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Advice Welcomed.

  • 21-04-2021 10:51pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,467 ✭✭✭ karlitob


    Hi all

    Unusual query. I’m looking for advice on how to fill up the space between the bottom of the concrete gravel board in my fence and the ground.

    I have a terrible and irreparable relationship with my neighbour. I installed a new concrete fence (45m) and wooden panel post last year - all legal, and all on my side. No part of the fence is on this wans land.

    But there are varying degrees of gaps between the bottom of the fence and the ground as the ground level changes a bit from from to back.

    I plan on putting either a block plantar along some parts of the fence and a granite kerb infilled with decorative stone for the remainder.

    She’s a lot of overgrown stuff on her side and I don’t want it coming up by the block planter or coming through the decorative stone.

    I also want the kerb or plantar to be my edge for my patio and sub base.

    I know this all sounds mad. But the whole thing is very very stressful. Whatever I do I can’t get into her side and I can’t let anything get into or onto her side.

    The notions that I have at the moment are:

    - dig down, put in a small concrete footing and do my best to block the space with soap bars, bricks on edge etx, mortar. I don’t mind doing that, the only issue I have is how to ensure that concrete doesn’t cross the boundary. Do I try and stick some ply down? Do I try to put some damp proof membrane underneath the concrete and position it in such a way as to hold it from going to her side.

    - dump a hole load of muck. This really isn’t as easy as it sounds as there’s been an issue about muck. If someone does suggest something - it can’t cross the boundary.


    Pic attached. I really would appreciate any comments or suggestions. Boundaries and neighbours, eh!!


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,467 ✭✭✭ karlitob


    Forgot pic


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,010 ✭✭✭ chooseusername


    Mark the fence posts where the bottom of the gravel board is.
    Lift out the fence panels and gravel boards (you'll need someone with you)
    Dig out enough between the posts to take a second gravel board
    so top of new gravel board comes to the mark on the post.
    Make sure new gravel board is on solid ground, otherwise a few shovels
    of concrete under the gravel board to keep it level.
    Replace original gravel board and panel.
    That will also get rid of the unsightly supports.

    Edited to add;
    I just remembered this fence of yours from last year, you did a grand job,
    but the finish at the base lets it down a bit.
    I realise now that the concrete for the posts will make method above difficult.
    It will mean having to break out some the concrete or cut the gravel boards at the bottom corners.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,467 ✭✭✭ karlitob


    Mark the fence posts where the bottom of the gravel board is.
    Lift out the fence panels and gravel boards (you'll need someone with you)
    Dig out enough between the posts to take a second gravel board
    so top of new gravel board comes to the mark on the post.
    Make sure new gravel board is on solid ground, otherwise a few shovels
    of concrete under the gravel board to keep it level.
    Replace original gravel board and panel.
    That will also get rid of the unsightly supports.

    Edited to add;
    I just remembered this fence of yours from last year, you did a grand job,
    but the finish at the base lets it down a bit.
    I realise now that the concrete for the posts will make method above difficult.
    It will mean having to break out some the concrete or cut the gravel boards at the bottom corners.

    Haha - well remember. Yes - I’m back this season for more work. I think I used up all the free advice last year on fence so I left it for a bit. And thanks for your time on this.

    You’re right about the base - I had thought of that but at the time advised against it by a few people. And as you noted, now I’d have to break the concrete to do as you suggest, which isn’t feasible. Besides, the hassle of removing all the fence panels and posts with your wan next door I think makes that suggestion a no-go. I can feel my blood pressure rise just thinking about it.

    Any other ideas?


