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Stock refurbishment.

  • 28-03-2021 3:04pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Got him!


    Anyone ever use Birchwood Casey stock refurb kit? Thinking of doing a job on a stock that got slightly stained after leaving a leather recoil pad on it while in the safe.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Tru-oil ? Its ok, but you'd get the same results with Danish oil from woodies.


  • Registered Users Posts: 436 ✭✭ JP22


    Got him! wrote: »
    Anyone ever use Birchwood Casey stock refurb kit? Thinking of doing a job on a stock that got slightly stained after leaving a leather recoil pad on it while in the safe.

    Any of the common oil finishes available are ok, some are better than others.

    The real key is preparation before applying the finish. Once stock is stripped small dents/scratches can be steamed out. Wet sanding will create a slurry which will fill any pores.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    JP22 wrote: »
    Any of the common oil finishes available are ok, some are better than others.

    The real key is preparation before applying the finish. Once stock is stripped small dents/scratches can be steamed out. Wet sanding will create a slurry which will fill any pores.


    Yes, very important, seperates the amateur looking job from the professional one. Another tip, is not to be in a hurry, applying a finish is not something to be done in a few hours, take your time with it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 310 ✭✭ no_4


    I’ve used this Kit on my beretta x trap, it has grade 3 wood so was nervous going at it, but it did a nice job, brings out the grain lovely
    comes with three bottles for stocks at different stages of prep and several grades paper and good instruction s
    As last poster says it’s not a job to be rushed, build up 5-6 light layers with plenty drying time in between each


    quote="Got him!;116720469"]Anyone ever use Birchwood Casey stock refurb kit? Thinking of doing a job on a stock that got slightly stained after leaving a leather recoil pad on it while in the safe.[/quote]


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,679 ✭✭✭ Bogwoppit


    I did my own stock a few years ago with boiled linseed oil.
    Prep is the key, I followed a guide online but can’t remember where I found it.
    I ended up with about 25 coats all rubbed in using bare fingers to get heat into the oil and then let sit for 24 hours between coats and then polished each time.
    Sounds a lot harder than it was, 5 minutes every evening for a month, a perfect lockdown project.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,569 ✭✭✭ garv123


    Look up slippery dicks on facebook or their website.

    Very easy to use. I did 2 shotguns with it last year. He has plenty videos showing how to use it.

    https://www.slipperydicksgunwax.co.uk/

    All you need to use to strip back the original finish is steel wool and nail varnish remover.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    Stick up a picture and ill tell you what i would do to it. I've refinished hundreds of high-end bespoke firearms.


  • Registered Users Posts: 441 ✭✭ jb88


    When you dont like it and cant get what you want send it to Pat Sludds for a professional finish


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Got him!


    juice1304 wrote: »
    Stick up a picture and ill tell you what i would do to it. I've refinished hundreds of high-end bespoke firearms.

    See attached. Sorry for the late reply.🥴


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    Got him! wrote: »
    See attached. Sorry for the late reply.��

    It's not too bad.
    First thing to do is to try and steam out as many dents and scratches as much as is possible.
    Then start sanding with emery paper with a rigid block. You don't ever want to go over the checkering nor metal but I always sand with the metal on as the one thing that will make it really look like an amateur job is if you sand below the metal. I would also sand over the buttcap.
    The way I sand is as follows.
    180p for heavy stuff until all the dings and scratches are gone.
    Then you raise the grain. You do this by taking a damp sponge and wetting the stock. Then hit it with a heat gun or hair dryer to dry it.
    Then move on to 240p
    and again raise the grain,
    Then 320p
    raise the grain,
    400p
    and then I use FFFF pumice to get rid of any micro-scratches left by sanding.
    Then you can start applying oil.
    Use red oil to color the wood not stain. Schaftol sells various shades of it I use Dunkel most of the time. You will have to give it a few coats over a number of days rubbing it in with your hand until your hand starts becoming warm the friction will make it absorb into the stock. Once its at the colour you want you can then start applying a finishing oil. Which is a hard oil. And again it takes several days or weeks to finish it.

