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Too much sugar

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 82 ✭✭ roganjosh


    Hi guys. Looking for some advice here please. Sorry if this has been asked before. Recently got into homebrewing and have had two successful and tasty brews so far. Trying a cider at the moment and made a very stupid mistake before bottling. Worked out I had to add 46 teaspoons of sugar, but instead added tablespoons! Have I completely ruined this batch or is there any way to save it? Decided to leave it in the fermenter one more day to see what happens. Any advice would be greatly appreciated


Comments



  • If you measured the gravity before you added the sugar then try wait til it drops to there again and repeat the process properly this time.

    When you do bottle it have a plastic bottle and you can use that to monitor the pressure, if it’s getting close to bursting then you can crack off your caps on the other bottles and recap them to reduce the pressure and avoid bottle bombs.




  • Should be fine as long as the gravity is stable before you bottle it. It'll just end up a tiny bit stronger than planned.




  • That's a relief. Thanks lads. Does it mean adding sugar again before I bottle it?




  • Yes. Yeast eats sugar and produces alcohol and carbon dioxide. The sugar you've added will be eaten and the carbon dioxide will leave the fermenter in the usual way. To trap carbon dioxide in the bottles you need the bottles to be sealed while the yeast eats the sugar.




  • That's great mate, thanks for the help. Hope it turns out alright now
    BeerNut wrote: »
    Yes. Yeast eats sugar and produces alcohol and carbon dioxide. The sugar you've added will be eaten and the carbon dioxide will leave the fermenter in the usual way. To trap carbon dioxide in the bottles you need the bottles to be sealed while the yeast eats the sugar.


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