to do a chargeback, depending on when & how the card was purchased:

    https://www.ccpc.ie/consumers/shopping/gift-vouchers/
    ccpc.ie wrote:
    6. I was given a gift voucher for a company, however before I got to spend it they went out of business. What rights do I have?

    If you have a gift voucher for a company that subsequently goes out of business, unfortunately you have very few protections. Circumstances may vary depending on whether the company has closed down, gone into liquidation, examinership or receivership. However, there is a strong possibility you will lose your money. You can find out more about companies going out of business. If the voucher was purchased shortly before the company closed and the purchaser paid with card, contact your card provider about a possible chargeback.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,251 ✭✭✭✭road_high


    I gifted a family member a restaurant voucher in Christmas 2020, and just went on there site to see when their planning on reopening, only to see they decided to closed down in June 2020, will the gift card holder be entitled to anything?

    Dates look incorrect here? June 2021?
    Not having a go here but Gift Vouchers for the likes of anything hotels, restaurants, travel, leisure are extremely risky at the current time - let that be a warning to us all with them. One4All are a good option instead.

    Saying that, I bought my ma Hairdressing vouchers for Peter Marks at Xmas as i figured they are a fairly stable brand and company- but it was a risk all the same- she used them up last week!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭Prominent_Dawg


    Sorry I meant Christmas 2019, closed June 2020


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,647 ✭✭✭✭punisher5112


    Sorry I meant Christmas 2019, closed June 2020

    Not a hope


  • Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 28,428 Mod ✭✭✭✭Cabaal


    Yep, def not a hope on this one.
    Money is gone sadly


    To be fair in Dec 2019 you couldn't have known about the lockdowns, its just awful luck


  • Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭Prominent_Dawg


    Fabulous, so much for supporting local businesses


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,817 ✭✭✭Darc19


    Fabulous, so much for supporting local businesses

    If you noticed last year you would have been able to do a chargeback if you paid by card.

    And there's no need for a narky comment. Covid was not their fault. They had no choice but to close their doors. And whilst many have reopened, many closed down and the owners lost a hell of a lot more than your voucher.

    But sure what does that matter?


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,754 ✭✭✭✭Dav010


    Darc19 wrote: »

    But sure what does that matter?

    It doesn’t, businesses fail, the “why” makes it no less frustrating for the consumer who has lost their money through no fault of their own.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 25,236 ✭✭✭✭coylemj


    Fabulous, so much for supporting local businesses

    If it was a voluntary liquidation, they may still pay you. Legally, they owed you goods and services to that value so you were a creditor.

    If the place went bust then there was probaly a receiver appointed but you'd have been considered an unsecured creditor and got nothing as you'd be at the back of the queue, after employees (back pay and holiday pay) and revenue.

    If you can establish that it was a voluntary liquidation, see if you can find out who the directors were and contact one of them. You never know.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,817 ✭✭✭Darc19


    coylemj wrote: »
    If it was a voluntary liquidation, they may still pay you. Legally, they owed you goods and services to that value so you were a creditor.

    If the place went bust then there was probaly a receiver appointed but you'd have been considered an unsecured creditor and got nothing as you'd be at the back of the queue, after employees (back pay and holiday pay) and revenue.

    If you can establish that it was a voluntary liquidation, see if you can find out who the directors were and contact one of them. You never know.



    Most liquidations are voluntary as the directors see that a business has become insolvent and there is no short term return to solvent

    They are obliged then to look at examinership, receivership or liquidation. If liquidation is decided upon, they apply to the court to enter liquidation voluntarily.

    You also have voluntary liquidation with the addendum "decl solvency" - this is what you are thinking of. You find this sometimes when a company sells the business assets to another company or when owners retire or someone just decides to close but without leaving debts.

    Most liquidations are insolvent voluntary liquidations.


  • Registered Users Posts: 986 ✭✭✭Prominent_Dawg


    coylemj wrote: »
    If you can establish that it was a voluntary liquidation, see if you can find out who the directors were and contact one of them. You never know.

    Just decided it was a good time to retire.. Did inform me had I contacted in 2020 I would have been refunded


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