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Tin on hurls

  • 16-02-2021 12:45am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭


    Hi

    This is for people that usually like tin on their hurls.

    For totally new hurls......do you get tin on them from the very start?

    Or do you ‘break them in’ for a few weeks and then get tin.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭arctictree


    obi604 wrote: »
    Hi

    This is for people that usually like tin on their hurls.

    For totally new hurls......do you get tin on them from the very start?

    Or do you ‘break them in’ for a few weeks and then get tin.

    What's tin? Do you mean a band?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭obi604


    arctictree wrote: »
    What's tin? Do you mean a band?

    Tin is the name of the actual material used, hence why I call it tin.

    No, I mean tin.


    Some people says bands, others say tin.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,282 ✭✭✭arctictree


    Could be wrong but I'm not sure if they are still legal??


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,494 ✭✭✭crossman47


    I prefer a band on my hurley


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭obi604


    crossman47 wrote: »
    I prefer a band on my hurley


    oh not this sh1te again
    each to their own


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,818 ✭✭✭✭Realt Dearg Sec


    obi604 wrote: »
    oh not this sh1te again
    each to their own

    Seriously, such useless responses.

    I always had a tin on my hurl when I got it. Have had a few with none on them and then had one put on when they were repairing a crack. I haven't heard of anyone waiting to put one on for the sake of waiting, is there a reason they'd do that? I can't see how that would be "better" to be honest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,818 ✭✭✭✭Realt Dearg Sec


    arctictree wrote: »
    Could be wrong but I'm not sure if they are still legal??

    Heard they banned them in cork for under twelves, dunno if that's the case elsewhere, and I don't know if the plan is to extend that ban upwards. My impression was that most kids don't want a band on their hurl anymore anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,441 ✭✭✭obi604


    Seriously, such useless responses.

    I always had a tin on my hurl when I got it. Have had a few with none on them and then had one put on when they were repairing a crack. I haven't heard of anyone waiting to put one on for the sake of waiting, is there a reason they'd do that? I can't see how that would be "better" to be honest.


    useless is right :cool:
    I was doing a bit of looking around and found the below.
    Always remember a few lads through the years and they purposely never put tin on new hurls and I never really wondered about the reason why.........until now :))


    https://canninghurleys.ie/product/goalie-canning-hurley/


    It is not advisable to purchase Tin for a new Hurley as the Hurley’s are very fresh, Tin & Tacks can weaken the Hurley at this early stage.


    https://lashgoleor.ie/hurley-care-and-maintenance/


    Never put a band on a new fresh Hurley. Nailing a fresh unused stick greatly increases the chances of your Bas splitting. Up to 90% of the splits we see in broken Hurls travel through the nailed part of the timber. At L’Ash Go Leor we only ever use bands to increase weight and lower end balance.


    Also from other webistes:

    1. Brian suggests that it’s better to buy the stick unbanded. “You need to allow a bit of time for timber to settle. You should leave them for a good week or so before banding them. And don’t keep them in the house!”

    2. I personally think that putting bands on a new Hurley can weaken the timber at the point where the nails are put in. When the Hurley needs to be repaired the bands can be put on the Hurley then, as the timber is weathered by then.

    3. If a Hurley is kept in a warm place the moisture is drawn out of the timber and this can cause them to split. In addition, if the Hurley has bands and they are kept in a warm place the bands can come loose and pop, due to the timber shrinking in the heat.

    4. Banding a hurley is to hold a repair together, it doesn't serve a purpose on a new hurley, If you "break the hurley in" right then that is the best way to get the most out of the hurley


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