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Metal studding vs timber studding

  • 09-04-2021 8:46am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 220 ✭✭ kevcos


    Howdy all,
    I'm interested to hear opinions on the pro's & con's of metal vs timber studding used in single residential houses.

    I find maintaining quality using timber studding can be a struggle for a number reasons; timber itself can be of inconsistent quality, 1st fix carpenters who can install timber to a fine tolerance are hard to find (for example where shadow gap details are required).

    I thinking that perhaps better quality may be easier to achieve by using metal C or I channel studding (perhaps lined with a 18mm ply) and I'm wondering what the downside in using metal might be?


Comments

  • Subscribers Posts: 36,629 ✭✭✭✭ sydthebeat


    mainly cost


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,991 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    kevcos wrote: »
    Howdy all,
    I'm interested to hear opinions on the pro's & con's of metal vs timber studding used in single residential houses.

    I find maintaining quality using timber studding can be a struggle for a number reasons; timber itself can be of inconsistent quality, 1st fix carpenters who can install timber to a fine tolerance are hard to find (for example where shadow gap details are required).

    I thinking that perhaps better quality may be easier to achieve by using metal C or I channel studding (perhaps lined with a 18mm ply) and I'm wondering what the downside in using metal might be?

    No real difference from a technical point of view in my experience.
    You''ll have some requirements such as flat straps etc if constructing 30 minute Fire Rated construction etc

    But with the metal stud, you also have to follow the manufacturers guidelines carefully, especially where cables run through them, bends and cuts of the flanges as raw edges can penetrate wiring etc

    Maintaining quality will be the same as timber stud IMO.


  • Administrators Posts: 49,893 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ awec


    Our house has a mixture of timber and metal and the metal stud walls are a pain to hang things on compared to the timber studs.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,991 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    awec wrote: »
    Our house has a mixture of timber and metal and the metal stud walls are a pain to hang things on compared to the timber studs.

    How so?
    It’s the same plasterboard your fixing to?
    Unless your trying to drill into the studs? In which case you need specific metal fixings.


  • Administrators Posts: 49,893 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ awec


    Gumbo wrote: »
    How so?
    It’s the same plasterboard your fixing to?
    Unless your trying to drill into the studs? In which case you need specific metal fixings.

    Yes, when you are hanging anything that needs the strength of the studs.

    Drilling and fixing to metal is more work.


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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 31,991 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Gumbo


    awec wrote: »
    Yes, when you are hanging anything that needs the strength of the studs.

    Drilling and fixing to metal is more work.

    Agh yeah I can see that now.
    You don’t get the “bite’ of drilling into a timber stud as such.


  • Administrators Posts: 49,893 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ awec


    Gumbo wrote: »
    Agh yeah I can see that now.
    You don’t get the “bite’ of drilling into a timber stud as such.

    Well there is that, yea.

    But if you want to fix something to a timber stud you just get a screw and drive it in. Job done.

    For metal you need to drill a hole (more difficult), then find a fixing that's suitable for securing to metal. You can get self-drilling screws for metal but my experience with them is very mixed.


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