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Self repair

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  • 24-02-2021 2:20pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭


    Hi Folks, looking for a bit of advice.

    I was doing a clearout and came across a watch i wore a few years ago, it stopped working around 6/7 years ago on holidays after swimming and the inside all fogged up. I assume the internals may be rusted at this stage.

    Would it be as simple as getting a new movement and swapping the face and hands ? And if so, could someone point me in the direction of what new movement (I may be using that term incorrectly, basically everything inside the case other than hands and face)

    I came across this. Wound i be on the right track ?

    Tissot PR50 Titanium.

    Thanks.

    PXL-20210224-131354843.jpg


Comments

  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,633 Mod ✭✭✭✭blue5000


    Can you get the back off and post a photo of the movement?

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    PXL-20210224-133928153.jpg

    It doesn't seem to look too bad, maybe its just the battery...


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 60,108 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wibbs


    I'd swap out the battery first just to see if that's all it needs.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    Cheers Wibbs, batteries ordered, here Monday hopefully.

    Ill check it in a while with a meter for pig iron, i dont have one to swap.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    Getting .22v, think it needs 1.5.

    That will be an easy result, will let ye know when replacement battery arrives.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,248 ✭✭✭✭Cienciano


    The awkward thing is taking the hands off and putting them back on again. A few cheap specialized tools make it a lot easier.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    If i go down the road of having to replace the movement ill get some tools also, any you recommend ?

    This appears to be the movement in case i need it.

    Amazing what a quick google and youtube can do !

    I am surprised the glass is in such good condition.

    PXL-20210224-142553545.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,709 ✭✭✭Lorddrakul


    +1 for the info here.

    The first movement swap I did was an absolute b*ll ache with the hands. If you are going to attempt it, get a cheap hand pusher set online. It doesn't make it an easy job, but it does make it much easier than faffing about with cocktail sticks and the like.

    Also, the putty that can be used to pick up things like hands, instead of using tweezers, is well worth it.

    I got a decent set of general watch tools, including a hand puller, online from the UK for about €25. Use them all the time but mostly for things like battery changes, back removal for regulation and bracelet/strap adjustment or swaps.

    They have paid for themselves by the second battery change.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    Lorddrakul wrote: »
    +1 for the info here.

    The first movement swap I did was an absolute b*ll ache with the hands. If you are going to attempt it, get a cheap hand pusher set online. It doesn't make it an easy job, but it does make it much easier than faffing about with cocktail sticks and the like.

    Also, the putty that can be used to pick up things like hands, instead of using tweezers, is well worth it.

    I got a decent set of general watch tools, including a hand puller, online from the UK for about €25. Use them all the time but mostly for things like battery changes, back removal for regulation and bracelet/strap adjustment or swaps.

    They have paid for themselves by the second battery change.

    Thanks for that.

    Something like this maybe ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,709 ✭✭✭Lorddrakul


    oleras wrote: »
    Thanks for that.

    Something like this maybe ?

    That is the very one!

    To which I added this:

    5e0aeb836473916fe60f8d69-large.jpg?cache_buster=a466aee5817dde79693092137c84fb8b


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    New battery fitted and still not running. I will get a replacement movement.

    Thinking i will get someone else to swap the face and hands over, afraid i would feck it up. Would a jeweler/watch repair do this if i supplied the movement or would they rather do everything ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,709 ✭✭✭Lorddrakul


    Yeah, most places that would do watch repairs should easily be able to do a quartz movement swap, when supplied with the bits.
    they might have to order new seals and gaskets, but it shouldn't be a problem.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,684 ✭✭✭david


    Did you clean the battery contacts for corrosion/leak damage?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    david wrote: »
    Did you clean the battery contacts for corrosion/leak damage?

    I wouldn't know how tbh. Had a look with just my eyes and nothing looked corroded, all shiny.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,709 ✭✭✭Lorddrakul


    A cotton bud, or similar, with a bit of cleaning alcohol, or nail varnish remover is usually pretty good to clean contacts.

    If they looked clean and shiny, chances are you are good, but it is always a good idea when changing a battery.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 60,108 Mod ✭✭✭✭Wibbs


    Alcohol is a good plan L, nail polish remover not so much. It's acetone and if any of that gets near the circuit board bits or the coil it'll almost certainly kill them.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,709 ✭✭✭Lorddrakul


    Wibbs wrote: »
    Alcohol is a good plan L, nail polish remover not so much. It's acetone and if any of that gets near the circuit board bits or the coil it'll almost certainly kill them.

    True, the nail varnish remover needs to be used carefully, but it is effective. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭saccades


    As a side note, it looks like the spring bars are quite bent - probably worth replacing those too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,721 ✭✭✭oleras


    saccades wrote: »
    As a side note, it looks like the spring bars are quite bent - probably worth replacing those too.

    In the first pic, its half in and half out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,110 ✭✭✭Thirdfox


    And if the watch is fogged up because water got inside you would definitely need to look at replacing the seals if you want to take the watch anywhere close to water again.

    Replacing all seals in a watch (and ensuring they don't pinch/are seated properly) isn't the easiest thing to do to be honest - it may be better to keep the watch away from water if you don't intend to change the seals.

    Here is an example of a crown gasket being installed:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOevtoh9HN0
    or
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55rALCINkzE

    If you do want to try this yourself I would recommend buying more than you need in case some of these snap/fly off the table and can't be found etc.

    Keep us updated on how you get on :)


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