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Irish coinage 1940s

  • 23-03-2021 11:50am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 18 ✭✭✭ Cashmenson


    Hey

    I am wondering does anyone know what the name of the coins were that circulated in the 1940s and their worth.? I found half crown shilling sixpence florin?

    What are their worth? Like on average how much would one spend on a loaf of bread, or tea, sugar, sweets?

    I find it all abit confusing.

    Thanks


Comments

  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 6,364 Mod ✭✭✭✭ pinkypinky


    Genealogy Forum Mod



  • Registered Users Posts: 18 ✭✭✭ Cashmenson


    pinkypinky wrote: »

    Thanks a mill


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,150 ✭✭✭ Yellow_Fern


    Cashmenson wrote: »
    Hey

    I am wondering does anyone know what the name of the coins were that circulated in the 1940s and their worth.? I found half crown shilling sixpence florin?

    What are their worth? Like on average how much would one spend on a loaf of bread, or tea, sugar, sweets?

    I find it all abit confusing.

    Thanks

    You might get some of this on the CSO website


  • Registered Users Posts: 164 ✭✭ Conqueror


    Cashmenson wrote: »
    What are their worth? Like on average how much would one spend on a loaf of bread, or tea, sugar, sweets?

    I find it all abit confusing.

    Thanks

    It's worth remembering that, during the 1940s, a lot of items were rationed because of World War II. Even if you had a fortune, you couldn't just buy plenty of sugar or tea.

    According to the CSO, the average wage increased from €2.85 (£2 4/11) a week in 1939 to €5.61 (£4 8/2) in 1949.

    Page 73 of the attached will help you understand the value of some products in 1949, compared with 1983 and 1999. Just to note, the prices of 1949 are in equivalent decimal pence, so the 2p for a pound of sugar is actually about 5 pre-decimal pence.

    Page 155 of this PhD thesis gives a graph of the cost of eight foodstuffs between 1938 and 1948.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18 ✭✭✭ Cashmenson


    Conqueror wrote: »
    It's worth remembering that, during the 1940s, a lot of items were rationed because of World War II. Even if you had a fortune, you couldn't just buy plenty of sugar or tea.

    According to the CSO, the average wage increased from €2.85 (£2 4/11) a week in 1939 to €5.61 (£4 8/2) in 1949.

    Page 73 of the attached will help you understand the value of some products in 1949, compared with 1983 and 1999. Just to note, the prices of 1949 are in equivalent decimal pence, so the 2p for a pound of sugar is actually about 5 pre-decimal pence.

    Page 155 of this PhD thesis gives a graph of the cost of eight foodstuffs between 1938 and 1948.

    Fantastic. Thanks so much for the info. Greatly appreciated


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,188 ✭✭✭ rock22


    A bit outside your time period but I remember that a loaf of bread was less than a shilling in 59 - 61. I think between 10d and 11 1/2d .
    I remember helping on a bread van and it was unusual for a weekly bill to come to 10s. That was the smallest note and i remember being impressed by some customers paying with a note rather than coins.


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