  • Registered Users Posts: 799 ✭✭✭ mr.stonewall


    What about getting a few of the bottom concrete panels and letting the rest up against the concrete posts, backfill with clay on your side and put a planter in. Clay will hold it in place. Other option is to cast a concrete barge under the bottom panel

    Maybe put down the weed control fabric and let it up the side of your fence, before back filling. Trim when done. Will also help to keep fence clean while filling


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,971 ✭✭✭✭ Calahonda52


    I see this as a two step project.
    You need to get shut of the supports.
    I would get a pair of bottle jacks or car jacks and using timber to stop any chipping, just take the weight of the concrete panel and remove the blocks etc and replace with piece of solid steel cut to length that will fit in the recess, with maybe a small rubber pad to spread the load top and bottom
    You could use short pieces of timber either, soaked in protim and if it was say 6 by 2, you could then screw more timber to them, cut to size to take care of the different depths


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,010 ✭✭✭ chooseusername


    Ok hows about;
    shuttering against the posts on neighbours side to come above the bottoms
    of the gravel boards, blocks and rocks will keep it in place.
    Same on your side but a few of inches below the bottom of the gravel boards,
    (You'll need space to fill the shuttering)
    Fill with a fairly dry stiff mix of concrete and packed tight under gravel boards.
    Stop short of your supports , you'll need to knock these out later.
    Leave to set a couple of days, take down shutters on your side
    knock out your supports and fill these gaps with dryish mix of concrete.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,666 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    Ok hows about;
    shuttering against the posts on neighbours side to come above the bottoms
    of the gravel boards, blocks and rocks will keep it in place.
    Same on your side but a few of inches below the bottom of the gravel boards,
    (You'll need space to fill the shuttering)
    Fill with a fairly dry stiff mix of concrete and packed tight under gravel boards.
    Stop short of your supports , you'll need to knock these out later.
    Leave to set a couple of days, take down shutters on your side
    knock out your supports and fill these gaps with dryish mix of concrete.

    He can't go anywhere near the neighbours side so how would he get the shuttering in there.

    I'd just screw in some mild steel into the gravel boards slightly buried and put top soil up against it then plant all long . Simple be done with it and can't see anything


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,010 ✭✭✭ chooseusername


    listermint wrote: »
    He can't go anywhere near the neighbours side so how would he get the shuttering in there.

    I'd just screw in some mild steel into the gravel boards slightly buried and put top soil up against it then plant all long . Simple be done with it and can't see anything
    Didn't realise 'twas that bad.
    Knock out supports, drop gravel boards and panels down the 6 or 8 ins
    trellis on top to top of posts


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,467 ✭✭✭ karlitob


    listermint wrote: »
    He can't go anywhere near the neighbours side so how would he get the shuttering in there.

    I'd just screw in some mild steel into the gravel boards slightly buried and put top soil up against it then plant all long . Simple be done with it and can't see anything

    That sounds like a promising idea, thank you.

    That would allow me to cut to size and accommodate different gaps. It would fill and block nearly all of the gaps. And allow me to build up against it or plant up against it.



    Would it be this sort of thing you were thinking? Am I on the right track?

    44m - should keep me going for a while.

    https://iitc.ie/catalogue/steel/steel-plate/mild-steel-plate/mild-steel-plate/


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,467 ✭✭✭ karlitob


    karlitob wrote: »

    Would it be this sort of thing you were thinking? Am I on the right track?

    https://iitc.ie/catalogue/steel/steel-plate/mild-steel-plate/mild-steel-plate/

    Would a Perspex work as well considering the volume I have to do?

    Thank you

    https://365plastics.ie/2mm-acrylic-perspex-sheet-clear-1000mm-x-1000mm.html


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,467 ✭✭✭ karlitob


    Two pics

    - one with a concrete panel hanging around. Could trim to size (avoid the support blocks) and bury hard up against the current panels. It’s cheap and no real loss of space.

    - one with a bit of metal. Easier to cut, easier to bury, I’m sure I could secure into concrete. But I imagine it would be a whole lot more expensive.


    Anyway - thought I put it up for comments. Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,467 ✭✭✭ karlitob


    Two pics

    - one with a concrete panel hanging around. Could trim to size (avoid the support blocks) and bury hard up against the current panels. It’s cheap and no real loss of space.

    - one with a bit of metal. Easier to cut, easier to bury, I’m sure I could secure into concrete. But I imagine it would be a whole lot more expensive.


    Anyway - thought I put it up for comments. Thanks.


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