We have updated our Privacy Notice, you can read the updated document here
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

Forestry Objection

  • #2
    Registered Users Posts: 62 ✭✭✭ carbuyer01


    Hello,


    We're currently building a new property and i noticed over the weekend across the road a forestry application was in there, this application was received last summer some time.

    As the last thing i want is a green wall in front of me in years to come, where or how do i go about making an objection to this. I'm not one for this kinda lark but i do feel that it would totally devalue the property as well as our enjoyment.


    I've checked and the decision on planning is still "pending"


    Any help here would be much appreciated


    Thanks


Comments

  • #2


    carbuyer01 wrote: »
    Hello,


    We're currently building a new property and i noticed over the weekend across the road a forestry application was in there, this application was received last summer some time.

    As the last thing i want is a green wall in front of me in years to come, where or how do i go about making an objection to this. I'm not one for this kinda lark but i do feel that it would totally devalue the property as well as our enjoyment.


    I've checked and the decision on planning is still "pending"


    Any help here would be much appreciated


    Thanks

    They have a right to the enjoyment of their private property too.

    If you choose to live in the country you must accept country living.

    The council may have a planning application over a certain size, otherwise their is no objecting.


  • #2


    carbuyer01 wrote: »
    Hello,


    We're currently building a new property and i noticed over the weekend across the road a forestry application was in there, this application was received last summer some time.

    As the last thing i want is a green wall in front of me in years to come, where or how do i go about making an objection to this. I'm not one for this kinda lark but i do feel that it would totally devalue the property as well as our enjoyment.


    I've checked and the decision on planning is still "pending"


    Any help here would be much appreciated


    Thanks


    I rang the forestry dept, as my neighbour wanted to plant trees at the back of my house which would over time have obliterated my beautiful view.

    They told me an application would have to have a mixture of deciduous and evergreen trees.
    They would also have to have a certain % of eco area ( wild plants and flowers).
    Also they can't plant trees closer than 60m from your dwelling (not boundary). They could plant to 30m put they would need your written consent.

    You can request a copy of the application from the department. You can lodge an observation without giving your name but it would need to be received within a certain time limit.

    Hope this is some help.


  • #2


    If the application was last summer wouldn't the time to object be up


  • #2


    If the application was last summer wouldn't the time to object be up

    Seems a bit mad that the decision has been made before now.


  • #2


    Seems a bit mad that the decision has been made before now.

    How long does a decision like that usually take


  • #2


    I don't know tbh it should be on the forestry website, housecplanning takes 8 weeks.


  • #2


    If you are serious take professional advice.


  • #2


    99nsr125 wrote: »
    They have a right to the enjoyment of their private property too.

    If you choose to live in the country you must accept country living.

    The council may have a planning application over a certain size, otherwise their is no objecting.

    That's not the point, the logic behind being able to object is that if the council think your objection is valid they'll take it on board, I could object to what I want it doesn't mean that it'll be taken seriously, this "country living " bs is trotted out by people who usually don't rightly know what they don't like about something or someone but want to make an argument anyway


  • #2


    Who doesn't like a forest, will take many many years to grow. It will grow on you


  • #2


    Who doesn't like a forest, will take many many years to grow. It will grow on you

    It depends - there is a world of difference between a grim dark monoculture of alien spruce and a diverse native woodland


  • #2


    That's not the point, the logic behind being able to object is that if the council think your objection is valid they'll take it on board, I could object to what I want it doesn't mean that it'll be taken seriously, this "country living " bs is trotted out by people who usually don't rightly know what they don't like about something or someone but want to make an argument anyway

    Country living means tractors, combines running all night, slurry spreading, piggeries, horses and forests.

    The forest is the quietest, cleanest and best scented. If you don't like it you're going to have a hard time.


  • #2


    99nsr125 wrote: »
    Country living means tractors, combines running all night, slurry spreading, piggeries, horses and forests.

    The forest is the quietest, cleanest and best scented. If you don't like it you're going to have a hard time.

    I never said I didn't like it, I'm just pointing out the how the system works, it's got nothing to do with liking or not liking something


  • #2


    Would you not approach the landowner first?
    If you're moving to the area, and assuming the landowner lives locally, ye will be neighbours soon enough.

    I put in an application for some forestry, I dont know if I will go ahead or not. But if one of the neighbours objected without talking to me I'd probably be a bit pissed off...


  • #2


    Why would you come into an area which effectively where someone makes their living and tell them what they can and cannot do? Do you expect your feet to be encased in concrete such that you will have to face "a green wall" ? As for property devaluation, it cuts both ways. I'd hope the landowner would make your life hell and object to your proposed home.

    Sauce for the goose, etc.


  • #2


    Why would you come into an area which effectively where someone makes their living and tell them what they can and cannot do? Do you expect your feet to be encased in concrete such that you will have to face "a green wall" ? As for property devaluation, it cuts both ways. I'd hope the landowner would make your life hell and object to your proposed home.

    Sauce for the goose, etc.

    Jesus biddy you'd want to calm down a bit


  • #2


    Jesus buddy you'd want to calm down a bit


    Really? Do yo have any idea of what it is like to have people come into an area and begin critiquing what you do?



    A case in point was a well-heeled Dubliner living in a rural area, who organised local protests against a farmer who was considering leasing a hill to a telecommunications company. It was a half mile from this objector's house, but would be visible from the front windows. This individual "researched" online the supposed effects of radiation from such masts on cattle production, duly presented their findings to the landowner and a couple of weeks later he withdrew the application. This objector glowed in the belief that their research had shown the poor farmer that he would lose X% in profit and that he had been educated as to his folly.

    What they did not know was that a couple of other landowners harassed, hounded and intimidated the guy by interfering with his livestock and farming activities. However, this person was the instigator of the objections.
    Not long after, this objector bid farewell to the peasants and went back to the rarefied air of South Dublin.
    Crap like this happens like this all over the countryside. Now I have no issue with people coming to live in the countryside and the benefits from new DNA to different ways of seeing and doing things are great. But the expression "ar scath a chelie a mhaireann na daoine" should be borne in mind.


  • #2


    Really? Do yo have any idea of what it is like to have people come into an area and begin critiquing what you do?



    A case in point was a well-heeled Dubliner living in a rural area, who organised local protests against a farmer who was considering leasing a hill to a telecommunications company. It was a half mile from this objector's house, but would be visible from the front windows. This individual "researched" online the supposed effects of radiation from such masts on cattle production, duly presented their findings to the landowner and a couple of weeks later he withdrew the application. This objector glowed in the belief that their research had shown the poor farmer that he would lose X% in profit and that he had been educated as to his folly.

    What they did not know was that a couple of other landowners harassed, hounded and intimidated the guy by interfering with his livestock and farming activities. However, this person was the instigator of the objections.
    Not long after, this objector bid farewell to the peasants and went back to the rarefied air of South Dublin.
    Crap like this happens like this all over the countryside. Now I have no issue with people coming to live in the countryside and the benefits from new DNA to different ways of seeing and doing things are great. But the expression "ar scath a chelie a mhaireann na daoine" should be borne in mind.

    I doubt that happened, why would other locals be so easily swayed by a blow in from Dublin


  • #2


    I doubt that happened, why would other locals be so easily swayed by a blow in from Dublin


    I have no words guy.....


Society & Culture