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Fat fascia

  • 06-05-2021 1:56pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    I'm replacing fascia boards with PVC ones and am unable to locate a supplier of anything but the thin 10mm ones that have to be fitted to a new wooden sub-fascia. In the UK it is common to replace with the thicker 18mm fascia and do away with the wood. I've tried several of the major builders suppliers to no avail. Is there some regulation that prohibits what appears to me to be a simple job?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 779 ✭✭✭ daydorunrun


    “You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try.” Homer.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    Thanks for that link. I'll give them a call. It's curious that none of the big builders providers carry the thicker fascia all the same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭ Calahonda52


    Price: easy to use the thin stuff to cover up, get paid and move on :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    The very nice people at the above link don't have 18mm fascia and advised me that the wooden backed 10mm covering fascia is generally used.
    Strange, when the 18mm PVC is widely used in the UK.
    Looks like I'll have to get the thin stuff and some creosote - sorry, creosote substitute.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    I'm still reluctant to put wooden backing behind PVC fascia when every YouTube video and merchant in the UK offers 18mm thick PVC which does not require wood backing.
    I've tried just about every builders providers in the Republic and they only stock 8mm thickness, even where they advertise the thicker board (would have to be specially ordered in from the UK, they say.)
    So, I was wondering if it would be possible to use 8mm fascia without a backing board. It is fixed at 40mm rafter tails so it shoud be as firm and stable as the thicker stuff. If anyone has done this I would appreciate a thumbs up.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,253 ✭✭✭ the_pen_turner


    i woulnt dream of using fascia without something solid behind it. not even the 18mm. iv never used it but i cant see how it would be that much stronger
    i would be worried about it bending a twisting from the sun

    how will you mount your gutters

    whats wrong with timber. if done propely it will last decades

    if you want longevity then put a strip of tricoya . its guarenteed for 40 years


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    Thanks for the response.
    As I understand it the 18mm PVC fascia is the standard in the UK. It is secured at rafter ends, which are 40mm apart and cannot/doesn't twist. Gutter brackets would also be fixed to rafter ends, through the fascia.
    The problem with timber is that it rots. Mine are just under 30 years old and have to be replaced - and I'm hoping the rot hasn't extended to the rafter ends. I don't ever want to do the job again even in 30 years, when I'll be in my eighties.
    I hadn't heard of Tricoya so I searched for it. It's a form of MDF composite board which is claimed not to absorb water. I can't see the advantage over PVC and I don't know how available it is in any case.
    Thanks again. I'll get it done eventually.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,253 ✭✭✭ the_pen_turner


    Banbh wrote: »
    Thanks for the response.
    As I understand it the 18mm PVC fascia is the standard in the UK. It is secured at rafter ends, which are 40mm apart and cannot/doesn't twist. Gutter brackets would also be fixed to rafter ends, through the fascia.
    The problem with timber is that it rots. Mine are just under 30 years old and have to be replaced - and I'm hoping the rot hasn't extended to the rafter ends. I don't ever want to do the job again even in 30 years, when I'll be in my eighties.
    I hadn't heard of Tricoya so I searched for it. It's a form of MDF composite board which is claimed not to absorb water. I can't see the advantage over PVC and I don't know how available it is in any case.
    Thanks again. I'll get it done eventually.

    i wouldnt trust the rafter tails not to twist. the timber fascia really adds a lot of strength.
    its a total nightmare fixing gutter brackets to the tails. you are very limited in placement and you cannot fix a joiner in between for example. it is very handy to be able to move a running outlet left or right to get a clear drop for the down pipe
    if the house is 30 plus years old then you tails will be narrower as well. they used lighter timber years ago

    tricoya has a guarantee for 30 plus years. but i was sugesting to put it under the normal pvc fascia. most good hardwares can get it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,253 ✭✭✭ the_pen_turner


    report back when you are doing it. i would like to see how it goes


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    Thanks again. Will do.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,036 ✭✭✭ Banbh


    Reporting back as promised. I gave up and used wood. Ah well, it was a dream.



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