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Self Build - Yah or Nah to Vaulted ceilings

  • 13-03-2021 6:25pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1 jmcard2021


    Hi All

    I'm currently in the design stage of my self-build house working with my architect. I want vaulted ceilings but being advised by others not to get them due to the cost of building them and the additional costs of heating the extra air space. the vaulted ceilings would be over the open plan living dining kitchen area. as I'm trying to keep the house to 140m2 if possible.

    what are everyone's thoughts on the vaulted ceilings ? are they worth the additional costs?

    vaulted Ceilings 24 votes

    Yes get the vaulted ceiling always worth the cost.
    58% 14 votes
    No Vaulted ceilings are too expensive to build and heat, not worth the cost.
    41% 10 votes


Comments

  • Subscribers Posts: 36,239 ✭✭✭✭ sydthebeat


    100% once the space is properly designed and proportioned for them.

    The 'extra space to heat' is a compete non argument and whoever said that to you has simply no idea about modern building.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,530 ✭✭✭ Dudda


    After watching Dermot Bannon, Grand Designs, DIY sos or any other build program people consider themselves experts with an opinion. In new houses the heating element of a double height space is not an issue. Completely ignore anyone who says heating is an issue. Old houses sure.

    As for cost people put in expensive kitchens and bathrooms which are ripped out and replaced after a few years. You can't go back and add the vaulted ceilings so do them now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,926 ✭✭✭✭ Calahonda52


    I would go vaulted, will be back later with the spec


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,851 ✭✭✭ beggars_bush


    Especially in master bedroom and living area


  • Registered Users Posts: 709 ✭✭✭ lashes34


    We have vaulted ceilings in our house, living room and bedrooms upstairs. If it's what you like then do it. We have geothermal heating and the place is roasting. Zero issues heating it


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  • Registered Users Posts: 454 ✭✭ com1


    sydthebeat wrote: »
    100% once the space is properly designed and proportioned for them.

    The 'extra space to heat' is a compete non argument and whoever said that to you has simply no idea about modern building.

    I would agree... retro fitting vaulted ceilings would be a nightmare. Just be sure whoever installs your heating takes it into account in their calculations...

    I have a vaulted living / dining room built off the kitchen and am convinced the plumber calculated the btu wrong. Just could not get the area to the right temp, it is just off... though a fairly easy fix as we have rads... replaced with higher btu rad and spot on...


  • Registered Users Posts: 140 ✭✭ arsebiscuits82


    We have a vaulted ceiling in our main kitchen/dining/living room and love it. No regrets.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,325 ✭✭✭✭ fits


    With modern building standards it’s not an issue for heating. If you want them don’t let that stop you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,510 ✭✭✭✭ Lumen


    The "space heating" argument is invalid but a vaulted ceiling does have a larger surface area than a flat ceiling so requires better insulation to achieve the same performance, right?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,654 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    Lumen wrote: »
    The "space heating" argument is invalid but a vaulted ceiling does have a larger surface area than a flat ceiling so requires better insulation to achieve the same performance, right?

    And painting and changing a simple lightbulb.

    There are some drawbacks it's not all rosey for balance . Personally I'd put that money into outsider space or the ability to enjoy a direct to kitchen outdoor space all year round. I'd enjoy that more for the money.

    There's a raft of vaulted architect inspired new builds all over the country with flat green gardens and a **** box patio beside them . No money left for landscaping or outside architecture


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,753 ✭✭✭ phormium


    I don't have a new house for starters so won't address the heating issue, my vaulted ceiling is in a sunroom so only really used from now on until October-ish as it definitely doesn't have the heat to enable it be used year round, don't think that's because of the ceiling either but anyway....

    I love the look of them but as mentioned changing light bulbs is a nightmare hence I have several blown downlighters for years, maybe don't put those, a hanging down light might be easier! Secondly and this might be just me as I open the doors of sunroom in summer but as many houses now have those big slider doors then maybe they will be open too I absolutely hate the flies! They come in and can't get out as head for the highest point so buzz around the top of the ceiling until they literally die and drop to the floor dead, they never find a way out and it makes me slow to open doors/windows in fine weather. Now if you have the ceiling in a place where windows/doors won't be opened then not a problem!

    And finally I don't like the sound if in a place where there are hard surfaces, mightn't bother everyone but if tiled floor, sparse curtains/blinds, kitchen etc may be echo-ey. I have carpet of all things in my sunroom but I like carpet but know that when it wasn't there for years I didn't like the sound effects.


    So they are lovely to look at but take into account the downsides if any of them bother you :) I'd still probably do it again but definitely wouldn't go for the lighting I have.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,325 ✭✭✭✭ fits


    Our main bedroom has vaulted ceiling ( lost our attic due to height limit so have high ceilings instead.). We have wall lights in it but agree flies getting up there is a pain!


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,136 ✭✭✭ JoeA3


    We have double height ceilings in our kitchen / dining area with a glass-walled “mezzanine” (which has become a nice home-office) overlooking it.

    We love it, it makes the house feel a little different. There is a great feeling of light and space and general airy ness. There is zero issue with heating it. It’s probably the warmest part of the house due to it being south / south west facing with double-height glazing. We’ve very good insulation and we got a very good airtightness result, so no issue with heating or heat retention.

    The obvious drawbacks - getting up there. I have an LED strip in the ceiling that stopped working after a few months and I haven’t got up to look at it yet. I plan to invest in a mini tower aluminium scaffold when I have a few spare pennies, as I’ll definitely need to get up there occasionally.

    It also added complexity and of course extra cost to the build. Most of the trades had no issue at all but the sparks moaned a bit about it as he had more awkward cable runs and wall chasing to do than typical. You’re also building a lot of walls / height for relatively small usable floor space. Some might argue when they see my house that I could have put another bedroom or 2 up there. But personally I feel it’s worth it, wasn’t interested in more bedrooms !!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,587 ✭✭✭ Goldengirl


    Have vaulted ceilings in our kitchen dining room space .
    We have veluxes where the flies and wasps go , so I just tilt the window and out they fly .
    Also have pendants in vaulted area.

    One part that I would do better is insulation although they were insulated well to standard at the time of building .
    Feels colder and draughtier in there when not cooking than in the rest of the house which has better insulation .
    We have been talking about getting it redone but stopped short of "doing ", at the moment .
    We use the room and adjoining open plan living area all the time so it will be difficult to get the ideal time to do it .

    I would imagine with today's standards of insulation and airtightness enforced in the build it would be lovely .


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,926 ✭✭✭✭ Calahonda52


    Vaulted will reduce the BER due to a smaller floor area.
    Vaulted should have high density insulation to reduce solar over hating in summer: decrement delay.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,587 ✭✭✭ Goldengirl


    Vaulted will reduce the BER due to a smaller floor area.
    Vaulted should have high density insulation to reduce solar over hating in summer: decrement delay.

    Ok to do this if building new , harder to retrofit .


  • Registered Users Posts: 22 ✭✭✭ Woodie.ie


    You can have a vaulted ceiling without going all the way up to the apex, we did one where the ceiling was raised 300-400mm above the wallplate it gives a great effect and no need for velux rooflights.


  • Registered Users Posts: 613 ✭✭✭ houseyhouse


    What would the cost of vaulting an existing ceiling in the upstairs of a semi-d be? Our attic pitch is too low to get useable space up there but I would love to use that space get high ceilings in some of the bedrooms. It’s a standard 70s construction with W-shaped truss roof.



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