    I hope this helps you anyway. Its fairly simple and only takes a few hours to complete. Probably 6 hours for your first one.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    juice1304 wrote: »
    It's not too bad.
    First thing to do is to try and steam out as many dents and scratches as much as is possible.
    Then start sanding with emery paper with a rigid block. You don't ever want to go over the checkering nor metal but I always sand with the metal on as the one thing that will make it really look like an amateur job is if you sand below the metal. I would also sand over the buttcap.
    The way I sand is as follows.
    180p for heavy stuff until all the dings and scratches are gone.
    Then you raise the grain. You do this by taking a damp sponge and wetting the stock. Then hit it with a heat gun or hair dryer to dry it.
    Then move on to 240p
    and again raise the grain,
    Then 320p
    raise the grain,
    400p
    and then I use FFFF pumice to get rid of any micro-scratches left by sanding.
    Then you can start applying oil.
    Use red oil to color the wood not stain. Schaftol sells various shades of it I use Dunkel most of the time. You will have to give it a few coats over a number of days rubbing it in with your hand until your hand starts becoming warm the friction will make it absorb into the stock. Once its at the colour you want you can then start applying a finishing oil. Which is a hard oil. And again it takes several days or weeks to finish it.

    I hope this helps you anyway. Its fairly simple and only takes a few hours to complete. Probably 6 hours for your first one.

    You can make your own red oil, its easy enough but time consuming. You can buy alkanet root off ebay or craft stores, people use it for colouring soap. I put a pound of it into a tupperware jar and poured a pint of boiled linseed oil in too. Even after a few weeks the oil is red, the longer you leave it the better. Its what gives a stock the right colour.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,805 ✭✭✭ juice1304


    tudderone wrote: »
    You can make your own red oil, its easy enough but time consuming. You can buy alkanet root off ebay or craft stores, people use it for colouring soap. I put a pound of it into a tupperware jar and poured a pint of boiled linseed oil in too. Even after a few weeks the oil is red, the longer you leave it the better. Its what gives a stock the right colour.

    Yes i have made it before its just easier for him to buy it though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    juice1304 wrote: »
    Yes i have made it before its just easier for him to buy it though.

    I like making/doing what i can, its all part of the fun.


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Got him!


    Thanks for all that! Plenty to ponder there. I have a birchwood casey kit but was reluctant to use it as I really don't know much about it. There is a wallnut stain in the kit. Would you recommend not actually using it? I like oiled finishes and have a Beretta 687 EELL & a SP 3 which get an odd coat of Boiled Linseed Oil. They come up lovely. I don't really know what the TRU OIL finish would be like. Certainly won't get near my Berettas. I might pass on the Birchwood Casey kit altogether. One way or another I don't want to make a balls of the stock !!


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Got him! wrote: »
    Thanks for all that! Plenty to ponder there. I have a birchwood casey kit but was reluctant to use it as I really don't know much about it. There is a wallnut stain in the kit. Would you recommend not actually using it? I like oiled finishes and have a Beretta 687 EELL & a SP 3 which get an odd coat of Boiled Linseed Oil. They come up lovely. I don't really know what the TRU OIL finish would be like. Certainly won't get near my Berettas. I might pass on the Birchwood Casey kit altogether. One way or another I don't want to make a balls of the stock !!

    Tru-oil is a polymerised oil, its a varnish/oil mix. Beretta use it on all their guns so its not rubbish.


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Got him!


    I don't mean to be asking dumb questions but I assume I can use Boiled Linseed oil to finish after using red oil to achieve the desired colour ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    Got him! wrote: »
    I don't mean to be asking dumb questions but I assume I can use Boiled Linseed oil to finish after using red oil to achieve the desired colour ?

    Yes, when you have the colour you require, you start putting on the finish oil. Boiled linseed oil can be awfully slow to dry though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 310 ✭✭ no_4


    Spot on tudderone. Linseed on its own takes twice as long to dry, at least. Truoil has additives that evaporate faster

    tudderone wrote: »
    Yes, when you have the colour you require, you start putting on the finish oil. Boiled linseed oil can be awfully slow to dry though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,280 ✭✭✭ tudderone


    This cropped up in my subscriptions earlier. Might be helpful.





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