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Advice on being able to run at slower pace

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  • 27-04-2021 4:42pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 45


    Hi All,

    This might seem like a strange query but I'm looking to slow my pace so I can start running longer distances. I'm a novice when it comes to running really and I'm naturally getting quicker the more and more that I run. I'm mostly running 5 - 6k but I want to start running 10k more frequently but I've found that when I'm running the 5 or 6k that I'm doing it a pace where I feel like I wouldn't be able to run much further and I want to now manage my pace better, slow it down, and run the longer distances.

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 27,121 ✭✭✭✭GreeBo


    decolts wrote: »
    Hi All,

    This might seem like a strange query but I'm looking to slow my pace so I can start running longer distances. I'm a novice when it comes to running really and I'm naturally getting quicker the more and more that I run. I'm mostly running 5 - 6k but I want to start running 10k more frequently but I've found that when I'm running the 5 or 6k that I'm doing it a pace where I feel like I wouldn't be able to run much further and I want to now manage my pace better, slow it down, and run the longer distances.

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!

    As someone who effectively just asked the same question, you will see some good advice in the general running thread.

    Are you using anything (band, watch, phone, etc) to track your pace and also your cadence?

    There are a myriad of apps that will coach you into whatever pace you want, prompting you to speed up or slowdown until you are within your preferred zone.

    What sort of times are you doing for 5k at the moment?

    /edit to add
    You can also rely on your heartrate to slow you down, again any app/qatch combo will prompt you when your HR is too high, which typically equates to running too fast (unless you are on a hill!)


  • Registered Users Posts: 45 decolts


    I'm using a garmin watch to track pace.. cadence isnt something I would usually keep an eye on during a run. I must look into the coaching functionality as that would be something that could help me alright.

    Currently running a 5k in 24 minutes, I did a 10k a few weeks back at pretty much the same pace but feel like it was probably too quick a pace for me to keep doing it on a more consistent basis!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,340 ✭✭✭TFBubendorfer


    decolts wrote: »
    Currently running a 5k in 24 minutes, I did a 10k a few weeks back at pretty much the same pace but feel like it was probably too quick a pace for me to keep doing it on a more consistent basis!

    Just for comparison, 5k in 24 minutes was roughly the pace I was training most days when I was a 2:55 marathon runner. While I don't know what level you are at, your pace is probably too fast.

    Do the talk test. For at least 80% of your runs you should be able to comfortably chat away to someone running next to you. If you're gasping for breath, you're running too fast.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,622 ✭✭✭Enduro


    Here's an easy thing in theory.. hard to do in practice. run at the pace you can breathe through your nose.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    decolts wrote: »
    Hi All,

    This might seem like a strange query but I'm looking to slow my pace so I can start running longer distances. I'm a novice when it comes to running really and I'm naturally getting quicker the more and more that I run. I'm mostly running 5 - 6k but I want to start running 10k more frequently but I've found that when I'm running the 5 or 6k that I'm doing it a pace where I feel like I wouldn't be able to run much further and I want to now manage my pace better, slow it down, and run the longer distances.

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!

    using heart rate training could be useful for you

    try to find your max heart rate using max effort test (as mentioning anything about a formula here would lead to the usual 10 pages of circular discussion and humble bragging stuff) e.g. something like this https://www.brianmac.co.uk/hrm2.htm and then look at working out max aerobic heart rate from that and keep at / below that level for a good % of your running days.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 27,121 ✭✭✭✭GreeBo


    Enduro wrote: »
    Here's an easy thing in theory.. hard to do in practice. run at the pace you can breathe through your nose.

    FWIW I found that impossible!


  • Registered Users Posts: 295 ✭✭BeginnerRunner


    decolts wrote: »
    I'm using a garmin watch to track pace.. cadence isnt something I would usually keep an eye on during a run. I must look into the coaching functionality as that would be something that could help me alright.

    Currently running a 5k in 24 minutes, I did a 10k a few weeks back at pretty much the same pace but feel like it was probably too quick a pace for me to keep doing it on a more consistent basis!

    Can you see rolling average time per km? Cos if you can, you just need to keep watching that and run slow enough for it to come down. It'll probably feel like you're jogging on the spot at times tho!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,622 ✭✭✭Enduro


    GreeBo wrote: »
    FWIW I found that impossible!

    Yeah, it's very hard to do. But if/when you get there, you know you're running at a very relaxed cruisy pace that you can sustain for a long time. Even getting close to it should mean you're well within your easy running zone.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,208 ✭✭✭shotgunmcos


    If you can't sing a full verse of a song, you are not running easy enough


  • Registered Users Posts: 482 ✭✭Klopp


    When i started running at slower paces i found it very tough and was often getting frustrated, it took me a while to adjust but i now enjoy them. If you are not following any online plans then i would suggest breaking up your runs into different parts with different paces, forget about the distance and time, change your watch to only show the pace.


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  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Current pace on watches is not an accurate indicator. If you want to use pace should use lap pace.

    i.e.
    https://www.dcrainmaker.com/2011/03/art-of-pacing-with-garmin.html

    If you want to get accurate current pace you would need to get a Stryd.


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,121 ✭✭✭✭GreeBo


    Enduro wrote: »
    Yeah, it's very hard to do. But if/when you get there, you know you're running at a very relaxed cruisy pace that you can sustain for a long time. Even getting close to it should mean you're well within your easy running zone.

    I think part of my issue is that I have a slight cold and so breathing "hard" through my nose is an issue at the moment anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,849 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    Just for comparison, 5k in 24 minutes was roughly the pace I was training most days when I was a 2:55 marathon runner. While I don't know what level you are at, your pace is probably too fast.

    Do the talk test. For at least 80% of your runs you should be able to comfortably chat away to someone running next to you. If you're gasping for breath, you're running too fast.




    This is one of the oldest rules, we probably break it the most, but its the most important one to determine your easy pace!!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,831 ✭✭✭Annie get your Run


    Enduro wrote: »
    Here's an easy thing in theory.. hard to do in practice. run at the pace you can breathe through your nose.

    +1 to this, it's something I've only recently started doing, I don't look at the watch at all now, I just focus on breathing through my nose and running (jogging really) at a relaxed pace. If you forgot to bring a tissue, leaves are a very useful substitute!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,292 ✭✭✭ariana`


    +1 to this, it's something I've only recently started doing, I don't look at the watch at all now, I just focus on breathing through my nose and running (jogging really) at a relaxed pace. If you forgot to bring a tissue, leaves are a very useful substitute!

    The added bonus is you won't be at risk of swallowing midges if your mouth is closed ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 45 decolts


    I really appreciate all of the suggestions guys!

    Might try a few of these out to see which one helps.. I might start with the breathing thru the nose and be mindful of that - any time I have tried this previously I feel like I become more conscious of my breathing and makes me breathe faster! I will try it out on a couple of runs and see how it goes.

    I might also adjusting my displays to show info that would help me be more aware of my current pace.

    And last thing.. I have added a 10k workout on my watch with my desired pace, etc so will give that a go also..

    It seems I have a lot of experimenting to do with the different methods. Like many others, running has become my only real way of getting some exercise in so I want to be sure I'm continue to improve and the only way of doing that is to alter what I'm currently doing.

    Thanks again for all of the info!


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,849 ✭✭✭✭average_runner


    Enduro wrote: »
    Yeah, it's very hard to do. But if/when you get there, you know you're running at a very relaxed cruisy pace that you can sustain for a long time. Even getting close to it should mean you're well within your easy running zone.




    Its a great tip


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